Canada regions – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 23:02:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png Canada regions – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 Northern Saskatchewan tops list for recent Canadian job growth https://scbwicanada.org/northern-saskatchewan-tops-list-for-recent-canadian-job-growth/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 21:54:48 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/northern-saskatchewan-tops-list-for-recent-canadian-job-growth/ The other four in Saskatchewan, Regina-Moose Mountain, Saskatoon-Biggar, Swift Current-Moose Jaw and Yorkton-Melville, all had lower totals. Yorkton-Melville is the only one other than Prince Albert and Northern to see an increase. Joel Bruneau, chair of the economics department at the University of Saskatchewan, said PANOW he doesn’t think this increase is entirely related to […]]]>

The other four in Saskatchewan, Regina-Moose Mountain, Saskatoon-Biggar, Swift Current-Moose Jaw and Yorkton-Melville, all had lower totals.

Yorkton-Melville is the only one other than Prince Albert and Northern to see an increase.

Joel Bruneau, chair of the economics department at the University of Saskatchewan, said PANOW he doesn’t think this increase is entirely related to the recovery from COVID-19.

“The industries that are boosting the northern economy seem to be doing quite well and this seems to be driving this recent trend. “

This includes the forestry and mineral sectors, as lumber and uranium prices are “on the rise”.

The sectors with the strongest monthly increases were construction and manufacturing, which alone accounted for about 1,200 positions.

The wholesale and retail trade and education sectors also added 500 jobs each.

At the start of the pandemic, the region experienced a sharp decline in the number of jobs.

As of March 2020, approximately 97,600 people in northern Saskatchewan were employed. By June 2020, the number had fallen to around 89,500.

Unlike the big cities, which have been hit very hard and continue to rebound, the region has been able to recover much faster.

In July, about four months after the start of the pandemic, about 3,700 jobs were created.

Since then, the number of posts has exceeded 94,000, officially reaching over 100,000 last month, marking the first time this has happened since September 2016.

Bruneau adds that when less populated regions experience a large increase, it is usually because of large projects, however, in this case, he does not think so.

“It suggests it’s pretty common. It’s all over the north.

Jaryn.Vecchio@pattisonmedia.com

On Twitter: @princealbertnow



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All eyes on Mississauga as global tech companies continue to invest in the city – City of Mississauga https://scbwicanada.org/all-eyes-on-mississauga-as-global-tech-companies-continue-to-invest-in-the-city-city-of-mississauga/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 16:46:46 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/all-eyes-on-mississauga-as-global-tech-companies-continue-to-invest-in-the-city-city-of-mississauga/ Mississauga is gaining global attention in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector with a growing number of international investments, including Cognizant, HCL Technologies and Infosys. “Mississauga is located at the center of North America’s second largest technology cluster and the Toronto-Waterloo technology corridor, and has become a leading Canadian city for innovative and technology-driven […]]]>

Mississauga is gaining global attention in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector with a growing number of international investments, including Cognizant, HCL Technologies and Infosys.

“Mississauga is located at the center of North America’s second largest technology cluster and the Toronto-Waterloo technology corridor, and has become a leading Canadian city for innovative and technology-driven businesses,” said Mayor Bonnie Crombie. “Technology companies are drawn to Mississauga for its location, large talent pool, and educated and diverse workforce. We are very pleased to see the investments of Cognizant, HCL Technologies and Infosys bringing hundreds of jobs as well as development opportunities to our local workforce.

Recent investments and expansions in Mississauga in the ICT sector include:

Competent – the first technology leader to invest in Mississauga; A 50,000 square foot regional technology and service delivery center opened in 2018 which includes training rooms, a digital lab and co-innovation space for customers and has since continued to expand.

“Mississauga is an important hub for Cognizant’s Canadian operations, and we are proud to be a long-time member of the community,” said Jay MacIsaac, Global Delivery Center Manager and Atlantic Canada Regional Manager, Cognizant . “It is a dynamic market with leading technological talents and academic institutions, as well as the headquarters of many of our major clients in the banking, insurance and sales sectors. by retail. Since opening our delivery center, we have continued to expand, occupying nearly 100,000 square feet of office space and creating well beyond our initial target of 600 local jobs. We plan to employ approximately 1,000 people locally over the next two years.

HCL Technologies – opened a new, state-of-the-art 350-seat global delivery center in Mississauga earlier this year. It is one of the largest HCL centers in Canada, home to co-innovation labs for clients to imagine, collaborate, develop and deliver futuristic solutions through next generation technologies in their transformation journeys. business. HCL plans to create 2,000 new job opportunities across Canada over the next three years, engaging Canada’s diverse and highly skilled local talent to serve its global clients.

“HCL is a global IT leader who chose Mississauga for the potential to tap into a diverse community, skilled talent base and academic institutions,” said Joelien Jose, Executive Vice President, Country Head – HCL Canada. “In addition, Mississauga is well centered in the Greater Toronto Area, very well connected and is also home to many Fortune 500 companies which have been key considerations for our expansion. “

Infosys – recently announced plans to create 500 new jobs in Mississauga over the next three years. The new hires will be concentrated in the company’s new digital development center, located in Mississauga, which provides research and development and engineering services to clients across North America. In response to growing demand for training, retraining and apprenticeship from employers, Infosys plans to double its Canadian workforce to 4,000 employees by 2023.

