Canada west – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 02:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png Canada west – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 Canada loses 1-0 to United States in Gold Cup https://scbwicanada.org/canada-loses-1-0-to-united-states-in-gold-cup/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:37:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/canada-loses-1-0-to-united-states-in-gold-cup/ KANSAS CITY – USA coach Gregg Berhalter summed up his team’s game as an incredible start followed by “a lot of suffering. KANSAS CITY – US coach Gregg Berhalter summed up his team’s game as an incredible start followed by “a lot of pain”. But the pain was that of Canada when the final whistle […]]]>

KANSAS CITY – USA coach Gregg Berhalter summed up his team’s game as an incredible start followed by “a lot of suffering.

KANSAS CITY – US coach Gregg Berhalter summed up his team’s game as an incredible start followed by “a lot of pain”.

But the pain was that of Canada when the final whistle sounded on Sunday, beaten 1-0 by its North American rival after conceding a 20-second goal in its final game of the Gold Cup preliminary round.

The Canadian men found their way back into the game after Shaq Moore’s opening goal, but failed to break through the USA defense despite having the advantage in play as the game progressed. Canada led the Americans 14-6 (3-1 on shots on target) and had 54.5 percent possession.

“We asked them a lot of questions,” said Canada coach John Herdman.

“Although I am pissed off by the result today, you will come in and be happy enough with some elements of this performance that we can prepare for the quarter-finals,” he added.

With both teams already qualified for the knockout stages, the sold-out match, the scorching Children’s Mercy Park decided on the top spot in Group B. The North American rivals entered the match with the same goal difference, but Canada, 70th, had scored one more goal. , meaning the 20th-ranked Americans needed to win to finish first while the Canadians only needed a draw.

As the winner of Group B, the United States will face second in Group C in the quarter-finals next weekend. That means taking on No.45 Jamaica or No.50 Costa Rica, who meet on Tuesday to decide the squad.

Canada will face the winner of Group C next Sunday at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, TX. And he finds himself in the bottom half of the table, which could feature Mexico No.11 if he wins Group A. But the Mexicans do this, thanks to a scoreless draw with No.103 Trinidad and -Tobago, must have beaten No.3. 69 El Salvador later Sunday.

Canada entered the game 8-0-0 in 2021, mostly outscoring lesser opponents 39-3, with their last loss coming in January 2020, a 1-0 loss to Iceland. But the United States represented a significant increase in the degree of difficulty.

It was a dream start for Americans.

Canada failed to win multiple duels in their own camp and Sebastian Lletget, given plenty of room on the left flank, sent a low cross that eluded goaltender Max Crepeau and prepared Moore for a tap- in at the far post. It was his first goal in his eight appearances in the United States.

Moore, who plays for Tenerife in Spain, was the only non-MLS starter for the United States

US Soccer said it was the fastest goal in US Men’s National Team history, at least since 1989, when “consistent time records” began to be held.

“The first minute of the game we fell asleep and it’s just something we all have to do better at,” said Canadian midfielder Liam Fraser.

“But for the (last) 75 minutes, we had them on the ropes,” he added. “I think if a few calls come in, things definitely change. But I also think we need to be more clinical in the (penalty) zone and finish the chances that we are creating… Overall I really think we merits come out of there with three points and take the lead of the group. “

Canada unsuccessfully appealed for a ninth-minute penalty when Richie Laryea and Walker Zimmerman got tangled in the penalty area as Laryea tried to get around the USA captain, who lost her balance as both players attempted to repel.

“How’s that not a penalty… not even a free kick,” tweeted injured Canadian star Alphonso Davies.

Mexican referee Adonai Escobedo saw it differently, possibly dismissing it because both players had gripped as they made their way to the penalty area.

Laryea said it was “100%” a penalty.

Despite body language that told a different story at the time, Herdman was a diplomat after the game when asked about the non-penalty, claiming he did not have good eyesight.

“Whenever a defender runs into a striker like that, you always wonder, you always feel like it’s going to go your way,” he added. “I thought it was going to work our way.”

Canadian midfielder Tajon Buchanan, whose star is rising at the tournament, did not mince words.

“Personally, I didn’t think the referee was good today, to be honest,” he said.

Zimmerman was injured on the play and was replaced by Donovan Pines in the 15th minute.

