Canada east – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 10:27:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png Canada east – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 Lewis Hamilton ‘overwhelmed’ to finish on the podium in Canada https://scbwicanada.org/lewis-hamilton-overwhelmed-to-finish-on-the-podium-in-canada/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:54:16 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/lewis-hamilton-overwhelmed-to-finish-on-the-podium-in-canada/ Lewis Hamilton felt ‘ecstatic’ with his second podium finish of the season as he rolled back the years to take third at the Canadian Grand Prix. The seven-time world champion has struggled with his Mercedes this season and has just arrived in Montreal. The design of this year’s cars has led some teams to suffer […]]]>

Lewis Hamilton felt ‘ecstatic’ with his second podium finish of the season as he rolled back the years to take third at the Canadian Grand Prix.

The seven-time world champion has struggled with his Mercedes this season and has just arrived in Montreal.

The design of this year’s cars has led some teams to suffer from bouncing – known as porpoising – at high speeds, with Mercedes being among the worst.

Hamilton needed help getting out of his car after the Azerbaijan Grand Prix a week ago and needed acupuncture and cryotherapy to get to the grid.

The 37-year-old qualified fourth in the Montreal rain on Saturday and went one better in the race, earning the 184th podium of his career but only his second of a difficult 2022.

Asked about the state of his back after the race, won by Max Verstappen, Hamilton said: “It feels good, I feel young again.

“It’s quite overwhelming to get that third place, it’s been such a battle this year as a team – I’m so proud and inspired by my crew.

“They are a bit too fast for us at the moment, I gave it my all and we are getting closer and closer.

Hamilton has approved the modified configuration of his Mercedes (Graham Hughes/AP)

“I could pretty much see them at the end thanks to the safety car, our pace was quite good so honestly I’m delighted, I didn’t expect that to happen this weekend.

“Third place is different from a win, but I think that’s how it is. Some consistency is coming, finally. I know we can do better, I know I can do more, I just have to keep going. work.

Red Bull team boss Christian Horner says the Mercedes’ “very strong” pace around Circuit Gilles Villeneuve could see the team “a factor” at the next race at Silverstone in a fortnight.

Although he impressed here, Hamilton limited his expectations for his homecoming: “It’s great today to be in the middle of the battle and for a second at the end I was pretty much to follow these guys.

“It gave me and the team a lot of hope that there is more to come from this car, that the potential is really there if we can get the settings right. We just have to keep the head down and keep working.

“I just want to be in a battle with these guys. In the end, when the safety car came and we started again, the dream was that I could continue in this battle with them and find a way – but they were fast. We will eventually find a way.

Hamilton said the rebound that gave him such trouble on the streets of Baku was “liveable” here.

His weekend improved greatly after an attempted set-up change left him unhappy after Friday’s two practice sessions.

It was only the second time this season that Hamilton had beaten new team-mate George Russell – whose streak of top-five finishes continued.

Now the experienced Hamilton wants to pass the responsibility to Russell when it comes to testing other ways of catching favourites.

“It was just impossible to drive (Friday),” he added. “It was just an experiment to see if the car worked there and we made the changes and the car was much better balanced. It was the difference between day and night.

“We still have some rebound, it’s not going away, but it was much better than Baku with the suspension we chose.

“Maybe the second half of the season George can do the experiments. We just try to progress as a team.

“I think in the future we will be a bit more careful about experimenting too much because it really annoys you throughout the weekend.

“I think there’s a lot to learn from this weekend and improvements we can make going forward, but we had really good pace and it was so nice to see.”

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An ‘example from the heart of Hamilton’: this eastern resident grows food to help feed his neighbors https://scbwicanada.org/an-example-from-the-heart-of-hamilton-this-eastern-resident-grows-food-to-help-feed-his-neighbors/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/an-example-from-the-heart-of-hamilton-this-eastern-resident-grows-food-to-help-feed-his-neighbors/ As food prices soar, an East Hamilton resident has planted fruits and vegetables that members of her community can take away for free when they’re ready to harvest. Christine Gordon says it’s her way of fighting food insecurity and helping people who are struggling to put food on their tables. Gordon has two gardens – […]]]>

As food prices soar, an East Hamilton resident has planted fruits and vegetables that members of her community can take away for free when they’re ready to harvest.

Christine Gordon says it’s her way of fighting food insecurity and helping people who are struggling to put food on their tables.

Gordon has two gardens – one right outside his house and the other a few yards across the street near Gage Avenue North and Barton Street East in Ward 3.

“[One] has a square of strawberries and regular vegetables,” Gordon told CBC Hamilton.

“The one in my house, I have all kinds of vegetables and I have crates full of vegetables and wildflowers that people can cut up and take home.

“I have tomatoes, rhubarb, potatoes, beans, peas, peppers, spinach, radishes, onions, garlic, sweet peas and Brussels sprouts. J So I have a whole variety,” she added.

Gordon has two gardens – one right outside his house and the other a few yards across the street. (Submitted by Christine Gordon)

Gordon says people in the neighborhood have welcomed the gardens.

“That’s the whole point. They come and they take what they need because they’re on [Ontario Disability Support Program] or on welfare and they can’t afford to buy food,” she said.

“Also a lot of them can’t walk or go to a food bank…There’s one couple I know in particular who can’t go to the food bank just because they can’t get to the food bank. go there physically. So they have the security of knowing that they can come and get fruit and vegetables from me.”

Different from a community garden

Gordon explains that although his gardens are for the whole community, they are not the same as a community garden.

“A community garden is what the community tends and takes care of, and sometimes a community garden has its own plots [that individuals tend to],” she says.