“Global technology companies landing in Mississauga are welcomed into a conducive business environment with the assistance of the City of Mississauga’s Economic Development Office (EDO) taking a partnership-for-business approach,” said Bonnie Brown, Director of the Economic Development Office “With a dedicated team of business development professionals, EDO offers a variety of services to help businesses set up operations and make the right connections for success in the North American market. “

To learn more about advancements in Mississauga’s ICT sector, visit thefutureisunlimited.ca/industries/ict.

About Mississauga:

Mississauga is at the heart of Canada’s innovation and technology activity and continues to attract the brightest minds and cutting-edge companies. From start-ups to international companies, Mississauga has the support, resources and community to cultivate growth, success and global impacts within the industry.

Media contact:

Carley smith
Supervisor, Media and Public Information
City of Mississauga
905-615-3200, ext. 4203
Carley.Smith@mississauga.ca
TTY: 905-896-5151


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Today’s coronavirus news: PM consults the opposition on how the House of Commons should resume its activities; Europe is the only region with an increase in COVID-19 last week, according to WHO https://scbwicanada.org/todays-coronavirus-news-pm-consults-the-opposition-on-how-the-house-of-commons-should-resume-its-activities-europe-is-the-only-region-with-an-increase-in-covid-19-last-week-according-to-who/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 10:37:42 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/todays-coronavirus-news-pm-consults-the-opposition-on-how-the-house-of-commons-should-resume-its-activities-europe-is-the-only-region-with-an-increase-in-covid-19-last-week-according-to-who/ The latest coronavirus news in Canada and around the world Wednesday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available. 6:25 am: What do you call someone who graduates last in their class in medical school? Doctor. It’s an old joke, but the point is, not all who reach […]]]>

The latest coronavirus news in Canada and around the world Wednesday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available.

6:25 am: What do you call someone who graduates last in their class in medical school? Doctor. It’s an old joke, but the point is, not all who reach rank have the same level of insight. On Monday, two doctors were blamed by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario for selling fragile vaccines, masks and even COVID testing exemptions. Doctors, get well.

As of Tuesday, there were four of these charlatans on the register, and there are clearly more. This is a blatant violation of good medical practice, and in this time of plague, it is clearly a gap that must be filled. Then how ?

Read the full Star’s Bruce Arthur review here.

6:24 am: An Ontario mayor who has pushed misinformation about COVID-19 could lose part of his salary following a scathing report from an integrity commissioner.

West Lincoln Mayor David Bylsma is one of a small group of politicians from the fiercely conservative communities of western Niagara who have adopted anti-vaccination or anti-containment rhetoric. He is the only one to face sanctions from the political authorities of which he is a member.

First, his own council stripped him of most of his powers, and now the regional council that his town hall gives him the right to sit on will consider suspending his salary.

Bylsma’s decision earlier this year to ask St. Catharines woman Emily Spanton via Facebook whether the COVID-19 vaccine had an impact on her period was “alarmingly invasive”, “arguably insulting” and “irresponsible The Niagara Region Integrity Commissioner found in an Oct. 8 report.

Read the full story of Torstar’s Grant LaFleche here.

6:22 a.m .: Coronavirus deaths in Russia hit a new daily high on Wednesday as the spike in infections prompted Cabinet to suggest declaring a week off to stem the contagion.

The government task force reported 1,028 coronavirus deaths in the past 24 hours, the highest number since the start of the pandemic. This brought the total death toll to 226,353 – by far the highest in Europe.

Amid a spike in infections and deaths, Deputy Prime Minister Tatyana Golikova suggested introducing a period of leave starting October 30 and extending until the following week, when four days out of seven are already public holidays. The proposal has not yet been authorized by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The daily number of coronavirus deaths has been rising for weeks and topped 1,000 for the first time over the weekend amid slow vaccination rates, a lax public stance on precaution and reluctance government to tighten restrictions. About 45 million Russians, or 32% of the country’s nearly 146 million people, are fully immunized.

6:21 am: The Czech Republic has been hit by a sharp rise in coronavirus infections which have reached unprecedented levels since the end of April, the health ministry said on Wednesday.

The government was due to meet later today to approve new measures to curb the tide.

The daily increase in new cases reached 3,246 on Tuesday, more than double the cases a week ago from 1,507. It was the highest number since April 20.

New infections topped 100 per 100,000 people in seven days with 117 positive cases.

With the rapid rise in infections comes an increasing number of people requiring hospitalization and death.

6:20 am: The World Health Organization said there was a 7% increase in new coronavirus cases in Europe last week, the only region in the world where cases have increased.

In its weekly assessment of the pandemic released Tuesday evening, the United Nations health agency said there were around 2.7 million new cases of COVID-19 and more than 46,000 deaths last week, similar to figures reported the previous week. Britain, Russia and Turkey accounted for the largest number of cases.