Canada, meanwhile, lost Ayo Akinola in the 24th minute and compatriot Cyle Larin in the 53rd, both to injury.

Akinola, who was making his first start and second appearance for Canada since changing allegiance from the United States, was unable to continue after his knee appeared to twist during a challenge with James Sands . Larin, who had scored five goals in his previous four matches, came out in the 53rd after a loss.

Herdman thought Larin might have a dead leg after absorbing an enemy knee. But he said Akinola’s injury could be more problematic.

“He just felt a little twist in his knee when the player met him,” he said. “Sometimes they look worse than they are. Our fingers crossed there.”

Herdman’s disappointment mostly centered on the fact that his team had a chance of securing a rare victory over the Americans.

The United States has a 16-9-11 advantage in the all-time series, which dates back to a Canadian 1-0 victory in Montreal in June 1925. But Canada has won only once since 1985 .

The only Canadian victory in recent times came in October 2019, a 2-0 triumph for Toronto in the CONCACAF Nations League game. The Americans won the rematch the following month 4-1 in Orlando.

Lletget and Gyasi Zardes were the only two American starters in this Orlando win to feature in Saturday’s starting 11. Steven Vitoria, Samuel Piette and Richie Laryea started in both games for Canada.

Canada is 1-13-9 in games against the United States on American soil, with the only victory in July 1957, a 3-2 victory at St. Louis in a qualifying match for world Cup.

Sunday’s game was a precursor to a meeting in Nashville on September 5 in the final round of World Cup qualifying in the region that spans North and Central America and the Caribbean. Canada will welcome the Americans on January 30 as the so-called octagonal continues.

Both teams have brought young teams to the Gold Cup, with many of their star players with their clubs or injured.

The starting eleven Canadians had 195 caps at the start of the game, with Samuel Piette (55), Larin (39) and Junior Hoilett (33) having 127. The American starters had a combined cap of 160.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 18, 2021

The Canadian Press




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Toronto Blue Jays get government approval to return to Canada on July 30 https://scbwicanada.org/toronto-blue-jays-get-government-approval-to-return-to-canada-on-july-30/ Sat, 17 Jul 2021 00:22:30 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/toronto-blue-jays-get-government-approval-to-return-to-canada-on-july-30/ TORONTO – It has been nearly 22 months since Toronto Blue Jays fans watched Vladimir Guerrero Jr. rip through the blanket with a fastball in the center of the Rogers Center. TORONTO – It has been nearly 22 months since Toronto Blue Jays fans watched Vladimir Guerrero Jr. rip through the blanket with a fastball […]]]>

TORONTO – It has been nearly 22 months since Toronto Blue Jays fans watched Vladimir Guerrero Jr. rip through the blanket with a fastball in the center of the Rogers Center.

TORONTO – It has been nearly 22 months since Toronto Blue Jays fans watched Vladimir Guerrero Jr. rip through the blanket with a fastball in the center of the Rogers Center.

They haven’t seen left-handed ace Hyun-Jin Ryu or great free agent signing George Springer living in a Blue Jays uniform at all.

After nearly two years as baseball nomads, however, the Blue Jays are finally coming home after getting approval to play in Toronto from the federal government on Friday.

The team said in a statement that they will resume playing home games at Rogers Center from July 30 after receiving a so-called national interest exemption.

The exemption, confirmed by the office of the federal Minister of Immigration, will allow players to cross the border without being subject to Canada’s COVID-19 travel restrictions.

“Following careful scrutiny by public health officials at all levels of government, a national interest exemption has been approved that will allow the Toronto Blue Jays to return to Toronto and play home games at the Rogers Center, ”Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino said in a statement. declaration.

“This decision was made in collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada, with the approval of provincial and municipal public health officials.

Mendicino said the plan includes tests before and after the arrival of all people crossing the border, and additional tests four times a week for those who are not vaccinated.

“This also includes important limitations for unvaccinated people, who will have to undergo a modified quarantine, will not be allowed to go anywhere other than the hotel and stadium and will have no interaction with the general public,” he said. -he declares.

Toronto is scheduled to start a three-game home game against the Kansas City Royals on July 30. The Jays haven’t played at Rogers Center since September 29, 2019, an 8-3 win over Tampa Bay.

