Canada regions – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 23:29:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png Canada regions – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 Regional AIDS committee plans emergency food pantry for food insecure clients https://scbwicanada.org/regional-aids-committee-plans-emergency-food-pantry-for-food-insecure-clients/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 18:20:06 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/regional-aids-committee-plans-emergency-food-pantry-for-food-insecure-clients/ In an effort to support customers struggling with food insecurity, the AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area (ACCKWA) wants to create a new emergency food pantry. The nonprofit organization is currently raising $5,000 to purchase a fridge and freezer for the program. Greg Mann, support services coordinator at ACCKWA, said the organization has […]]]>

In an effort to support customers struggling with food insecurity, the AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area (ACCKWA) wants to create a new emergency food pantry.

The nonprofit organization is currently raising $5,000 to purchase a fridge and freezer for the program. Greg Mann, support services coordinator at ACCKWA, said the organization has been providing food support to its clients for 20 years in the form of baskets.

This emergency food pantry will be set up like a small marketplace so people “make choices for themselves and we don’t decide what’s good for them,” Mann said.

Mann said they hope the pantry fills a need, as inflation and rising food prices have made it even harder for people to access fresh food.

“The one thing that doesn’t increase with the cost of everything else is [Ontario Disability Support Program] and [Ontario Works]so we’re trying to fill the void so that people don’t have to decide whether or not they should take medicine, pay rent, or have food in their stomachs,” he said.

one-stop shop for customers

The food pantry will be supported with help from the Waterloo Region Food Bank, which has also seen an increase in the number of people needing support, interim CEO Kim Wilhelm said.

“What we’re seeing over the past two months is a very steady increase of about 5% every month in those who have access to emergency food assistance here in Waterloo Region,” Wilhelm said.

Nearly 35,000 people in the region have needed emergency food assistance over the past year, 35% of whom were under 18 years old.

Wilhelm said there are many reasons a person may need to access the food bank, such as sudden job loss, illness in the family, or extra charges at the gas pump and car. ‘grocery.

ACCKWA chief executive Ruth Cameron said many clients living with HIV need nutrient-dense foods like whole vegetables and fruits to stay healthy. She hopes to open the pantry soon to meet the growing need and make it as accessible as possible.

“Transportation is expensive,” Cameron said, adding that if people were already coming to the office for programming, then they could talk to staff about accessing the emergency pantry at the same time.

“So a one-stop shop is convenient, it’s accessible and sometimes makes things more affordable too.”

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Fiona rushes to Atlantic Canada with heavy rain and wind: NPR https://scbwicanada.org/fiona-rushes-to-atlantic-canada-with-heavy-rain-and-wind-npr/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 10:04:45 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/fiona-rushes-to-atlantic-canada-with-heavy-rain-and-wind-npr/ A pedestrian protects himself with an umbrella on Friday as he walks along the Halifax waterfront as rain falls before Hurricane Fiona makes landfall. Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via AP hide caption toggle caption Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via AP A pedestrian protects himself with an umbrella on Friday as he walks along the Halifax […]]]>

A pedestrian protects himself with an umbrella on Friday as he walks along the Halifax waterfront as rain falls before Hurricane Fiona makes landfall.

Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via AP


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Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via AP


A pedestrian protects himself with an umbrella on Friday as he walks along the Halifax waterfront as rain falls before Hurricane Fiona makes landfall.

Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via AP

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia – Rain and strong winds battered Atlantic Canada as Fiona closed in early Saturday as a large and powerful post-tropical cyclone, and Canadian forecasters warned it could s act of one of the strongest storms in the country’s history.

Fiona turned from a hurricane into a post-tropical storm on Friday evening, but meteorologists warned it could still experience hurricane-force winds and bring torrential rains and huge waves.

More than 250,000 Nova Scotia Power customers – about half of all customers in the province – were affected by outages just after 1 a.m. local time. The tally increased by another 28,000 by the end of the hour.

The fast-moving Fiona was expected to make landfall in Nova Scotia before dawn on Saturday, with its power lower than the Category 4 power it had early Friday when passing through Bermuda, although authorities have not reported no serious damage.

The Canadian Hurricane Center has issued a hurricane watch for the coastal stretches of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Fiona is expected to reach the region as a “large, powerful post-tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds.”

“It’s going to get ugly,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who decided to delay his trip to Japan for the funeral of slain former prime minister Shinzo Abe.

“We sure hope there won’t be much to do, but we think there probably will be,” Trudeau said. “Listen to instructions from local authorities and hang in there for the next 24 hours.”

The US Hurricane Center said Fiona was at Category 2 strength Friday night, with maximum sustained winds of 105 mph (169 kph). It was centered about 140 miles (220 kilometers) southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia, heading northeast at 46 mph (74 kph).