The largest drop in COVID-19 cases was seen in Africa and the Western Pacific, where infections declined by around 18% and 16%, respectively. The death toll in Africa has also fallen by around a quarter, despite the continent’s severe vaccine shortage. Other regions, including the Americas and the Middle East, reported numbers similar to the previous week, the WHO said.

But for the third week in a row, coronavirus cases have jumped in Europe, with around 1.3 million new cases. More than half of countries in the region have reported an increase in their number of COVID-19, the WHO said.

Over the past week, Russia has repeatedly broken new daily records for COVID-19 cases and the number of infections in the UK has reached levels not seen since mid-July.

6:19 am: Statistics Canada is due to report this morning what the country’s headline inflation barometer recorded in September.

The consumer price index for August rose 4.1% from the same month a year earlier, marking the largest year-over-year increase since March 2003.

The pace of increases in August reflected the rebound in prices from lows seen a year earlier, increased consumer demand and supply chain bottlenecks that led to higher transportation costs. passed on to buyers.

RBC economists Nathan Janzen and Claire Fan say they expect an annual inflation rate of 4.2 percent in September, with housing and gasoline costs the main drivers.

They also write in a note that supply chain issues may be more persistent and over time fuel higher, longer-term inflation expectations for households and businesses.

Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem said the central bank would act to curb inflation if the current spike in price hikes appeared to become more than one-time pressure points.

6:18 am: It’s a spooky Halloween season for retailers scrambling to stock their shelves in time for the holidays.

Geoff Waszek, owner of Candy’s Costume Shop in Toronto, said he was wary of placing orders in January, as is customary in the industry for Halloween, lest another lockdown could void the festivities .

Once he started ordering, Waszek said he needed to source inventory from a patchwork of suppliers struggling with supply chain issues.

U.S.-based HalloweenCostumes.com, which ships direct to Canadian consumers, said many of the products ordered wouldn’t arrive even after the holidays.

Spokeswoman Ashley Theis said the company will just have to use the overdue items as stock for next year.

Retailers said supply shortages made it difficult to recover after a dismal 2020, when many did not celebrate Halloween due to the high number of COVID-19. This year, however, Waszek says he’s happy to see how excited people are to celebrate the holidays again.

6:15 am: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will continue today to consult with opposition leaders on how the House of Commons should resume its work and what the priorities should be once it is back up and running.

He is expected to have separate phone conversations with Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Greens House Leader Elizabeth May.

On Tuesday, he exchanged ideas on the resumption of Parliament with the leader of the Bloc Québécois Yves-François Blanchet.

The first on the agenda is whether the House of Commons should resume the hybrid sittings adopted to get through the COVID-19 pandemic or return to normal in-person operations.

It will likely be a touchy subject with O’Toole following a decision on Tuesday by the all-party Home Economy Council to allow only fully vaccinated people to be admitted to the House of Commons.

The Liberals, the Bloc Québécois and the NDP support all mandatory vaccinations and have declared that all their members have received two injections of approved vaccines; but O’Toole declined to say whether all of his 118 MPs are fully vaccinated and objected to making it mandatory.


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No major understaffing in nursing homes in southern Manitoba as workers’ vaccination deadlines take effect https://scbwicanada.org/no-major-understaffing-in-nursing-homes-in-southern-manitoba-as-workers-vaccination-deadlines-take-effect/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 00:53:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/no-major-understaffing-in-nursing-homes-in-southern-manitoba-as-workers-vaccination-deadlines-take-effect/ About 30 direct-care health workers were fired from their jobs on Monday for not being vaccinated or refusing to comply with COVID-19 testing on the first day those warrants came into effect, according to the province. Allyson Currie’s family are relieved that numbers have remained stable at Tabor Home in Morden, home to her 94-year-old […]]]>

About 30 direct-care health workers were fired from their jobs on Monday for not being vaccinated or refusing to comply with COVID-19 testing on the first day those warrants came into effect, according to the province.

Allyson Currie’s family are relieved that numbers have remained stable at Tabor Home in Morden, home to her 94-year-old mother, Velda Currie.

Tabor Home was one of at least three care homes in Morden, Winkler and Altona that described the worst-case scenario for families last week. If facilities faced shortages once the vaccine requirements for personal care home workers went into effect on October 18, relatives have been urged to consider coming in to care for residents or withdrawing them altogether.

“The first word that came to my mind was ‘alarming’. I thought, really, is that true?” Allyson said.

“The most worrying part was how are we going to do this and how safe is it going to be for mum… She’s here because we can’t take care of her.”

Allyson lives in Winnipeg but made the trip to visit her mother on Monday, just in case. Staffing levels appeared normal and the environment seemed as calm and pleasant as usual, she said.

Tabor Home, Salem Home and the Southern Health Region confirmed that “appropriate staffing levels” were maintained at those locations on Monday.

“These efforts will continue to ensure that staff are redeployed to support areas that may need additional assistance,” the joint statement read.

About 42,000 direct-care healthcare staff who work with patients, residents and clients were to be doubly vaccinated by Monday or undergo a COVID-19 test every 48 hours.