“For my gardens, I have it on my property and I have it in front of an industrial property, and I pay for it, take care of it and it’s available for whoever needs it or wants it. ”

Gordon says “it would be really great if we could have these all over the neighborhood,” adding that community gardens usually have a locked gate and aren’t accessible to everyone.

“You can’t access it [if you are not] a member of this community garden,” she said.

A strawberry plant in one of Gordon’s two gardens. (Submitted by Christine Gordon)

Gordon begins planting the last week of May and keeps the gardens active until the last week of October.

She says around 20 people regularly access the garden for supplies, but she keeps no record of who they are.

“I try not to look because I like people to feel comfortable coming in and taking what they need,” Gordon said.

Gordon says it costs him about $25 to run the gardens.

“I save seeds, I have a seed bank in front of my house for other people to swap seeds and I take some… I just try to make it work without spending too much money. money,” she said.

“Incredible” example of local engagement: a councilor

Meanwhile, Ward 3 Councilor Nrinder Nann praised Gordon for his project, which she described as an example of local residents engaging at ward level to address food security issues.

“She is an example of a resident knowing and responding to the needs of her local community,” Nann wrote in an email to CBC Hamilton.

“She is conscious and caring and has turned her home into a community center for what residents need. She is an incredible example of the heart of Hamilton. Seeing a need and meeting it is a strong example of Steeltown’s love. .”

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‘We don’t accept your apologies,’ activist tells Toronto police chief after race-based data released https://scbwicanada.org/we-dont-accept-your-apologies-activist-tells-toronto-police-chief-after-race-based-data-released/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 17:36:56 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/we-dont-accept-your-apologies-activist-tells-toronto-police-chief-after-race-based-data-released/ A sweeping Toronto police report released Wednesday confirms what many racialized people in the city have long been saying: Black, Indigenous and other diverse groups are disproportionately affected by use of force and street searches. naked by officers. At a morning press conference, Acting Toronto Police Chief James Ramer said the force needed to do […]]]>

A sweeping Toronto police report released Wednesday confirms what many racialized people in the city have long been saying: Black, Indigenous and other diverse groups are disproportionately affected by use of force and street searches. naked by officers.

At a morning press conference, Acting Toronto Police Chief James Ramer said the force needed to do better.

“As an organization, we have not done enough to ensure that every person in our city receives fair and impartial policing,” he said.

  • You can read the Toronto police briefing on the data at the bottom of this story.

“For this, as Chief of Police and on behalf of the police, I am sorry and apologize unreservedly,” Ramer continued.

“The release of this data will cause pain to many. We need to improve and we will do better.”

WATCH | Chief Ramer apologizes for systemic racism to Toronto Police Service:

Toronto police chief apologizes after race-based data released

Toronto Police Chief James Ramer has apologized to racialized communities after new data collected by the force showed communities were “disproportionately over-policed”.

The apology was not well received by Beverly Bain of the group No Pride in Policing, which describes itself as a coalition of queer and trans people formed to support Black Lives Matter Toronto and focused on defunding the police.

In a tense moment during the press conference, Bain criticized Ramer’s response to the data.

“Chief Ramer, we don’t accept your apologies,” she said, underscoring an impassioned speech about how black, Indigenous and other racialized groups have faced police in the city.

Bain called Ramer’s apology a “public relations stunt” that is “insulting” to black and Indigenous people.

“It’s not about saving our lives. What we’ve been asking you is to stop. Stop brutalizing us. Stop killing us,” she said.

WATCH | Beverly Bain says the black community has never asked for an apology:

“Chief Ramer, we do not accept your apologies”, says the lawyer

On Wednesday, Beverly Bain of the No Pride In Policing Coalition spoke to Toronto Police Chief James Ramer at a race-based data press conference.

More force used against Black more often: data

The never-before-seen statistics released today were drawn from records of 949 use-of-force incidents and 7,114 strip searches during the year 2020. The granular analysis, compiled by the Equity, Inclusion and Rights Unit of the Force alongside external data experts in concert with a 12-member community panel, examines a wide range of issues.

One of its findings was that Blacks, Indigenous peoples and Middle Easterners were all overrepresented in the number of “law enforcement actions” taken against them relative to their total population in Toronto. For black residents, it was a factor of 2.2.

In other words, blacks made up about 10% of the city’s population that year, but faced 22.6% of law enforcement, which includes arrests, provincial tickets, warnings and diversions.

Similarly, Blacks, Latinos, East/Southeast Asians, and Middle Easterners were overrepresented by factors of 1.6 times, 1.5 times, 1.2 times, and 1.2 times , respectively, with regard to the use of force.

Police also tended to use more force against racialized groups more often than whites, especially when it came to police officers drawing their guns.

Blacks, South Asians, and East/South Asians were significantly more likely than whites — 1.5 times, 1.6 times, and twice, respectively — to have an officer pointing a gun on them during an interaction.

The statistics also show that racial differences in the use of force remain even after taking into account what the police were initially called to investigate and what the primary offense was.

For many racialized groups, the police divisions in which they experienced the highest rates of use of force were also those in which they made up a smaller proportion of the population, the analysis found.

“Our own analysis of our 2020 data reveals that there is systemic discrimination in our police departments,” Ramer said.

“That is, there is a disproportionate impact on racialized people, especially those in black communities.”

Focus on systemic racism

The data is anonymized and intended to highlight systemic racism and bias in policing, Ramer said. It will not be used to identify “individual acts of racism” by officers, he added. These are cases of misconduct and there are other ways for the force to address them, Ramer said. He added that “overt racism” will never be tolerated.