Hurricane-force winds extended out to 185 miles (300 kilometers) from the center and tropical storm-force winds extended out to 345 miles (555 kilometers).

“This is definitely going to be one of, if not the strongest, tropical cyclone to affect our part of the country,” said Ian Hubbard, meteorologist at the Canadian Hurricane Center in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. “It’s definitely going to be as bad and as bad as anything I’ve seen.”

Hubbard said the storm was weakening as it moved over cooler waters, and he estimated it highly unlikely to make landfall with hurricane force.

Post-tropical cyclones can pack hurricane-force winds

Hurricanes in Canada are quite rare, in part because once the storms reach colder waters, they lose their main source of energy. But post-tropical cyclones can still have hurricane-force winds, although they have a cold core and no visible eyes. They also often lose their symmetrical shape and look more like a comma.

“Still solid. But it’s getting very scary,” Cape Breton Regional Municipality mayor Amanda McDougall told The Associated Press.

Locals rushed to stock up on essentials and worked to protect their properties from storms on Friday.

At the Samsons Enterprises shipyard in the small Acadian community of Petit-de-Grat on Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island, Jordan David helped his friend Kyle Boudreau moor Boudreau’s “Bad Influence” lobster boat.

“All we can do is hope for the best and prepare as best we can. There is something coming, and how much is yet to be determined,” David said, dressed in his waterproof gear. outside.

Bob Robichaud, warning preparedness meteorologist for the Canadian Hurricane Center, said Fiona is shaping up to be a bigger storm system than Hurricane Juan, which caused extensive damage in the Halifax area in 2003. .

He added that Fiona was about the same size as post-tropical storm Dorian in 2019. “But it’s stronger than Dorian was,” he said. “It will certainly be a historic and extreme event for Eastern Canada.”

Christina Lamey, spokeswoman for the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, said Sydney’s Center 200 sports arena was open Friday evening to accommodate residents who wanted to evacuate their homes during the storm. Halifax has announced that it will open four evacuation centers.

Prince Edward Island officials have sent an emergency alert to phones warning of the possibility of severe flooding on the province’s north shore. “Immediate efforts should be made to protect property. Avoid shorelines, waves are extremely dangerous. Residents of these areas should be prepared to relocate if necessary,” the alert reads.

Nova Scotia authorities also sent an emergency alert to phones warning of Fiona’s arrival and urging people to say inside, avoid the shore, charge devices and have enough supplies. for at least 72 hours. Officials warned of prolonged power outages, wind damage to trees and structures, coastal flooding and possible road washouts.

So far Fiona has been charged with at least five deaths – two in Porto Ricotwo in the Dominican Republic and one in Guadeloupe.

Meanwhile, the National Hurricane Center said New Tropical Storm Ian in the Caribbean is expected to continue to strengthen and hit Cuba early Tuesday like a hurricane and then hit southern Florida early Wednesday.

It was centered about 385 miles (620 kilometers) southeast of Kingston, Jamaica. It had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 km/h) and was moving west-northwest at 12 mph (19 km/h). A hurricane watch has been issued for the Cayman Islands.

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The percentage of the population aged 65 and older and the growth rate of the number of seniors in some cities in British Columbia are increasing https://scbwicanada.org/the-percentage-of-the-population-aged-65-and-older-and-the-growth-rate-of-the-number-of-seniors-in-some-cities-in-british-columbia-are-increasing/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 01:25:24 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-percentage-of-the-population-aged-65-and-older-and-the-growth-rate-of-the-number-of-seniors-in-some-cities-in-british-columbia-are-increasing/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News The number of seniors in the 10 main cities of British Columbia increased by 17 to 24% between the 2016 and 2021 censuses The famous Parksville Beach, one of the attractions that has given the area one of the highest senior populations compared to other age groups anywhere in Canada. […]]]>

The number of seniors in the 10 main cities of British Columbia increased by 17 to 24% between the 2016 and 2021 censuses

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Seniors living in their own home in Campbell River who need transportation or help with errands will likely have to wait weeks to team up with a volunteer, says the woman who runs Campbell River Better at Home.

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Dilys Palmer says there is a strong demand for volunteers who provide basic non-medical services such as light housekeeping, running errands or simply keeping in touch with seniors who live alone in couples or alone.

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“He is definitely growing. We have quite a waiting list.

Palmer provides service in the Campbell River area, which includes the city of Vancouver Island and outlying areas. It is the region where the population of seniors has increased the most in British Columbia, by about 24%, between the 2016 and 2021 censuses, according to Statistics Canada figures released Wednesday.

“It’s a destination where a lot of people want to retire,” she says.

The Squamish area, with 22% growth, and the Nanaimo area, with just under 20%, were also among the top three on British Columbia’s list for a growing senior population. Seven others in the top 10 saw growth of at least 17%.