Shared Health, the organization that coordinates the delivery of health services in the province, said nearly 29,400 workers have been verified as vaccinated so far. Another 7,000 workers said they too were vaccinated, but the verification process continues.

As of Friday, around 1,800 workers were identified as unvaccinated and in need of testing.

Vaccination deadline for nursing home workers comes into effect

The vaccination deadline for health care, personal care homes and other public service employees took effect on Monday. 3:20

Shared Health says those who refused accommodation for the test would be suspended without pay.

This includes at least 30 direct care workers across the province who were fired from work Monday afternoon. This figure could change during the week.

Manitoba Health Minister Audrey Gordon said the 30 workers reside across the province. She said there had been no “disruption in service or staffing issues” on Monday, although she confirmed the province needed to replace locations where planned.

Three nursing homes that raised these concerns last week are all located in or near some of the province’s lowest vaccination areas in Southern Health, the region with the lowest overall rates.

This includes the Winkler Health District, where the rates were 43.1%, and the Stanley District, which surrounds the towns of Winkler and Morden, where the rates were 25.1%. Rates in the neighboring Altona health district were 53.4%.

Some workers demonstrate in Altona

The union that represents workers at Salem Home in Winkler and Tabor Home in Morden said there was no staff shortage on Monday.

In a letter to families on Monday, Tabor management said staff were stable but had temporarily extended the hours of operation of designated family caregivers, just in case this week.

There were, however, staff shortages at Eastview Place in Altona.

About nursing home staff sitting outside their workplace in Altona on Monday, Eastview Place, on day one, workers are required to be vaccinated or be tested for COVID-19 every 48 hours. (Samantha Samson / CBC)

CBC News spoke to eight of those staff who gathered outside Eastview with signs suggesting their charter rights were being violated due to vaccine warrants, as well as mandatory testing .

None of the workers wanted to do an interview with CBC News. They said there was no privacy in the facility as testing for unvaccinated staff takes place at the entrance to the building where others can see.

They said they felt discriminated against and forced to quit their jobs.

The Manitoba Human Rights Commission does not generally consider vaccination warrants to infringe rights enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Winkler mayor Martin Harder said he felt for families with loved ones at the three southern nursing homes.

“They cannot go and provide the services, otherwise they might already be transporting them to their homes,” he said.

Winkler Mayor Martin Harder encourages unvaccinated workers to at least get COVID-19 tests every 48 hours because “we have so many loved ones … who need them.” (Samantha Samson / CBC)

He is convinced that no one at Salem Home in Winkler will be left without care, be it healthcare workers or loved ones.

“My only concern is whether that would increase the risk of volunteers coming in to intervene,” said Harder.

He attended a small rally over the weekend of unvaccinated healthcare workers to connect with people. Many feared they were on the verge of losing their jobs, Harder said.

“It’s for their protection”

Harder said most people opposed to vaccines seemed to have strong beliefs on the issue. Those who opposed the testing seemed more upset with the drawbacks of it, he said.

Harder has struggled with what he sees as a “two tier society being built” between vaccinated and unvaccinated Manitobans.

He also says that those who choose not to be vaccinated always bear some responsibility to the community.

Harder wants unvaccinated healthcare workers to undergo routine testing.

“I would just encourage them to make sure they don’t quit their jobs because we have so many loved ones who are in personal care homes, in hospitals, who need them,” Harder said. “It’s for their protection.”

About 30 unvaccinated direct care workers withdrew from work after refusing the test because

About 30 unvaccinated direct-care health workers were fired from their jobs on Monday for also refusing to be tested. October 18 was the deadline for thousands of public employees to be vaccinated or tested every 48 hours. 2:12


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La Niña is back. Will it bring more snow to NJ this winter? https://scbwicanada.org/la-nina-is-back-will-it-bring-more-snow-to-nj-this-winter/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/la-nina-is-back-will-it-bring-more-snow-to-nj-this-winter/ For the second year in a row, a natural climate regime known as La Niña has developed, and forecasters say it could have a big influence on the upcoming winter season in the United States and possibly the remaining weeks of hurricane season in the Atlantic. The re-emergence of La Niña – which is described […]]]>

For the second year in a row, a natural climate regime known as La Niña has developed, and forecasters say it could have a big influence on the upcoming winter season in the United States and possibly the remaining weeks of hurricane season in the Atlantic.

The re-emergence of La Niña – which is described as “double dip ”by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration due to its arrival in consecutive years – was triggered by colder than average temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean.

More people may be familiar with the reverse pattern – El Niño, which occurs when water temperatures in the central Pacific are warmer than average. But El Niño and La Niña conditions play a key role in shaping weather patterns not only in the United States but around the world.

Experts say a strong El Niño tends to cause more wind shear in the Atlantic hurricane basin, limiting the formation and strength of tropical storms and hurricanes. A strong La Niña tends to favor storm patterns with less wind shear, which facilitates the development and strengthening of tropical systems in the Atlantic.

So, will La Niña’s return play a role in the remaining weeks of the 2021 hurricane season? NOAA experts Climate Prediction Center say it’s possible, although the Atlantic hurricane basin – the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico – remains very calm at the moment with no major storms brewing.