The team played their home games during the shortened 2020 season in Buffalo, NY, and started that season in Dunedin, Fla., Before returning to Buffalo.

“First and foremost, the Blue Jays would like to thank Canadians for their unprecedented public health efforts and support to the team. Without you, Blue Jays baseball wouldn’t come home this summer, ”the team statement said.

The team added that they will reach 2021 and 2022 season ticket holders in the coming days, and that additional ticket information and health and safety guidelines will be available soon.

“So grateful for the support and hospitality in Dunedin and Buffalo, but after more than 650 days we will finally be coming home to HOME,” Blue Jays president Mark Shapiro said on Twitter. “I can’t tell you how excited we are to play in front of our fans and in our city and our country.

“Get ready Toronto – we’re coming back! “

The return of the Blue Jays is the final step in the return to normalcy of professional sport north of the border.

Ottawa granted the NHL a travel exemption for the final two rounds of the Stanley Cup playoffs and recently approved a plan that allowed CFL players and staff to return to Canada without undergoing a full 14-day quarantine. .

Major League Soccer Toronto FC and CF Montreal teams will host games against opponents from the United States on Saturday. Although a quarantine exemption has not been granted to MLS, fully vaccinated athletes with a work permit can enter the country without completing a 14-day quarantine.

The Blue Jays entered Friday night’s game in Buffalo against the Texas Rangers in third in the American League East standings with a 45-42 record and four and a half games on an American League wild card spot. .

As the team struggles to get out of the middle of the pack, they are arguably one of the most entertaining teams in the league.

Guerrero is having a stellar season and was named the All-Star MVP on Tuesday after his rocket home run helped the AHL to a 5-2 win over the National League.

He forms a solid attacking core with Marcus Semien and Teoscar Hernandez – also stars – as well as Bo Bichette and Cavan Biggio. That could be further increased if Springer, beset in his first season at the Jays with injuries, begins to get back into shape.

Ryu and talented rookie Alek Manoah highlight a decent starting rotation that is often let down by a poor reliever box.

Ryu’s big off-season signings in December 2019 and Springer a year later, and the Blue Jays’ return to the playoffs in 2020 after a three-year absence, were among the recent highlights that Jays fans have had to take in. from afar.

If the Jays have another playoff run this year, they will do it at home.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 16, 2021.

The Canadian Press


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$ 1.9 Million Common Net Bust https://scbwicanada.org/1-9-million-common-net-bust/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 02:27:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/1-9-million-common-net-bust/ GLEN STEWART – A joint operation of several OPP units brought in $ 1.9 million in cannabis plants early Tuesday morning. Officers from the Organized Crime Control Office, the Joint Cannabis Control Team, the Provincial Property Confiscation Unit, the Community Street Crime Unit, the Intervention Team Emergency Department and SD&G Detachment executed a search warrant […]]]>

GLEN STEWART – A joint operation of several OPP units brought in $ 1.9 million in cannabis plants early Tuesday morning.

Officers from the Organized Crime Control Office, the Joint Cannabis Control Team, the Provincial Property Confiscation Unit, the Community Street Crime Unit, the Intervention Team Emergency Department and SD&G Detachment executed a search warrant on July 13 west of Glen Stewart on County Road 18.

More than 1,900 plants were seized, valued at approximately $ 1.9 million.

Two people were arrested at the scene: Longxing Chen, 65, and Xinqiang Chen, 43, both from Georgetown.

The duo have each been charged with cultivating or harvesting illicit cannabis under the Cannabis Act.

Both defendants have been released and are scheduled to appear in Cornwall court on September 9.

Police continue to investigate and ask anyone with information to contact the Ontario Provincial Police at 613-534-2223 or Seaway Valley Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

This is the second major cannabis seizure by police in less than a year in South Dundas. On September 21, 2020, the Ontario Provincial Police arrested 13 people at a cannabis farm at the corner of Rowena and Shaver Roads northwest of Morrisburg. Almost $ 2 million worth of cannabis was seized at that time.