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Census figures show politicians, planners and developers where to expect growth as baby boomers retire and move to milder climates.

Figures released Wednesday also show what percentage of people in BC communities are 65 and older. The top three were the Parksville area at 47%, the Powell River area at 31% and the Penticton area at 30%. Seven others had at least 25% of their population aged 65 or over.

The national average is 19%, according to the 2021 census.

Parksville Mayor Ed Mayne said his city’s numbers were high because nearby retirement communities of Qualicum Beach and French Creek are included in StatCan’s numbers, but he said his city’s appeal for retirees is a “problem we have to solve”.

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He said residents in their prime working years ages 22 to 55 make up just 27% of Parksville’s population, below the provincial average of 48%.

The numbers confirm what his city already knows: it needs more families for the workforce.

He said baby boomers selling $2 million homes elsewhere can easily buy $1 million homes in his city, “but young families don’t have that advantage.”

“We are working very hard to attract young families,” he said, adding that the city would like to increase its stock of multi-unit residential buildings.

Wednesday’s figures showing a growing number of residents over the age of 65 should come as no surprise.

“Baby boomers make up a large part of the population and you could predict this was going to happen,” said Penny Gurstein, housing expert and professor emeritus at UBC’s School of Community and Regional Planning.

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The growing number of 65-year-olds, born in 1957 and nearing the end of the baby boom, should also cause provinces and municipalities to rethink the type of housing they build, she said.

She said baby boomers “will want a lot more control and autonomy” over their living arrangements.

She said long-term care homes came under scrutiny early in the COVID-19 pandemic as residents were susceptible to infection in their close quarters and even assisted living units. will likely be considered too institutional for many baby boomers.

The old model “doesn’t work” and housing for seniors where they make more of their own decisions is a model we don’t have, except perhaps for the wealthy, Gurstein said.

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British Columbia seniors’ advocate Isobel McKenzie, who was unavailable for an interview on Wednesday, is due to release her latest report, BC Seniors: Falling Further Behind, on Thursday on income and affordability issues for seniors in British Columbia.


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‘It’s a solemn moment’: Waterloo Region residents honor Queen Elizabeth II https://scbwicanada.org/its-a-solemn-moment-waterloo-region-residents-honor-queen-elizabeth-ii/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 02:08:04 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/its-a-solemn-moment-waterloo-region-residents-honor-queen-elizabeth-ii/ As people from around the world attend the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, residents of Waterloo Region and Guelph also gathered to pay their respects to Her Majesty. The Royal Canadian Legion Waterloo Branch 530 held a ceremony Monday morning at the Waterloo Cenotaph. Legion members said they wanted to pay tribute to the monarch […]]]>

As people from around the world attend the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, residents of Waterloo Region and Guelph also gathered to pay their respects to Her Majesty.

The Royal Canadian Legion Waterloo Branch 530 held a ceremony Monday morning at the Waterloo Cenotaph.

Legion members said they wanted to pay tribute to the monarch they served.

“It is a solemn moment that we are taking,” said local Legion President Bob Berg. “[The Queen] is a godmother to our legion and the name ‘royal’ was put there with her consent in the early 1960’s.”

Dozens of people gathered around the cenotaph as the Canadian national anthem was sung, followed by a moment of silence and a prayer for the Queen.

“She has done an admiral’s job of basically embracing the range of religious communities, despite her strong Christian faith,” said Paul Ellingham, pastor of the Waterloo Legion.

Pickers then placed wreaths and poppies around the cenotaph. The ceremony ended with the singing of God Save the King, now that Charles III is the head of state.

Meanwhile, a Kitchener retreat hosted a tea party for its residents. Tea and scones were served while the elderly wore crowns.

“It’s not just the story, but her style and what she represents as a woman, especially for the number of older women we have here,” said Krystie Zolnai, Business Advisor at Doon Village Retirement. Home.

Many locals called the queen “wonderful”.

“I swore my allegiance to the Queen when I joined the air force,” said one resident.

Another elderly person from Scotland said she had seen the Queen several times.

“I had been watching the motorcades, and I gave a little wave,” she said.

In Guelph, a cartoon of the monarch is painted on a storefront in downtown Guelph.

“It reminds me of her on the back of the train when she passed through Guelph when I was five,” said Guelph resident Russell McGladrey. “I waved and she waved back and looked me straight in the eye.”

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As pressures mount on home care in Canada, experts look abroad for solutions https://scbwicanada.org/as-pressures-mount-on-home-care-in-canada-experts-look-abroad-for-solutions/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/as-pressures-mount-on-home-care-in-canada-experts-look-abroad-for-solutions/ Black Art White Coat26:30The problem with home care (Part 1) Kirsten and David MacDonald’s life changed forever last year when Kirsten was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and David became her full-time carer. “A year and a half ago, Kirsten could run 5km, no problem. And so in a year and a half now, […]]]>

Black Art White Coat26:30The problem with home care (Part 1)

Kirsten and David MacDonald’s life changed forever last year when Kirsten was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and David became her full-time carer.