The hurricane season officially ends until November 30, and this season has already been very active, with 20 named storms.

Here’s what a La Nina climate model looks like, with cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures along the equator in the tropical Pacific in September 2021. The trend continued into October, and NOAA says La Nina will likely persist through the winter season. from 2021-2022.NOAA

Impact on winter conditions

In terms of its impact on winter conditions, a La Niña climate model tends to generate colder, snowier winters in the far north of the United States and warmer, drier winters in the southern United States. United.

However, its impact on regions of the northeast and central Atlantic, including New Jersey, is not as constant as in other parts of the country, according to several weather experts, including the climatologist of the ‘State of New Jersey, David Robinson.

“We’re just in a place where we’re stuck between areas where the signals are more consistent,” Robinson said before last year’s La Niña model.

During winters dominated by a La Niña pattern, Robinson noted that “the Ohio Valley and the Great Lakes tend to be wetter than average and the southeast drier. We’re in between, with most of the favorable La Niña rainfall near average, not tilting to an extreme in either direction. “

Forecasters of WeatherWorks, based in Warren County, has analyzed La Niña winters since the late 1980s and found that a strong La Niña pattern typically results in milder winters for the New Jersey area, typically resulting in falls of average or below average snowfall. During some La Niña winters, however, the Garden State was hit by heavy snowfall.

Last winter – when another La Niña model was active – classified as New Jersey’s 29th Warmest Winter on Record, according to Robinson’s weather database at Rutgers University, which dates back to 1895. But winter was also very snowy, with the exception of January.

Statewide, New Jersey was covered with an average of 29.9 inches of snow last winter, almost 10 inches more than normal.

So, will this winter be a repeat, with different La Niña weather and lots of snow in the Garden State?

Jim Sullivan, long-term forecaster at WeatherWorks, thinks a lot depends on whether the jet stream pattern this winter is keeping a lot of cold air trapped in Canada and the northern Rockies. This scenario would limit the amount of snow that falls in the eastern United States, as well as in the central region, Sullivan notes in his early winter outlook for 2021-2022.

Although he sees similarities between last year’s La Niña model – which was considered to have moderate strength – and the looming one this year, which is preferred as minor to moderate, Sullivan said temperatures might not be as hot as they were last winter. .

“My hunch is that it will probably be a slightly colder winter than last year,” Sullivan told NJ Advance Media on Friday. “If it’s colder than last winter, that certainly opens the door” to more snow than average.

However, he added, “if the cold air remains locked in (in the northern Rockies and in Canada) it could limit our possibilities for snow.”

Current weather radar

Thank you for relying on us to provide the local weather news you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a voluntary subscription.

Len Melisurgo can be contacted at LMelisurgo@njadvancemedia.com.


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The pandemic continues to slow: https://scbwicanada.org/the-pandemic-continues-to-slow/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 11:57:46 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-pandemic-continues-to-slow/ The coronavirus pandemic has slowed for a seventh consecutive week around the world. Here is the overall inventory based on an AFP database. In decline The number of new daily cases fell 5% globally to 403,300, according to an AFP tally as of Thursday. The pandemic had gained ground since mid-June, fueled by the highly […]]]>

The coronavirus pandemic has slowed for a seventh consecutive week around the world.

Here is the overall inventory based on an AFP database.

In decline

The number of new daily cases fell 5% globally to 403,300, according to an AFP tally as of Thursday.

The pandemic had gained ground since mid-June, fueled by the highly contagious Delta variant, but since the end of August, it has been in decline.

Confirmed cases reflect only a fraction of the actual number of infections, with counting practices and testing levels varying by country.

Europe trendy bucks

This week saw improvement in most parts of the world, with 23% fewer cases in Africa, 21% fewer in Latin America and the Caribbean, 19% fewer in the Middle East, 16% fewer in Asia and 14% less in the United States. United States and Canada region.

Europe, however, reversed the trend with an increase of 13%, while the number of cases rose 11% in Oceania.

The biggest peaks

Georgia, where only 27% of the population received a dose of the vaccine, saw the largest increase in the number of new cases, with an increase of 79%.

Beyond the Caucasus, the biggest increases for the week were in Europe, with cases increasing by half in Ireland and 49% in the Netherlands, where more than 66% of the population has already received two doses. vaccine. Cases rose 42 percent in Poland and Latvia.

The biggest drops

At the other end of the spectrum, Israel saw the largest decline with a 48% drop in the number of cases, followed by Cuba (32% fewer), Guatemala (31% decline), Costa Rica (29 % decrease) and Vietnam, where cases fell by a quarter.

The United States has most of the infections… –

The United States remained by far the country with the highest number of new cases, at 86,800 per day, a drop of 14%. It was followed by the United Kingdom with 38,700, an increase of 13%, and Turkey, 30,500, an increase of 5%.

On a per capita basis, the country with the most new cases this week was Latvia with 623 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, ahead of Serbia (598) and Georgia (585).

… and most deaths –

The United States also recorded the highest number of deaths per day with 1,563, followed by Russia with 967 and Mexico 350.

Globally, the number of daily deaths continued to decline to 6,741, a drop of 6%.