The acting chief also spoke directly to Toronto police employees, saying he thinks they are more committed than ever to ending systemic racism within the force.

“I want you to know that this is an organizational shortcoming and it does not relate to your actions as police officers and civilian members,” he said.

“But we, every member of the service, should find the information released today difficult and uncomfortable.”

Ontario requires the public sector to collect race-based data as part of the anti-racism lawand in 2019, the Toronto Police Services Board approved a data policy that would begin with the use of force and then expand to other policing processes such as stops, searches, interrogations and depositions. of charges.

Acting Toronto Police Chief James Ramer said the data will not be used to sanction individual officers because provincial law requires it to be anonymized before analysis. (Tijana Martin/The Canadian Press)

Use of force data was drawn in part from reports officers submit to the Ministry of the Solicitor General after interactions requiring medical attention for members of the community, as well as any time an officer draws or uses a gun or Taser, or uses another weapon. like their truncheon or pepper spray.

The 949 use of force cases reported in 2020 represent 0.2% of the 692,937 recorded police interactions with the public. Firearms were pointed in 371 of those encounters and used in four, two of which were fatal, police said.

TPS admits to ‘abusing’ race-based data before

The release of the data follows several recent reports from human rights and police complaints watchdogs that called for major reforms within the Toronto police.

In 2018, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) concluded that Blacks were ‘grossly overrepresented’ in several types of violent police interactionsincluding use of force cases, shootings, deadly encounters and fatal shootings.

The OHRC reported that between 2013 and 2017 in Toronto, a black person was nearly 20 times more likely than a white person to be shot by police.

A follow-up OHRC analysis released in 2020 found that Blacks are also more likely than others to be arrested and charged during interactions with the Toronto police.

In its new report, the force admitted to having “misused” race-based data in the past. This is an apparent reference to carding – the practice of collecting identifying information during random street checks – which the province decided to significantly restrict in 2017.

Reforms led to a dramatic drop in strip searches

Research published Wednesday also looked at whether racial groups were disproportionately represented in strip searches.

The results show that Aboriginal people were 1.3 times overrepresented relative to their presence in arrests. Meanwhile, blacks and whites were 1.1 times overrepresented.

Toronto Police revised their strip search procedures in October 2020, which led to a dramatic drop in the number of searches from that point on.

Before the changes, about 27% of all arrests that year involved a strip search. That dropped to four about five percent after that.

Changes to the policy provided that all strip searches be authorized by a supervisor and vetted by senior management.

The reforms have helped end the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in strip searches in 2021, the analysis concluded. But racial gaps remained for black and white residents who were arrested.

The changes were introduced after a 2019 report by the Office of the Independent Police Review Director found that unnecessary and illegal strip searches had become common practice among police forces in Ontario.

The report released this morning also includes 38 actions that the force says will help address racial gaps in use-of-force incidents and strip searches. At a media briefing on Tuesday, a police official said a publicly available online dashboard will track the force’s progress in implementing actions in the months and years to come.

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How Anne of Green Gables inspired this newcomer’s award-winning short story https://scbwicanada.org/how-anne-of-green-gables-inspired-this-newcomers-award-winning-short-story/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 17:19:42 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/how-anne-of-green-gables-inspired-this-newcomers-award-winning-short-story/ When Norman Ho arrived in Prince Edward Island last year from Hong Kong, many people introduced him to the classic coming-of-age tale, Anne of Green Gables. He said he was immediately captivated by the poetic and descriptive language of Lucy Maud Montgomery, and took many notes on the language on his phone. “When I read […]]]>

When Norman Ho arrived in Prince Edward Island last year from Hong Kong, many people introduced him to the classic coming-of-age tale, Anne of Green Gables.

He said he was immediately captivated by the poetic and descriptive language of Lucy Maud Montgomery, and took many notes on the language on his phone.

“When I read the book, there are so many vocabularies that I don’t know. So I start making a list of vocabularies that I don’t understand.”

Ho put these new words and phrases to good use when he wrote his short story titled, I beg your pardonwho recently won an Island Literary Award for Newcomers to Canada.

“When I write the story, I use as many vocabularies as possible,” he said.

“For example, in my story, there is a sentence that says, ‘The crisp Atlantic air of early winter meets the smell of soft woods and red earth, accompanied by an orchestra of ‘birds, insects and leaves,'” Ho said.

“I tried to be descriptive.”

When Ho was introduced to the Anne of Green Gables series, he found there were a lot of words and phrases he didn’t know, so he jotted them down on his phone. (Thinh Nguyen/CBC)

The award was first presented last year by the PEI Writers’ Guild and the Immigrant and Refugee Services Association (IRSA) PEI

“I put my personal experience into it”

The Island Literary Awards jury described the short story as an “immigrant tale of a relationship with place and person, rich in wit, wisdom and thought”, according to the PEI Writers’ Guild.

The short story revolves around a newcomer who arrives in Charlottetown when he wants to start a new life.

“The whole story is based on my real life experience and the people I met on the island and elsewhere.”

island morning7:05Islander wins Island Literary Award for Newcomers to Canada

Newcomer Norman Ho, who recently won an Island Literary Award, talks about his news and why he decided to come to PEI.

For example, since arriving in Prince Edward Island, Ho said he has heard many people say “I beg your pardon” in their conversations with him.

“They often say ‘I beg your pardon’, maybe because I don’t speak English very well, and people need to hear me repeat the sentence again. But I also find that ‘I beg your pardon’ or ‘Pardon?’ or “Excuse me”, they always have some ambiguity.”

“When I put [it] in different contexts it could mean different things,” he said. “Sometimes it’s sarcastic.