“A year and a half ago, Kirsten could run 5km, no problem. And so in a year and a half now, she has absolutely no use for her feet, arms and legs. And her voice is going. She’s about a week away from being non-verbal,” David said. White Coat, Black Art‘s Dr. Brian Goldman during a visit to their home in Ontario’s Muskoka region in August.

David, 61, has suspended his activity. Now he spends 14 hours a day caring for Kirsten, who is 55, in addition to caring for their six-year-old child.

One hope for the MacDonalds is home care, provided by provincially paid occupational therapists and personal support workers (PSWs).

A central agency has assessed their needs and approved them for home help, but the actual hours they get depend on staff availability.

The MacDonalds currently receive eight hours of PSW home care per week, half of what they were approved for.

“I think it’s incredibly awful,” Kirsten said. “I mean, I’m in a great position with a caring husband, but I can’t imagine what other people are going through.”

Dr. Samir Sinha says Denmark spends about twice as much on long-term care services as Canada. (Tiffany Foxcroft/CBC)

Several patients, home care providers and medical experts who spoke with White Coat, Black Art everyone agrees that we must rethink home care in Canada.

Otherwise, they warn, the current shortcomings will be felt more intensely and add further strain on already massively stressed ERs, hospitals and long-term care homes.

“Everything we have in our provinces and territories is funded based on maybe politics and necessity, instead of really looking at home care as an essential part of our system,” said the Dr. Samir Sinha, director of geriatrics at Sinai Health and the University Health Network in Toronto, who is developing a national seniors strategy for the National Institute on Aging.

Black Art White Coat26:29The cure for home care

The waiting list is growing

According to the Canadian Medical Association, nearly one million Canadians today rely on some form of home care. Half a million more people are expected to need it by the end of the decade. And by 2031, overall home care costs are expected to double.

Caryn Farnsworth, an occupational therapist based in Huntsville, Ont., helps the MacDonalds as needed.

Kirsten MacDonald needs and qualifies for many more hours than home care can currently provide. David put his business on hold to become his full-time carer. (Brian Goldman/CBC)

She does her best to help the situation in the few hours she is able to be there. During her visit with Dr. Goldman present, she asks Kirsten how many “good days” she’s had recently – a lot of them, Kirsten replies.

She helps David carry a brand new dresser, which she dubs “the Cadillac of dressers”, down to the ground floor of their house.

Like any other visit, it ends before long and she is on her way to visit another of her more than 80 clients scattered throughout the province’s Muskoka region.

Farnsworth spends about three to five hours a day – half of her work week – traveling between clients’ homes. The waiting list to see her can go up to a year.

Occupational therapist Caryn Farnsworth, left, and student Meghan Lees. Farnsworth spends about half of his working days traveling from client to client in the Muskoka region of Ontario. (Brian Goldman/CBC)

As one of only two occupational therapists in her agency serving the area, Farnsworth’s energy and resources are stretched thin. Rising gas prices have only increased the pressure on its spending.

“It’s extremely frustrating. I think home care is a critical part of our medical system that just doesn’t seem to be getting the funding and care that community members need,” Farnsworth said.

“I really want to stay at home”

Another Farnsworth client, Hali Camick, 52, lives in Kilworthy, Ont., a hamlet northeast of Sparrow Lake. She suffers from severe multiple sclerosis and an episode of COVID-19 made matters worse.

As a Mohawk woman from the Wahta First Nation, she is eligible for non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit. But it’s not enough.

Farnsworth, left, helps client Hali Camick, center, alongside personal support worker Colleen Western at Camick’s home in Kilworthy, Ont. (Brian Goldman/CBC)

“I really want to stay home. I have a son with special needs, and he’s with me too. Mom moved in a year ago, so she’s not getting any younger either,” she said . “Any help I can get would be great.”

“These stories break my heart because I hear them all the time,” Sinha said.

He fears that as people spend more and more time on waiting lists, their families could become exhausted caring for loved ones when they don’t have help from providers like Farnsworth and personal support workers – which is most of the time.

The Dutch “Buurtzorg”

Zayna Khayat, a futurist and adjunct professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, recently authored a pilot of a Canadian model of home care inspired by Buurtzorg, the name of both a system and a a non-profit organization in the Netherlands. .

The word Buurtzorg translates to “neighborhood model”. In Khayat’s pilot project, a patient’s care plan would be decided by family members and their nurse, rather than a central government agency.