Vaccination

Cuba is leading the vaccination race among countries with more than one million people, immunizing 1.92 percent of its population every day.

Iran followed with 1.57 percent, New Zealand with 1.46 percent, Lebanon (1.24 percent), South Korea (1.22 percent) and Vietnam (1.20 percent).

The United Arab Emirates and Portugal have the most advanced vaccination campaigns, having fully immunized 86% and 85% of their population respectively. Spain and Singapore follow with 78 percent each.


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5 COVID-19 outbreaks in Waterloo region schools, but community case rates are ‘fairly stable’ https://scbwicanada.org/5-covid-19-outbreaks-in-waterloo-region-schools-but-community-case-rates-are-fairly-stable/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:39:50 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/5-covid-19-outbreaks-in-waterloo-region-schools-but-community-case-rates-are-fairly-stable/ Five schools in the Waterloo region experienced outbreaks of COVID-19 on Tuesday, according to public health reports. The schools were: Woodland Christian High School in Breslau with six cases across multiple cohorts. JF Carmichael Public School in Kitchener with three cases. Hespeler Public School in Cambridge with two cases. Parkway Public School in Cambridge with […]]]>

Five schools in the Waterloo region experienced outbreaks of COVID-19 on Tuesday, according to public health reports.

The schools were:

  • Woodland Christian High School in Breslau with six cases across multiple cohorts.
  • JF Carmichael Public School in Kitchener with three cases.
  • Hespeler Public School in Cambridge with two cases.
  • Parkway Public School in Cambridge with two cases.
  • Grand River Collegiate Institute in Kitchener with two cases.

None of the schools have been closed. There was also a day care center with an outbreak of three cases.

Dr Hsiu-Li Wang, the region’s medical officer of health, said on Tuesday that outbreaks in local schools remained limited.

“The cases in school-aged children, for the most part, reflect the spread of the virus in our community at large,” Wang told regional advisers at a committee meeting.

“The best way to protect those under 12 who are not yet vaccinated is, one, to vaccinate everyone around them and two, to keep the spread low in the community.”

Overall, however, Wang said case rates in the Waterloo region have remained “fairly stable.”

19 new cases in 2 days

Waterloo Region Public Health reported 19 cases over two days as officials did not update the region’s dashboard on Monday due to the holidays. Nine cases were reported on Monday and 10 cases on Tuesday.

No new deaths have been reported.

The region’s immunization dashboard showed that 89.9% of people aged 12 and older received one dose of the vaccine while 85.5% received two.

Wang said there are around 77,000 people in the region who are eligible for vaccination but who are not yet fully immunized. In addition, 82,000 children under 12 are not yet eligible for the vaccine.


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The rule of the French language shakes the students https://scbwicanada.org/the-rule-of-the-french-language-shakes-the-students/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 01:13:24 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-rule-of-the-french-language-shakes-the-students/ 1 / 1 Many students applied for the English component and therefore failed to meet the French language criterion in Quebec. The lack of knowledge of local rules has led hundreds of Indian students, who have applied for permanent residence (PR) in Quebec, province of Canada, to have their dreams shattered. Their applications were rejected […]]]>

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Many students applied for the English component and therefore failed to meet the French language criterion in Quebec.

The lack of knowledge of local rules has led hundreds of Indian students, who have applied for permanent residence (PR) in Quebec, province of Canada, to have their dreams shattered. Their applications were rejected on the grounds that they had not opted for the French language, which is a prerequisite. This is not the case in other regions of Canada.

The mistake that cost students the Canadian PR. They applied for the English language stream and therefore did not meet the French language requirements in Quebec. Those who applied for PR are mostly students who entered the country on a student visa and obtained Temporary Resident (TR) status. Their requests were rejected and they may have to return to India.

Anuj (name changed) was shocked when his PR request was rejected. He went to Canada on a student visa to study business administration. “Instead of big cities like Toronto, Ontario, I preferred Quebec. But I didn’t know I wouldn’t qualify for this. He says his parents have contacted agents in India and they are also unable to explain it.

Quebec being a French colony, language is a key factor for immigration. Students applying for PR might have simply selected French downstream when the English quota has been filled.
–Hemant Shah, Director, Overseas Friends of India

Anuj said some of his classmates were also facing a similar situation. “Canada has always been a friendly country, but now we are faced with a horrible situation. I don’t know anything about my future and I’m scared, “he said. He is originally from Ahmedabad and went to Canada after completing his Bachelor of Commerce degree.

Canada Immigration had invited 40,000 PR requests after which it was to be closed.

Hemant Shah, who runs Overseas Friends of India in Canada and director of Canada-India trade and marketing relations, said it was a warning signal for parents and students flocking to Canada. . “They should contact the appropriate immigration consultants and then plan for the change. Western Canada has a lot of opportunities and there are also job prospects. It is an untapped market. But people don’t do their homework and limit themselves to Toronto and other areas. These cities have become saturated and there are very few opportunities, ”he said.

Shah, who has lived in Canada for 40 years, said that Quebec being a French colony, language is a key factor for immigration. Students applying for PR might have simply chosen French downstream when the English language quota has been filled. And when we ask them to take a French test, they obviously fail.