The phrase “I beg your pardon” therefore comes up a lot in the dialogues between the main character and the other people in the story, he said.

Also inspired by the poetic language of Montgomery, Ho wanted to add elements of poetry to his story.

He put a poem in the middle of the story and a second at the end when the protagonist realizes he has to get out of a relationship that has turned sour.

“The east wind is blowing violently. The robins have left their footprints on the snow. As I go, life unfolds.”

“So at the end of the story, the character, he closes the window behind but opens the door in front of him, and moves on,” he said.

Ho said he discovered some things in his personal life while working on the story, and the writing process helped him a lot.

“I don’t think about the message of the story when I write because when I write it’s more of a personal meditation process,” he said.

“But I subconsciously believe…I think making changes and having the courage to move forward is the key to happiness.”

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Canada announce squad for Concacaf Men’s Under-20 Championship https://scbwicanada.org/canada-announce-squad-for-concacaf-mens-under-20-championship/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 07:22:49 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/canada-announce-squad-for-concacaf-mens-under-20-championship/ Canada Soccer has announced its squad for the upcoming Concacaf Men’s Under-20 Championship 2022, Canada’s qualification pathway for the FIFA U-20 World Cup Indonesia 2023 and the Men’s Olympic Football Tournament 2024. Canada’s 20-man squad, coached by Mauro Biello, will compete June 18-July 3 for one of four Concacaf berths for the FIFA U-20 World […]]]>

Canada Soccer has announced its squad for the upcoming Concacaf Men’s Under-20 Championship 2022, Canada’s qualification pathway for the FIFA U-20 World Cup Indonesia 2023 and the Men’s Olympic Football Tournament 2024. Canada’s 20-man squad, coached by Mauro Biello, will compete June 18-July 3 for one of four Concacaf berths for the FIFA U-20 World Cup and one of two Concacaf berths for the Games Olympics.

Of the remaining 20 Concacaf nations, Canada are in Group E with matches against Cuba, St. Kitts and Nevis and the United States. From Group E, three nations will advance to the knockout stage. Throughout the competition, fans will find extensive coverage on Canada Soccer’s digital channels on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube with the hashtag #canm20.

CANADA SOCCER MEN’S NATIONAL TEAM PROGRAM
Canada Soccer’s men’s national team are three-time Concacaf champions, having previously won the Concacaf Championship in 1985, the Concacaf Gold Cup in 2000 and Concacaf Qualifiers in 2021-22. Canada recently qualified for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar and have previously competed at the 1976 and 1984 Olympics, the 1986 FIFA World Cup and the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup.

Canada Soccer’s youth men’s national teams have won two Concacaf titles: the 1986 and 1996 Concacaf Men’s Youth Championships. Canada has qualified for 15 FIFA Men’s Youth Tournaments: eight editions of the FIFA FIFA U-20 World Cup and seven editions of the FIFA U-17 World Cup. Canada recently qualified for the FIFA U-17 World Cup Brazil 2019, which was FIFA’s last junior men’s competition before the global pandemic.

CANADA:
1- GK- Ben Alexander | CAN / Vancouver Whitecaps FC Academy
2- FB- Noah Abatneh | ITA / SS Lazio Rome
3- FB- Kwasi Poku | CAN / Forge FC Hamilton
4-CB-Justin Smith | FRA / OGC Nice
5- CB – Jamie Knight-Lebel | ENG / Bristol City FC
6- CB- Matteo Campagna | CAN / Vancouver Whitecaps FC 2
7-W-Jean-Aniel Assi | CAN / FC Cavalry
8- M- Rida Zouhir | CAN / CF Montreal
9- F- Lowell Wright | CAN / York United FC
10-M-Matt Catavolo | CAN / Value FC
11- F- Kamron Habibullah | CAN / Pacific FC
12- CB- Loïc Cloutier | CAN / CF Montreal Academy
13-FB-Kobe Franklin | CAN / Toronto FC II
14- Mr. Gabriel Pellegrino | GER / SC Freiburg
15- FB- Keesean Ferdinand | CAN / CF Montreal
16- M- Mael Henry | CAN / Montreal Impact Academy
17-M-Jesse Costa | GER / VfL Wolfsburg
18- GK- Dino Bontis | CAN / Forge FC Hamilton
19- F- Tiago Coimbra | BRA / SE Palmeiras
20- F- Hugo Mbongue Mbongue | CAN / Toronto FC II

PLAYERS IN TRAINING:
GK – Adisa De Rosario | CAN / Toronto FC Academy
CB – Jefferson Alphonse | CAN / CF Montreal
CB – Adam Pearlman | CAN / Toronto FC
FB – Eric White | CAN / Vancouver Whitecaps FC 2
Mr Hugo Tavares | POR / FC Pacos de Ferreira