Zayna Khayat is a futurist and adjunct professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management in the area of ​​health sector strategy. (Sarah Bodri)

Khayat says Ontario officials were on board, but interest and funding plummeted as home care visits dropped early in the COVID-19 pandemic. In the Netherlands, the Buurtzorg is nimble enough to give a patient more time when they need help the most, and reduce it when not needed, Khayat explained.

“They then receive a budget based on the needs of the patient…As long as they achieve the results, they decide how they want to orchestrate and use the budget,” she said.

Eventually, she hopes, “it’s going to be very unusual to go to these places called clinics and hospitals to get treatment, just like you don’t. [often] go to the bank to get cash.”

Khayat says the overall cost of the Buurtzorg model may cost more than a traditional home care model, but argues it produces better outcomes.

In his view, this is more cost-effective because it eliminates management-level expenses in favor of paying higher salaries to direct home care providers themselves.

The Danish model

Sinha said equal pay for healthcare providers, which is offered in Denmark, could provide part of the solution to this problem.

“It doesn’t matter where you work — as a personal support worker, as a nurse — number one, you actually get paid a respectful salary, which is important,” he explained.

Victor Stratton with his daughter Cheryl Stratton. Victor has Parkinson’s disease and received only occasional visits from home care providers as he spent months on a waiting list for a long-term care home. (Brian Goldman/CBC)

In the 1980s, Denmark shifted support from building new retirement homes to investing in home care. CBC Marketplace traveled to Denmark with Sinha earlier this year for a closer look at their healthcare model.

Denmark, Sinha explains, spends about twice as much on long-term care services as Canada. About two-thirds of this amount is spent on home care, with the remaining third being spent on nursing home care.

“Canada is the opposite,” he said. “We spend two-thirds of our spending on storing people in homes and only one-third on keeping them in their own homes.”

Cost of care

Following Denmark’s lead, Sinha argues, it would cost Canada less than continuing to build and plan long-term care homes.

“Our own Ministry of Health in Ontario has said that caring for someone in their own home, for example, who is eligible for long-term care, costs them about $100 a day. To care for her in a long-term care home, about $200 a day. And if they’re stuck in the hospital waiting for a long-term care bed, it’s about $750 a day,” he said.

In a statement to CBC Radio, Ontario’s Ministry of Health reiterated previous commitments, including investing $1 billion over three years in home care and the creation of Ontario Health Teams (OHTs). to provide “a new model of integrated care delivery” that includes home and community care. .

David and Kirsten MacDonald do their best to get by. But the costs of that care ran into the thousands of dollars, even with the help of the ALS company – including installing two chair lifts in their home, the aforementioned commode and a mechanized lift that Kirsten has to use, with assistance, to ascend and descend. the dresser.

It’s only a matter of time before David is forced to call 911 and rush Kirsten to the nearest hospital.


Produced by Amina Zafar and Colleen Ross.

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Off-label use of antipsychotics in nursing home patients not tracked in rural Manitoba https://scbwicanada.org/off-label-use-of-antipsychotics-in-nursing-home-patients-not-tracked-in-rural-manitoba/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/off-label-use-of-antipsychotics-in-nursing-home-patients-not-tracked-in-rural-manitoba/ A gap in Manitoba’s reporting system means the majority of nursing homes in the province cannot track the number of residents receiving antipsychotics without a diagnosis. Nearly a quarter of residents in Winnipeg’s 38 nursing homes are receiving these powerful drugs without being shown to need them clinically, a CBC survey has found. But the […]]]>

A gap in Manitoba’s reporting system means the majority of nursing homes in the province cannot track the number of residents receiving antipsychotics without a diagnosis.

Nearly a quarter of residents in Winnipeg’s 38 nursing homes are receiving these powerful drugs without being shown to need them clinically, a CBC survey has found.

But the extent of the problem in the other 87 homes across the province is unknown, as data is not collected and homes do not report those numbers publicly.

Melissa Marchischuk’s 87-year-old mother has dementia and lives in a Minnedosa nursing home.

For the past five years, her mother has been on the antipsychotic risperidone. She said her mother had not been diagnosed with a mental illness that the drug is supposed to treat.

“I think they’re just trying to put them to sleep,” Marchischuk told CBC News.

“But risperidone is not the right way to put them to sleep or calm them down.”

During the periods when her 87-year-old mother was not taking risperidone, Melissa Marchischuk says her dementia symptoms seemed to improve. (Simone Hogan/Shutterstock)

Antipsychotics like risperidone are used to treat a variety of mental health conditions, but primarily for those that include psychotic symptoms, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Risperidone can be used in the short term to treat severe dementias of the Alzheimer type, according to Health Canada.

Marchischuk said his mother could no longer walk and was in a reclining wheelchair. She needs to be fed and watered, and she doesn’t always make sense when she speaks.

But on occasions when she had to go to the hospital and was taken off all her medication, Marchischuk said her mother’s cognitive abilities improved.