The situation is such that students do not have enough work permits to follow another Canadian immigration program. The time limit is also a constraint and they have no choice but to return to India.

“There are many good immigration lawyers in Canada who can help students get public relations and their fees are not very high either,” he said. Now, with many Afghan refugees also being hosted in the country, things could get more difficult in the coming days, he said.


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Vaccination mandate likely for teachers and school staff although details of implementation are undecided https://scbwicanada.org/vaccination-mandate-likely-for-teachers-and-school-staff-although-details-of-implementation-are-undecided/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 00:21:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/vaccination-mandate-likely-for-teachers-and-school-staff-although-details-of-implementation-are-undecided/ All signs point to a vaccination mandate for teachers and school staff in British Columbia, but details of how and who should implement it are still in question. The province’s association of school trustees and the teachers’ federation both say they support a vaccination mandate to protect students and school staff, but they want the […]]]>

All signs point to a vaccination mandate for teachers and school staff in British Columbia, but details of how and who should implement it are still in question.

The province’s association of school trustees and the teachers’ federation both say they support a vaccination mandate to protect students and school staff, but they want the provincial government to order it.

The province said it was up to elected school trustees and BC’s 60 school districts to come up with their own vaccination mandates for school staff.

Teri Mooring, president of the BC Teachers’ Federation, noted that immunization rates are lower in parts of the province, such as the Peace region in the north, so administrators may face “a high level. reluctance “to demand that teachers be vaccinated. as a condition of employment.

“We might have a situation where the parts of the province that need mandates the most are the least likely to implement them,” Mooring said, adding that a patchwork approach could affect all unvaccinated teachers working in multiple areas. districts.

At a press conference Thursday, Premier John Horgan said vaccination warrants for BC school workers are a last resort and elected board trustees know what their communities need instead. than the province that implements such decisions.

WATCH: Prime Minister John Horgan speaks out on vaccine mandate for schools

“I think it will be done as soon as possible,” Horgan says of school staff vaccination mandate

BC Premier John Horgan says he is confident school districts will be heading towards a “very, very soon” mandate. 1:07

“We [have been] working with K-12 stakeholders to build trust and we need to make sure provincial school districts all have a say in how we do it, ”Horgan said.

His remarks came after the province announced on Tuesday that vaccination will be mandatory for thousands of British Columbia’s public service workers and visitors to many healthcare facilities, including long-term and assisted care. .

Calls for vaccination warrants for school staff are on the rise as new models show COVID-19 cases on the rise in children under 12 as the fourth wave of the pandemic continues.

Mooring said the teachers ‘union sent a letter to its 45,000 members Thursday night saying its leaders plan to meet with the BC Public School Employers’ Association and the Department of Education to ensure that a provincial mandate of vaccine would include a process to welcome teachers and protect their rights through grievances if necessary.

According to BC School Trustees Association president Stephanie Higginson, school boards were hoping to have a vaccination mandate in place for school workers by September.

Now, she says, they just want it to be in place ASAP.

BC School Trustees Association president Stephanie Higginson said the association has been asking the government for help since June on how to implement a school vaccination mandate. (Association of School Trustees of British Columbia)

“The details of how and what are… one of those fine details that we have to work out,” Higginson said on CBC Friday. The first edition. “We need to find out what support we have from the province… and we need to make sure we can do it quickly. “

Mooring, meanwhile, recommended that teachers and school staff get vaccinated, as the union may not be able to help them unless they have a legitimate exemption, if the province requires that they are vaccinated.

School counselors are not medical experts

Mission school board chairperson Tracy Loffler said she was not sure school trustees should be making decisions about immunization mandates.

“We are not doctors, we are not epidemiologists,” she said.

“Boards are well equipped to make decisions about student achievement… Should these people be making medical decisions?

Loffler says the board has been “very deliberate” to follow the orders and advice of public health officials and experts in the province, and is seeking more advice on whether to implement a mandate of vaccine for staff in the Mission district.

The mission is in the Fraser Valley region where new restrictions were recently announced after an increase in the number of people diagnosed with COVID-19 – especially among those who are not vaccinated.

Meanwhile, an independent modeling group analyzing the pandemic in British Columbia says cases in children have risen sharply in the Fraser Valley, Interior and Vancouver Island health authority regions, because they represent almost half of the unvaccinated residents of the province.

He predicts that at least 20% of those under 12 will be infected with the COVID-19 virus within two years.

On Thursday, Horgan said he had been briefed by provincial health officer Dr Bonnie Henry that Health Canada would soon be reviewing vaccination plans for children aged five to 11 and officials are working on the logistics of delivery of these vaccines once approved.


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Boats, cars, couriers: drugs are coming to Cape Breton in multiple ways, police say https://scbwicanada.org/boats-cars-couriers-drugs-are-coming-to-cape-breton-in-multiple-ways-police-say/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/boats-cars-couriers-drugs-are-coming-to-cape-breton-in-multiple-ways-police-say/ This story is part of a CBC Cape Breton series that examines illicit drug use on the island. Click here to read more stories in this series. Cocaine shipped by courier or stuffed in luggage. Packages surreptitiously thrown into the ocean and transported ashore by fishing boats using a set of coordinates. Cape Breton Regional […]]]>

This story is part of a CBC Cape Breton series that examines illicit drug use on the island. Click here to read more stories in this series.