CANADA-AZ:
Player | Year of birth | City they grew up in | Notable youth clubs
Abatneh, Noah | 2004 | Toronto, ON, CAN | Ottawa St. Anthony SC
Alexander, Ben | 2003 | Chilliwack, BC, CAN |
Alfonso, Jefferson | 2003 | Anjou, QC, CAN | FC Anjou
Assi, Jean Aniel | 2004 | Montreal, QC, CAN | ASM LaSalle
Bontis, Dino | 2004 | Ancaster, ON, CAN | Hamilton Sparta
Campagna, Matteo | 2004 | Surrey, BC, CAN | Surrey United SC
Catavolo, Matt | 2003 | Laval, QC, CAN | ASTMP St-Michel
Cloutier, Loic | 2004 | Montreal, QC, CAN | FC Three Lakes
Coimbra, Tiago | 2004 | Vancouver, BC, CAN | Escolinha do Flamengo
Costa, Jesse | 2005 | Brampton, ON, CAN | Prostars FC
From Rosario, Adisa | 2004 | Toronto, ON, CAN |
Ferdinand, Keesean | 2003 | Montreal, QC, CAN | Riviere des Prairies
Franklin, Kobe | 2003 | Toronto, ON, CAN | SL Beach Community
Habibullah, Kamron | 2003 | Vancouver, BC, CAN | South Burnaby Metro SC
Henri, Mael | 2004 | Montreal, QC, CAN | CS Buccaneers Montreal
Knight-Lebel, Jamie | 2004 | Bristol, England | AFC Stapleton
Mbongue Mbongue, Hugo | 2004 | Toronto, ON, CAN | Cherry Beach Recreation Center
Pearlman, Adam | 2005 | Thornhill, ON, CAN | Highland Parks
Pellegrino, Gabriel | 2004 | Toronto, ON, CAN | Woodbridge SC
Poku, Kwasi | 2003 | Brampton, ON, CAN | Brampton East SC
Smith, Justin | 2003 | Voisins-le-Bretonneux, Yvelines, FRA | FC neighbors
Tavares, Hugo | 2003 | Santarém and Porto, POR | Academic Association of Santarém
White, Eric | 2003 | Coquitlam, BC, CAN | Coquitlam Metro-Ford SC
Wright, Lowell | 2003 | Brampton, ON, CAN | Brampton CSY
Zouhir, Rida | 2003 | Montreal, QC, CAN |

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Winnipeg set to offer $10 million in tax relief for bay redevelopment https://scbwicanada.org/winnipeg-set-to-offer-10-million-in-tax-relief-for-bay-redevelopment/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:07:44 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/winnipeg-set-to-offer-10-million-in-tax-relief-for-bay-redevelopment/ City of Winnipeg to provide Southern Chiefs’ Organization with up to $9.7 million in property tax refunds over 25 years as part of program to help with $135 million redevelopment of the old Hudson’s Bay building. The organization plans to redevelop the six-story, 650,000-square-foot heritage structure located at Portage Avenue and Memorial Boulevard into a […]]]>

City of Winnipeg to provide Southern Chiefs’ Organization with up to $9.7 million in property tax refunds over 25 years as part of program to help with $135 million redevelopment of the old Hudson’s Bay building.

The organization plans to redevelop the six-story, 650,000-square-foot heritage structure located at Portage Avenue and Memorial Boulevard into a mixed-use building called Wehwehneh Bahgahkinahgohn. The redevelopment plan calls for 300 housing units, health and child care centers, a First Nations museum, an art gallery and two restaurants.

The province is contributing $35 million to the project, while the federal government has provided loans worth $65 million, requiring only $10 million to be repaid.

In a new report to the City Council’s Policy Executive Committee, the city offers SCO an 80% rebate on property taxes the development will generate each year after a new occupancy permit is issued, likely in 2025 or 2026 .

This refund, which uses a mechanism called tax increment financing, will be in place for 25 years. That will average $388,000 a year, Winnipeg economic development director Matt Dryburgh wrote in the report to EPC.

“The transfer of the HBC Building to COS marks an important act of economic and social reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and a significant revitalization project for downtown Winnipeg,” writes Dryburgh.

Once the building is redeveloped, the city expects to continue to collect about $97,000 in property taxes from the site each year, which is an increase from the current annual tax bill of $62,000, according to reports.

The city is also proposing to expedite permits for the project and waive up to $350,000 in permit and planning fees, according to the report.

“There is recent precedent for council approving a reimbursement of similar costs, having approved a reimbursement of $400,000 for estimated permitting and planning costs associated with a Portage Place shopping center redevelopment project,” Dryburgh writes.

The city is also proposing to improve the sidewalks and streetscape around the Old Bay Building by 2025 and may repair areas – hollow spaces under the sidewalks – along the north, east and west of the block, the report says.

The Hudson’s Bay Company flagship store in Winnipeg opened on Portage Avenue and Memorial Boulevard in 1926. The city has granted heritage protection status to the building’s limestone cladding, awnings west and north and its curved elevator hall within.

HBC began closing floors of retail space in the building in the 1990s and permanently closed the store in November 2020.

The company transferred the structure to the Southern Chiefs’ Organization in April.

The aid plan for the redevelopment of the bay is presented to the policy executive committee on June 15 and to the council as a whole on June 23.

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Donor Spotlight: George Fischer – Tennis Canada https://scbwicanada.org/donor-spotlight-george-fischer-tennis-canada/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 18:32:24 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/donor-spotlight-george-fischer-tennis-canada/ Welcome to a brand new series of content where we spotlight some of Tennis Canada’s amazing donors. It is thanks to the the support we receive from our generous donors that we can continue to fund various projects from the local level to the national stage. Here, we pay tribute to the people who help […]]]>

Welcome to a brand new series of content where we spotlight some of Tennis Canada’s amazing donors. It is thanks to the the support we receive from our generous donors that we can continue to fund various projects from the local level to the national stage. Here, we pay tribute to the people who help us make Canada a tennis nation.

In 2020, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Tennis Canada was forced to suspend numerous events, including the world-renowned National Bank Open presented by Rogers in Toronto and Montreal. As a result of the postponements, the organization incurred losses of $17 million and found itself in dire need of assistance.

George Fischer, one of Canada’s most prolific landscape photographers and avid tennis fan, discovered Tennis Canada’s financial struggles, and he and his late wife Karen Green stepped up and donated $1 million. dollars to the organization.