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British Columbia pledges to improve ambulance system after heat wave overwhelms emergency services https://scbwicanada.org/british-columbia-pledges-to-improve-ambulance-system-after-heat-wave-overwhelms-emergency-services/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 01:45:40 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/british-columbia-pledges-to-improve-ambulance-system-after-heat-wave-overwhelms-emergency-services/ Paramedics who worked during the heatwave described a service overwhelmed with hundreds of priority calls. DON MACKINNON / AFP / Getty Images British Columbia has appointed the former Vancouver police chief to oversee an overhaul of how ambulances, paramedics and 911 dispatchers respond to medical emergencies on Canada’s west coast. The move, announced Wednesday afternoon, […]]]>

Paramedics who worked during the heatwave described a service overwhelmed with hundreds of priority calls.

DON MACKINNON / AFP / Getty Images

British Columbia has appointed the former Vancouver police chief to oversee an overhaul of how ambulances, paramedics and 911 dispatchers respond to medical emergencies on Canada’s west coast.

The move, announced Wednesday afternoon, was sparked by an unprecedented heat wave last month that is linked to nearly four times as many sudden deaths that week than in previous years. Patients in and around Vancouver said they waited hours for frontline staff to show up to help.

Jim Chu retired as Vancouver Police Chief in 2015 after more than three decades in the police force and now works for real estate developer Aquilini Investment Group. He accepted the offer on Monday to chair the new board of directors of BC Emergency Health Services, which will report directly to the provincial agency that oversees all specialty health services, as well as to Health Minister Adrian Dix.

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Mr. Chu told a press conference on Wednesday that his first order of business will be to listen to the concerns of a paramedic exasperated by deficiencies in the ambulance system.

British Columbia heat wave highlights growing power of science to discern human influence on extreme weather

He added that his mission in this role would be “to listen to and learn from people who have been on the ground for many more decades than I have”.

The current EHS leadership team remains in place, despite widespread criticism from paramedics and families of the deceased that they were too slow to step up their official response to the heat wave. However, the agency has created the new leadership position of Chief Ambulance Pole who will report directly to Mr. Chu and be responsible for improving the day-to-day operations of the BC Ambulance Service as well as the working conditions of more than 4,500 paramedics. , telephone operators and dispatchers across the province.

The Globe and Mail spoke to four paramedics who worked during the heatwave. All described a service overwhelmed by hundreds of priority calls. Often when they arrived at the scene, someone was already dead.

Paramedics said the changes had an emotional impact and were also physically exhausting: Paramedics wore their uniforms as well as a plastic gown and other personal protective equipment while entering residences as hot as 45 degrees Celsius to revive people. They said they were drenched in sweat and some of their colleagues got sick from the heat.

Usually, several ambulances answer priority calls. But because resources were so dispersed, only one vehicle answered each call. Hospitals were also overwhelmed and often could not accommodate the patients the paramedics were carrying.

Paramedics asked not to be named because they feared repercussions from their employer.

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Troy Clifford, president of the Ambulance Paramedics of BC union, welcomed Wednesday’s announcement, saying he felt cautiously optimistic as the government appeared to have listened to criticism from him and his colleagues, noting that he will meet the new acting paramedic on Thursday.

As the unusually hot summer in British Columbia continues, a measure announced by the province that could quickly improve the service and working conditions of paramedics is the hiring of more mental health professionals, he said. -he declares. Mr Clifford, who has worked as a paramedic for more than 30 years, said up to a quarter of its members are now either seeking mental health treatment after a critical incident at work, are on sick leave work to seek treatment for physical injuries or are in the process of filing a workers compensation claim due to pressures in their workplace.

Making sure more mental health resources are available for paramedics would help them continue working without burnout or give them time to fully recover from any injuries, Mr Clifford said in an interview after the EHS announcement Wednesday.

Some paramedics have said that due to staffing, recruitment, retention, pay and working conditions issues, many paramedic positions are not filled and ambulances are understaffed, even though they are functioning. at full capacity even on a normal day. So when there is a power surge, such as a heat wave, there are not enough paramedics to meet the increased demand.

Mr Dix said his government had increased funding for the service during his four years in office, but acknowledged that more paramedics needed to be hired. British Columbia is also asking the relevant board of directors to consider whether firefighters should be allowed to do more to help respond to medical emergencies, with recommendations due by September 6.

To address the understaffing issue, Dix announced that the province is hiring 85 new full-time paramedics, 30 dispatchers and purchasing 30 new ambulances.