“Once she gets better, she goes back to risperidone and all is lost,” Marchischuk said.

“When mum was on risperidone she was worse. Like the fears, and whatever the mind is going through with dementia, I felt worse.

The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority monitors residents who receive the medications without a diagnosis and reports them to the Canadian Institute for Health Information.

The Institute publish these figures every yearallowing Winnipeggers to see how each nursing home is performing and which prescribes the most off-label antipsychotics.

Provinces such as Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario also report these figures to the institute, allowing for a comprehensive analysis of antipsychotic use in nursing homes across the province.

According to a map from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Manitoba has no assessment of “potentially inappropriate” use of antipsychotics in long-term care homes. (CIHI)

The lack of data in Manitoba personal care homes outside of Winnipeg is problematic, says Dr. Samir Sinha, director of geriatrics at Sinai Health and University Health Network in Toronto.

“They might perform a lot better than Winnipeg. They might perform a lot worse. But when you don’t actually have data, you can’t really monitor what you don’t actually measure,” Sinha said.

Jon Gerrard, Manitoba Liberal Party health critic, agrees.

“People in rural areas [nursing] households are not second-class citizens. They deserve to have the same type of oversight and standards that the people of Winnipeg have,” he said.

Health regions outside of Winnipeg were able to provide an aggregate figure to show the total percentage of residents on antipsychotics. The figures show that the rates were much higher outside of Winnipeg.

The number does not separate those who are diagnosed with an illness that might require the drug from those who receive off-label drugs to treat dementia or control behavior.

They also don’t provide a breakdown of the percentage for each care home.


Percentage of residents on antipsychotics in July/August 2022:

  • Interlake East Regional Health Authority – 35.7%
  • Northern Health Region – 33.2%
  • Prairie Mountain Health – 31.6%
  • Southern Health – 29.5%
  • Winnipeg Regional Health Authority – 28.4%

Sinha says the public and medical professionals need to know all the information surrounding the use of these drugs so they can ask the right questions.

“In those settings where they have higher rates of prescribing antipsychotics, are there higher rates of diagnosed psychosis, for example, that would require those drugs?” he said.

“Is this a justifiable variation or is there something that tells us there is an opportunity to improve the quality of care provided?” He asked.

“[Or] another factor that may need to be better understood? »

Drug use monitored every 3 months: health regions

All four health regions outside of Winnipeg provided statements on how they monitor antipsychotic use in the home.

All told CBC News, in accordance with Manitoba Health policy, individual medication reviews are done every three months for each resident.

Often, the use of these drugs begins before the resident is admitted to a home, so getting the resident out requires a “structured approach,” a Prairie Mountain Health spokesperson said.

During the three-month medication reviews, residents are reassessed and “opportunities for dose reduction or discontinuation” are explored, according to a spokesperson for the Interlake-Eastern Regional Health Authority.

A woman in a brightly colored dress speaks into a microphone.
A spokesperson for Manitoba Health Minister Audrey Gordon declined to comment on whether the government would commit to changing the reporting structure of rural health regions on antipsychotic use in nursing homes. (CTV News Group)

When asked on Wednesday whether they would consider getting rural care homes to start tracking this, Health Minister Audrey Gordon said it was up to “clinicians”.

“If families feel there is a gap in the data collected or in the tracking of information, we can certainly inform the leaders of the region and the leaders of Shared Health,” she said.

Draper Houston, the minister’s spokesman, declined to comment on whether the government would commit to changing the reporting structure for rural health regions.

Instead, he made a brief statement that “all regional health authorities routinely review medications with patients.”

Marchischuk says it’s time for the rest of Manitoba to catch up to Winnipeg when it comes to reporting the use of these drugs.

“It has to be followed,” she said.

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Edmonton still on board with regional transit plan, city council agrees https://scbwicanada.org/edmonton-still-on-board-with-regional-transit-plan-city-council-agrees/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 00:12:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/edmonton-still-on-board-with-regional-transit-plan-city-council-agrees/ Edmonton has committed to putting in place a regional transit plan which is expected to start next spring. Council voted 10-3 Monday to support the first phase of the network linking seven municipalities to Edmonton on eleven routes. The system will connect Edmonton, Fort Saskatchewan, Spruce Grove, St. Albert, Leduc, Beaumont, Stony Plain and Devon. […]]]>

Edmonton has committed to putting in place a regional transit plan which is expected to start next spring.

Council voted 10-3 Monday to support the first phase of the network linking seven municipalities to Edmonton on eleven routes.

The system will connect Edmonton, Fort Saskatchewan, Spruce Grove, St. Albert, Leduc, Beaumont, Stony Plain and Devon.

It is estimated that the first phase will cost the City of Edmonton at least $7.2 million per year, but the Edmonton Transit Services Commission will present a specific budget in the fall.