George and Karen’s substantial contribution has been invested in Tennis Canada’s Junior National Championships, both indoor and outdoor, which have since been renamed the Fischer Junior Indoor National Championships and the Fischer Junior Outdoor National Championships respectively.

They also donated an additional $250,000 (25 prizes worth $10,000 each) over five years to cover training and travel costs for promising young players.

Photo: Richard Chin

When Tennis Canada announced the renaming of the National Junior Championships in October 2020, George spoke to the organization to outline the purpose of their generosity.

“This investment is a representation of our passion for tennis in Canada,” said George Fischer. “We are determined to do everything we can to help develop more high performance players so that we can see more Canadians win more Grand Slam titles, Olympic medals and our teams make deep runs in the Cup. Davis and the Billie Jean King Cup.

“We understand the financial challenges Tennis Canada is currently experiencing due to COVID-19 and see this investment as a legacy that will help immensely in the short term, but will also ensure progress in the long term. We hope that by being made aware of Tennis Canada’s losses due to the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, more donors will come forward and make similar investments. It is a real honor that the National Junior Championships are renamed the Fischer National Junior Championships.

Tennis Canada hosted the first Fischer Outdoor Junior National Championships in the fall of 2021, and this year the Fischer Indoor Junior National Championships made their long-awaited debut and crowned their first-ever champions. Both tournaments have singles and doubles draws and are divided into four divisions: U12, U14, U16 and U18.

Tennis has always been close to George’s heart, and he has been playing the sport since he was the same age as the talented youngsters who compete in the event that bears his name. He is currently a member of the Mayfair Toronto East Club, and in a interview with Mayfairadmitted that he still tries to go out and play with his friends every day.

Besides running around a yellow ball, George is one of the most talented photographers in the country and specializes in landscape and cultural photography. He has published more than 70 photographic books and 50 art posters, and his photos have appeared on the covers of numerous international magazines, newspapers and promotional publications of tourist agencies around the world.

George loves his job and even admits that two of his greatest passions in life are tennis and photography.

At the Fischer Junior Indoor and Outdoor Nationals, George can do both.

Photo: George Fischer

Tennis Canada thanks all of its donors. To learn more about how you can support tennis in Canada, please contact jbridgman@tenniscanada.com.

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Ontario Liberal Leader Steven Del Duca set to lose as PCs gain momentum in GTA https://scbwicanada.org/ontario-liberal-leader-steven-del-duca-set-to-lose-as-pcs-gain-momentum-in-gta/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 01:45:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/ontario-liberal-leader-steven-del-duca-set-to-lose-as-pcs-gain-momentum-in-gta/ Ontario Liberal Leader Steven Del Duca is expected to lose his candidacy Thursday to win back the riding of Vaughan-Woodbridge north of Toronto. CBC News projects Progressive Conservative incumbent Michael Tibollo as the winner. Tibollo ousted Del Duca, a former cabinet minister in Kathleen Wynne’s government, from that seat in the 2018 Ontario election. The […]]]>

Ontario Liberal Leader Steven Del Duca is expected to lose his candidacy Thursday to win back the riding of Vaughan-Woodbridge north of Toronto.

CBC News projects Progressive Conservative incumbent Michael Tibollo as the winner. Tibollo ousted Del Duca, a former cabinet minister in Kathleen Wynne’s government, from that seat in the 2018 Ontario election.

The news comes on a bitterly disappointing night for Del Duca’s Liberals as Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives head for a second majority government in Ontario, according to plans from CBC News’ decision desk. Meanwhile, the Liberals are only leading by a handful of seats.

For an up-to-date list of results across Ontario as results are tallied, visit CBC News Election Results Tracker.

Del Duca became leader of the Ontario Liberals in March 2020, just before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. It has since operated without a seat in Queen’s Park. He hoped this election would mark a comeback for both him and the Liberal Party, which was reduced to a distant third in the Legislative Assembly four years ago when Doug Ford’s Conservatives won a big victory in the province.

Del Duca lost that 2018 battle with Tibollo by 8,000 votes.

Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives are heading for a second majority government in Ontario, according to plans from CBC News’ policy office. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

Tibollo served as cabinet minister throughout the last four-year term, but was twice demoted to lesser posts. Ford campaigned for him in his constituency to retain his seat.

On May 20, Del Duca told reporters he would win back the riding. He first won it in a by-election in 2012.

The last time a leader of one of Ontario’s three main parties did not win a seat in a general election was in 2007, when then-PC leader John Tory lost in Don Valley West. The winner of that race was Liberal Kathleen Wynne, who became prime minister six years later.

Meanwhile, PCs are gaining momentum in the Greater Toronto Area as they seek to retain critical seats in Mississauga and win seats in Brampton. In 2018, PCs won nearly every riding in the Greater Toronto Area, except for three in Brampton that elected NDP MPs.

PCs should sweep Brampton, Mississauga

The Progressive Conservatives are expected to sweep Brampton and much of the rest of the Greater Toronto Area with it. PCs are expected to win Brampton West and Brampton South again, seats held by Amarjot Sandhu and Prabmeet Sarkaria respectively. They also lead in Brampton Center and Brampton East, two seats that were previously held by the NDP.

Former councilor Charmaine Williams is expected to win the Brampton Centre, which was held by NDP Deputy Leader Sara Singh.

Hardeep Grewal is expected to win Brampton East, taking the seat from Gurratan Singh, the brother of federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh. Brampton North, which was an NDP seat until Kevin Yarde became independent, is expected to be won by Graham McGregor.