Cocaine shipped by courier or stuffed in luggage. Packages surreptitiously thrown into the ocean and transported ashore by fishing boats using a set of coordinates.

Cape Breton Regional Police said cocaine was arriving on the island by several routes.

“Like the movie Planes, Trains and Automobiles, you know, there are many ways to get here because we’re an island, ”said Constable John Campbell, who spent four years working with the department’s street crime unit.

“We see pure cocaine when it comes in, when it is brought into the island, then when it is transmitted to the different levels of trafficking, and then it is cut off accordingly.”

A glimpse into the history of drug trafficking in Cape Breton shows that smugglers are active on the island best known for its rugged beauty, sprawling coastline and mountain views.

In Campbell’s opinion, the most common way to transport drugs is to have them driven to Sydney from Halifax.

Cape Breton Regional Police recovered $ 200,000 worth of drugs, including pure cocaine and prescription pills, from two Sydney residences last June. (Submitted by Cape Breton Regional Police)

In addition to that, there are the Marine Atlantic ferries that commute annually for approximately 300,000 passengers between North Sydney, NS. and Newfoundland.

“You look at Marine Atlantic and all these RVs in the summer and the semi-trailers and the containers and everything, you would be naive to think that there is no smuggling of a certain amount in these, that this either tobacco, cocaine, marijuana, firearms. Campbell said.

The history of the seizures of the island

Large cocaine seizures have been reported in Cape Breton over the past 20 years, including in the summer of 2004, when police found $ 10 million worth of stimulant hidden on a ship in Sydney Harbor.

Police found another $ 1.4 million worth of cocaine in the backpack of a Winnipeg man in 2010 as he attempted to board a Marine Atlantic ferry in North Sydney.

At that time, local police reported the bust as the largest in their department’s history. That same year, the very first organized crime charges were laid in the Cape Breton Regional Municipality with 16 people accused of being part of an elaborate drug ring.

A car speeds past a sign advising motorists how to get to the Marine Atlantic ferry terminal in North Sydney. (Erin Pottie / CBC)

Another case related to the ferry service dates back to 2016, when security guards discovered two kilograms of cocaine allegedly in a passenger’s suitcase at the North Sydney ferry terminal after being selected for a random check.

A Nova Scotia judge later ruled that the search violated Ontario human Charter rights because he was unlikely to know he could have refused the search. A drug charge against the man was subsequently dismissed.

A year later, in 2017, the Nova Scotia RCMP announced the results of an international investigation that began in Cape Breton and known as Operation Halfpenny.

The nearly two-year investigation uncovered a conspiracy to import into Canada more than a ton of cocaine from Colombia. Three Cape Breton men were charged with trafficking, with RCMP claiming the cocaine was destined for the streets of Nova Scotia and the provinces of Canada.

Small ports an attractive choice

When it comes to importing cocaine, small ports such as North Sydney might be seen as an attractive choice.

“Atlantic Canada is not necessarily a big market for drugs, but it is a major entry point or conduit for cocaine from Colombia or Mexico,” said Stephen Schneider, criminologist at the St. Mary’s University in Halifax.

Schneider, who has been researching organized crime since the late 1980s, said large amounts of cocaine arrive in Canada in two ways, either through land entry points along the Canada-U.S. Border or by seaports and sea container shipments.

In particular, Schneider said sea ferries are seen as an easier place to avoid law enforcement and control.

Stephen Schneider is Associate Professor of Criminology at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax. (Photo submitted)

“Certainly the bad guys are always looking for ways to get around law enforcement and avoid the big sea container ports or use sea ferries as a way to get around that,” he said.

“There is a lot less safety aboard Marine Atlantic ferries, or any ferry for that matter.

CBC News sent interview requests to Marine Atlantic and Transport Canada, which oversees its safety regulations, and both requests were turned down.

Marine Atlantic spokesperson Darrell Mercer released a statement saying the crown corporation is undertaking a random check at its terminals.

Mercer said any problem related to illegal activity is “directed to the appropriate authorities for follow-up and investigation.”

Carrying out a losing battle

Schneider describes a David versus Goliath situation when asked about stopping the flow of drugs to Canada.

“Law enforcement is really a losing battle because we simply don’t have the resources to effectively screen every sea container passing through a port, let alone detect drugs on the port. [them],” he said.

“It’s really just a punch. You can spend years and hundreds of thousands and millions of dollars trying to break down a large drug trafficking organization, and then 10 more will appear in a vacuum.”

Instead of focusing their attention on stopping drug trafficking, Schneider suggests governments spend more money on helping people.

“The best investment we can make to fight street drugs is to reduce demand by increasing our health care resources and our mental health and addiction resources,” he said.

“There are some battles won, but in general we have lost the war on drug trafficking and organized crime. And the real hope is just to try to control it and minimize the damage. But even that is an extremely difficult thing to do. “

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