Andrew Knack, Edmonton Council’s representative on the EMTSC, said the plan will provide transit alternatives to an area still dependent on the car.

“Without regional transit, everyone will continue to drive and one of the main causes of climate change will go unaddressed,” Knack said.

Erin Rutherford, councilor for Anirniq ward, said that despite lingering questions about each municipality’s contribution, she supports the move to a regional system and the first phase of the plan.

Although the cost will be up for debate in the fall, she noted.

“Depending on what that number comes back and depending on what other competing priorities we have for operational funds, I’m not going to commit today to actually fund that at budget time,” Rutherford said.

Some councilors objected

Aaron Paquette, along with Michael Janz and Jo-Anne Wright, voted against the plan as proposed.

Councilor Ward Dene said regional cooperation will be important in the long term, but the plan as presented has too many unanswered questions.

“We don’t have ridership numbers as a projection,” he said. “We have no idea who is going to use it how often,”

Some areas of Edmonton desperately need better service and should come before the city invests in a regional system, Paquette said.

“It’s really hard for me to go back to my community right now and say, ‘We’re investing more money in regional transit than we’re investing in local transit.'”

A draft map from the first phase shows eleven routes operating through the region. (Edmonton Transit Services Commission)

Knack said the plan includes improving service on some existing local routes provided by ETS.

“It actually adds hours of service to Edmonton. For me, it’s definitely better service, right now,” he said. “And that will help strengthen the region.”

In a memorandum of understanding in 2019, 13 municipalities were included in the plan. Strathcona County was the largest transit provider to pull out.

Some councilors have suggested that Edmonton could allocate part of the planned regional network budget to local routes.

Carrie Hotton-MacDonald, branch manager of Edmonton Transit Services, told the council on Monday that it would be possible to add weekend and off-peak service to existing routes or add bus service to neighborhoods currently in demand areas.

Professional anxieties

The operators for the regional links have not yet been chosen.

Mayor Amarjeet Sohi, a former bus driver, said he believed in a regional system but was worried about costs and the effect on staff.

Sohi said he hears transit operators’ concerns about their future work if the commission contracts out certain routes.

“There is real concern that their jobs will be privatized,” Sohi said. “Perceived or real, I don’t know, but they feel anxious.”

Hotton-MacDonald said staff talk about job security.

“They’re very, very, very worried about it,” she said.

“The anxiety isn’t just about the potential for privatization, there’s anxiety about no longer being a direct employee of the City of Edmonton.”

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Central Okanagan economy grapples with labor shortage – Kelowna Capital News https://scbwicanada.org/central-okanagan-economy-grapples-with-labor-shortage-kelowna-capital-news/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/central-okanagan-economy-grapples-with-labor-shortage-kelowna-capital-news/ Businesses in the central Okanagan appear to be facing a similar problem, with job vacancies leaving employers wondering where all the pre-pandemic workers have gone. The Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission (COEDC) can provide some insight into the current labor market climate, but there are no easy solutions to the current trend of economic uncertainty […]]]>

Businesses in the central Okanagan appear to be facing a similar problem, with job vacancies leaving employers wondering where all the pre-pandemic workers have gone.

The Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission (COEDC) can provide some insight into the current labor market climate, but there are no easy solutions to the current trend of economic uncertainty caused by national issues. and global markets, rising interest rates and post-COVID supply chain delays. .

Krista Mallory, COEDC manager, says the labor shortage trend is not unique to the central Okanagan, but there are relevant regional factors influencing it.

Mallory cites how from January to June this year, there was a 52% increase in job vacancies compared to the same period in 2021, reflecting a local economy emerging from the post-pandemic era, being the fastest growing metropolitan area in Canada as it found itself in the midst of a labor shortage.

“On top of that, we have one of the lowest unemployment rates in Canada, so yes, we’re growing faster than other parts of Canada, but that exacerbates some of the challenges we face locally,” he said. she declared.

This has been accompanied in our region by a demographic change in the population of people over 65, which has increased by 20% in the last five years.

“That’s comparable to the national rate change in this category of 18.3% as you start to see this global shift in baby boomers reaching retirement age, a trend that is expected to accelerate in the coming years,” Mallory said. said.

“And, we’re also seeing across the board after the pandemic that people are reassessing their plans and choosing to retire rather than continue working.”

Mallory refers to what others call “the great resignation”, where in addition to people retiring, workers change jobs or actively seek something new to do beyond what they have for. trained, creating a turbulent labor market.

“Another aspect on which there is no concrete data at this stage is that certain professions see former employees retraining and no longer in these fields. So we’re seeing more jobs and fewer people qualified to fill many of them,” she said.

But there are some economic benefits, Mallory cites, such as, coupled with the 20% growth in retired residents, there was also a 12.6% growth in 15-64 year olds from 2016 to 2021, a statistic important because it means more job seekers moving to the central Okanagan.