During the campaign, Ford touted proposed Highway 413 and more hospital beds as reasons why Brampton voters should choose the PC party. The results show that this approach worked.

Meanwhile, the Liberals won no seats in the GTA.

Brampton’s sweep extends to Peel as PCs are expected to win all six Mississauga ridings. The Liberals had campaigned hard in Mississauga, including the last day of the campaign when Del Duca visited the city. Several Liberal candidates are expected to come second in their riding races in the city west of Toronto.

York Region’s eight constituencies are expected to remain in the PC column, while four of Durham’s five constituencies are also expected to remain in the PC column.

However, Oshawa is poised to buck the Progressive Conservative tide, as NDP candidate Jennifer French is expected to retain her seat for a second straight term.

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ananth narayanan: Mensa Brands expands into US, Middle East and other global markets https://scbwicanada.org/ananth-narayanan-mensa-brands-expands-into-us-middle-east-and-other-global-markets/ Tue, 31 May 2022 09:55:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/ananth-narayanan-mensa-brands-expands-into-us-middle-east-and-other-global-markets/ Bengaluru: E-commerce deployment platform Mensa Brands, founded by former Myntra CEO Ananth Narayanan, is aggressively expanding into international markets, including the United States, the Middle East and Canada, after having attained a net income rate of Rs 1,500 crore ($200 million) in its first year. of operations. Net income is the sale value of goods […]]]>
Bengaluru: E-commerce deployment platform Mensa Brands, founded by former Myntra CEO Ananth Narayanan, is aggressively expanding into international markets, including the United States, the Middle East and Canada, after having attained a net income rate of Rs 1,500 crore ($200 million) in its first year. of operations.

Net income is the sale value of goods excluding returns and discounts.

It comes at a time when the rolled-up commerce sector is facing headwinds, with the likes of Thrasio cutting costs amid a CEO change.

Narayanan told ET that more than 30% of the company’s revenue now comes from markets outside India and 50% of its brand portfolio is available outside the country. Mensa operates in the United States, United Arab Emirates, Canada, United Kingdom, Germany and Singapore through marketplaces and its own platform. “We don’t burn money in any brands, we only use the money we raised to acquire new brands,” Narayanan said.

The company aims to double its net income rate to Rs 3,000 crore over the next year and will hire an additional 700 people to double the size of its team to 1,400 as it eyes further expansion in India and overseas. ‘foreign.

Mensa already operates 20 brands online and will be looking to add another 20. Narayanan expects some deals to be relatively cheap due to the slowdown in startup funding. The company said it also made Ebitda (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization) positive, excluding one-time expenses related to the acquisition of its brands.

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“We had a very good start to the year. We are at Rs 1,500 crore in net income rate, we have more than 20 brands, the organic growth rate of these brands is over 80%,” Narayanan said. Mensa operates brands in fashion, lifestyle and home and Narayanan said the company may look to enter a new category this year.

He described the company’s technology as the “secret sauce” that helped Mensa grow with a positive unit economy.

“There is the demand side and the supply side. On the demand side, we’ve built brand analytics, we’ve built pricing, there’s API integration with Amazon, Flipkart, Ajio, Myntra,

. We have the ability to review data, prices, reviews and ratings in real time, we scratch the ratings. On the supply side, we have models for warehouse management, inventory management, order management, and forecasting. We built all of these systems in-house and that’s our secret sauce,” he said.

Mensa sells its brands in both markets as well as on the brands’ own websites, but Narayanan said entering new markets would not be a money-burning exercise.

“On Amazon, your reviews and ratings translate there. It carries over to other markets as well,” he said. “Product development and online sales spending is all centralized in India.”

The company has three offices in India, in Bangalore, Gurugram and Mumbai.

Narayanan also expects acquisitions to become cheaper as funding dries up, particularly in the commercial rollup space, which received record seed funding rounds in 2021.

While many companies started with the same goal and similar funding rounds, ET reported on April 20, citing multiple industry trackers, that well-funded brand houses such as Firstcry-backed Mensa Brands and Globalbees have grabbed a substantial chunk of funds and acquired a plethora of brands, leaving behind smaller players such as Upscalio, Goat, 10Club, Powerhouse91, Evenflow and Bzaar.

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2022 NHL Playoffs Bracket: Schedule, Second Round TV Times Update, How to Watch, Scores, Highlights https://scbwicanada.org/2022-nhl-playoffs-bracket-schedule-second-round-tv-times-update-how-to-watch-scores-highlights/ Sun, 29 May 2022 02:50:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/2022-nhl-playoffs-bracket-schedule-second-round-tv-times-update-how-to-watch-scores-highlights/ The Stanley Cup playoffs are one of the most exciting post-season formats in sports. For the first time in three years, each team played a full 82-game regular-season schedule without interruption due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Divisions were completely back to normal, with teams allowed to cross the border and play in Canada and vice […]]]>

The Stanley Cup playoffs are one of the most exciting post-season formats in sports. For the first time in three years, each team played a full 82-game regular-season schedule without interruption due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Divisions were completely back to normal, with teams allowed to cross the border and play in Canada and vice versa.

CBS Sports

The structure of the playoffs is as follows:

  • The playoff format allows the team with the most points to play the second wild card team in the first round of each conference. The division winner with the second most points will face the top wild card team.
  • Each series will be in best-of-seven format
  • Home ice advantage goes to the team with the highest seed in the first two rounds of the playoffs. The team with the most points in the regular season will play at home in the Conference Finals and the Stanley Cup Final.

Stanley Cup Playoff Information

TV: ESPN, ESPN2, TBS, TNT
Flow: fuboTV (Try for free)
Follow: CBS Sports app

All times Eastern
(* if necessary)

EASTERN CONFERENCE SEMI-FINALS SCHEDULE

Tampa Bay Lightning vs. Florida Panthers (TB wins, 4-0)
Game 1: Lightning 4, Panthers 1 | to sum up
Game 2: Lightning 2, Panthers 1 | to sum up
Game 3: Lightning 5, Panthers 1 | to sum up
Game 4: Lightning 2, Panthers 0 | to sum up

New York Rangers at Carolina Hurricanes (series tied, 3-3)
Game 1: Hurricanes 2, Rangers 1 (OT) | to sum up
Game 2: Hurricanes 2, Rangers 0 | to sum up
Game 3: Rangers 3, Hurricanes 1 | to sum up
Game 4: Rangers 4, Hurricanes 1 | to sum up
Game 5: Hurricanes 3, Rangers 1 | to sum up
Game 6: Rangers 5, Hurricanes 2 | to sum up
Game 7*: Monday, May 30, to be determined | to CAR | Television: to be determined

WESTERN CONFERENCE SEMI-FINALS SCHEDULE

St. Louis Blues vs. Colorado Avalanche (COL wins, 4-2)
Game 1: Avalanche 3, Blues 2 (OT) | to sum up
Game 2: Blues 4, Avalanche 1 | to sum up
Game 3: Avalanche 5, Blues 2 | to sum up
Game 4: Avalanche 6, Blues 3 | to sum up
Game 5: Blues 5, Avalanche 4 (OT) | to sum up
Game 6: Avalanche 3, Blues 2 | to sum up

Edmonton Oilers vs. Calgary Flames (EDM wins, 4-1)
Game 1: Flames 9, Oilers 6 | to sum up
Game 2: Oilers 5, Flames 3 | to sum up
Game 3: Oilers 4, Flames 1 | to sum up
Game 4: Oilers 5, Flames 3 | to sum up
Game 5: Oilers 5, Flames 4 | to sum up

FIRST ROUND RESULTS

Florida Panthers beat Washington Capitals, 4-2
Game 1: Capitals 4, Panthers 2 | to sum up
Game 2: Panthers 5, Capitals 1 I Recap
Game 3: Capitals 6, Panthers 1 | to sum up
Game 4: Panthers 3, Capitals 2 (OT) I Recap
Game 5: Panthers 5, Capitals 3 | to sum up
Game 6: Panthers 4, Capitals 3 (OT) | to sum up

Tampa Bay Lightning beat Toronto Maple Leafs, 4-3
Game 1: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 0 | to sum up
Game 2: Lightning 5, Maple Leafs 3 I Recap
Game 3: Maple Leafs 5, Lightning 2 | to sum up
Game 4: Lightning 7, Maple Leafs 3 | to sum up
Game 5: Maple Leafs 4, Lightning 3 | to sum up
Game 6: Lightning 4, Maple Leafs 3 (OT) | to sum up
Game 7: Lightning 2, Maple Leafs 1 | to sum up

Carolina Hurricanes beat Boston Bruins, 4-3
Game 1: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1 | to sum up
Game 2: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 2 I Recap
Game 3: Bruins 4, Hurricanes 2 | to sum up
Game 4: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2 | to sum up
Game 5: Hurricanes 5, Bruins 1 I Recap
Game 6: Bruins 5, Hurricanes 2 | to sum up
Game 7: Hurricanes 3, Bruins 2 | to sum up

New York Rangers beat Pittsburgh Penguins, 4-3
Game 1: Penguins 4, Rangers 3 (3OT) | to sum up
Game 2: Rangers 5, Penguins 2 | to sum up
Game 3: Penguins 7, Rangers 4 | to sum up
Game 4: Penguins 7, Rangers 2 | to sum up
Game 5: Rangers 5, Penguins 3 | to sum up
Game 6: Rangers 5, Penguins 3 | to sum up
Game 7: Rangers 4, Penguins 3 (OT) | to sum up

Colorado Avalanche beat Nashville Predators, 4-0
Game 1: Avalanche 7, Predators 2 | to sum up
Game 2: Avalanche 2, Predators 1 (OT) | to sum up
Game 3: Avalanche 7, Predators 3 | to sum up
Game 4: Avalanche 5, Predators 3 | to sum up

St. Louis Blues beat Minnesota Wild, 4-2
Game 1: Blues 4, Wild 0 | to sum up
Game 2: Wild 6, Blues 2 I Recap
Game 3: Wild 5, Blues 1 | to sum up
Game 4: Blues 5, Wild 2 | to sum up
Game 5: Blues 5, Wild 2 | to sum up
Game 6: Blues 4, Wild 1 | to sum up

Calgary Flames beat Dallas Stars, 4-3
Game 1: Flames 1, Stars 0 | to sum up
Game 2: Stars 2, Flames 0 | to sum up
Game 3: Stars 4, Flames 2 | to sum up
Game 4: Flames 4, Stars 1 | to sum up
Game 5: Flames 3, Stars 1 | to sum up
Game 6: Stars 4, Flames 2 | to sum up
Game 7: Flames 3, Stars 2 (OT) | to sum up

Edmonton Oilers beat Los Angeles Kings, 4-3
Game 1: Kings 4, Oilers 3 | to sum up
Game 2: Oilers 6, Kings 0 | to sum up
Game 3: Oilers 8, Kings 2 | to sum up
Game 4: Kings 4, Oilers 0 I Recap
Game 5: Kings 5, Oilers 4 (OT) I Recap
Game 6: Oilers 4, Kings 2 | to sum up
Game 7: Oilers 2, Kings 0 | to sum up

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