“That’s a lot because the average for that 15 to 64 year old group in British Columbia is 5.1%, and in Canada it’s 2.5%. Professionals and families are relocating to our region. It’s hard to attribute the reason to one thing, but it’s pretty clear that the word got out about Kelowna.

Mallory said where the COEDC office in Kelowna would receive business or employment inquiries primarily from residents or business investors in Alberta and the Lower Mainland, those inquiries are now coming from across Canada.

“One of the most noticeable things in recent years is the number of people moving here from Toronto, which we didn’t see happening before.”

She said the commercialization of the Okanagan lifestyle and the impact and career opportunities provided by the presence of UBC Okanagan and Okanagan College are driving strong growth in the region.

But again, tipping the scales to find a middle ground, Mallory acknowledged, it’s the cost of living in the Okanagan, primarily housing prices, that’s keeping people from moving here.

“Housing affordability is a huge challenge right now. Part of this comes from growth, as employers tell us they have good candidates for vacancies who choose to turn down a job offer due to the challenge of affordability and housing availability.

She said the tourism sector remains a big influencer of the dynamics of the regional economy, as do opportunities in technology, agriculture, manufacturing, retail and services, and l aerospace industry.

“Our region’s economic fundamentals remain strong and entrepreneurship and resilience are still strong despite fires, floods and the pandemic.”

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The region will promote Attica wines in the United States, Canada and Japan https://scbwicanada.org/the-region-will-promote-attica-wines-in-the-united-states-canada-and-japan/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 01:50:34 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-region-will-promote-attica-wines-in-the-united-states-canada-and-japan/ The Attica region announced this week that it would take steps to promote wines produced in the region abroad, including in the United States, Canada and Japan. A total of 20 wineries from Attica, members of the Union of Wine Producers of Attica, will participate with their wines holding a Geographical Indication (GI). The wines […]]]>

The Attica region announced this week that it would take steps to promote wines produced in the region abroad, including in the United States, Canada and Japan.

A total of 20 wineries from Attica, members of the Union of Wine Producers of Attica, will participate with their wines holding a Geographical Indication (GI).

The wines will be promoted in the US, Canada, UK, Japan and Korea markets through a special EU-funded program running through August 2023.

The program aims to present the wine production of Attica and includes masterclasses with eminent masters of wine, seminars, visits to vineyards, tastings, familiarization and public relations trips, participation in wine events international markets, marketing and advertising actions as well as the design and publication of relevant documents. Teaching materials.

“Attica’s vineyards and their unique varieties are known for the excellent wines they produce. With European resources and the participation of eminent experts, these wines will be promoted in targeted markets abroad with the aim of raising awareness of the wines of Attica and helping them to gain recognition and sales,” said said the governor of the Attica region. George Patoulis.

“I am convinced that the vineyards of Attica, rich in a 2,500-year-old history, can look to the future with optimism,” he added.

Last year, the Attica Region and the Attica Wine & Food Experience Product Club agreed to promote the region as a wine, food and cultural tourism destination through a series of joint actions.


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Vision appoints Renata Grant Regional Director, Ontario https://scbwicanada.org/vision-appoints-renata-grant-regional-director-ontario/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 14:55:30 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/vision-appoints-renata-grant-regional-director-ontario/ Julie Skinner, Vice President, Leisure Sales and Operations at Vision Travel, announced the appointment of Renata Grant as Regional Director/Ontario. Based at Vision’s head office in Toronto and joining Vision’s team of seven regional managers across the network, Grant will be responsible for growing leisure sales and supporting advisors based at head office as well […]]]>

Julie Skinner, Vice President, Leisure Sales and Operations at Vision Travel, announced the appointment of Renata Grant as Regional Director/Ontario.

Based at Vision’s head office in Toronto and joining Vision’s team of seven regional managers across the network, Grant will be responsible for growing leisure sales and supporting advisors based at head office as well as in Ottawa and Georgetown.

THE ADVERTISEMENT

Grant brings with her more than 20 years in the industry, including as owner of award-winning cruise-focused franchises and as Director/Canada for a large retail travel organization. Her speaking skills led her to act as a guest speaker on a cruise ship.

“We are thrilled to have Renata join the team,” said Skinner, who is responsible for Vision’s leisure sales from British Columbia to Ontario. “Her talents and enthusiasm know no bounds and we know she will be a tremendous asset to us.”

“We have seen a lot of movement in the industry recently and Vision has already welcomed dozens of Independent Travel Consultants in 2022. We are very much looking forward to welcoming many more talented and experienced people to our team in the remainder of 2022 and in 2023 – and we know Renata will play an important role there,” she added.

Grant can be contacted at Renata.grant@visiontravel.ca

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