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“It is clear that our paramedics are working very hard,” he said of rescuers’ response to call volumes which have remained above normal since the start of Colombia’s reopening. -British in June, followed by the heat wave that has hit the province in the past. a few weeks.

We have a weekly Western Canada newsletter written by our British Columbia and Alberta office managers, providing a comprehensive set of news you need to know about the region and its place in the issues Canada is facing. confronted with. register today.


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UPDATE – Ashcroft, Cache Creek and Savona are on evacuation alert due to the Tremont Creek wildfire | Radio NL https://scbwicanada.org/update-ashcroft-cache-creek-and-savona-are-on-evacuation-alert-due-to-the-tremont-creek-wildfire-radio-nl/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 01:18:45 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/update-ashcroft-cache-creek-and-savona-are-on-evacuation-alert-due-to-the-tremont-creek-wildfire-radio-nl/ The communities of Ashcroft and Cache Creek as well as neighboring properties in the Thompson-Nicola Regional District have been placed on evacuation alert due to the Tremont Creek wildfire. “We wanted to let you know in advance because we want to emphasize that this is only an alert and that we are doing it with […]]]>

The communities of Ashcroft and Cache Creek as well as neighboring properties in the Thompson-Nicola Regional District have been placed on evacuation alert due to the Tremont Creek wildfire.

“We wanted to let you know in advance because we want to emphasize that this is only an alert and that we are doing it with a lot of caution,” Cache Creek Fire Chief Tom Moe said in a statement.

“Cache Creek is safe from the risk of fire at this time, but please take this opportunity to make sure you are prepared.”

Ashcroft Mayor Barbara Roden echoed a similar sentiment even though the blaze is closer to her community.

“It was very visible in the night sky last night, and people are certainly more aware of it now,” Roden told NL News. “Of course, a lot of people in this region have very bad memories of 2017 and we are trying to get the message across that it is about precaution.”

“As we saw in 2017, misinformation and fear thrive when there is no communication from a trusted source.

675 other TNRD properties are on alert, including the entire community of Savona, Walhachin and Thompson River Estates due to a threat to structures and residents

An evacuation alert for 50 properties near Barnes Lake was also turned into an evacuation order due to the Tremont Creek wildfire.

At the time of the last update, the fire had reached an estimated area of ​​780 hectares. It was discovered on Monday July 12 and is currently out of control.

“Strong winds are expected at the site again this afternoon,” the BC Wildfire Service said in an update at 12:20 pm today. “Heavy equipment is currently working to establish exit lanes and when completed will begin to establish control lines. “

“Additional structural protection teams are on site to carry out further assessments.”

The Ashcroft Indian Band also issued an evacuation alert for RI 2 (One Hundred Mile Post) and RI 4 (Ashcroft).

“We will continue to monitor the Tremont Creek fire and keep our community informed of its condition,” said Chief Greg Blain. “We are in regular communication with EMBC and BC Wildfire. “

“Please don’t panic, we are not in immediate danger. This is just a precaution, and you will be notified as soon as possible of any change in conditions. “

A road alert should also be put in place on the Trans-Canada Highway west of Savona to Cache Creek, then south to the Spences Bridge area. Highway 1 is already closed from the Spences Bridge in Hope due to the ongoing state of emergency in Lytton.

“Local residents are only allowed to George Road via a detour to Highway 5,” a statement from DriveBC said. “Please avoid traveling to this area unless absolutely necessary. “

(Photo via Shianne Elizabeth)


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The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada for Wednesday, July 14, 2021 https://scbwicanada.org/the-latest-news-on-covid-19-developments-in-canada-for-wednesday-july-14-2021/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:56:15 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-latest-news-on-covid-19-developments-in-canada-for-wednesday-july-14-2021/ Latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (every hour Eastern): 6:15 p.m. Alberta reports one death and 46 new COVID-19 infections for a total of 569 active cases. The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (every hour Eastern): 6:15 p.m. Alberta reports one death and 46 new infections from COVID-19 for a total of […]]]>

Latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (every hour Eastern): 6:15 p.m. Alberta reports one death and 46 new COVID-19 infections for a total of 569 active cases.

The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (every hour Eastern):

6:15 p.m.

Alberta reports one death and 46 new infections from COVID-19 for a total of 569 active cases.

The province says 33 of the 113 people hospitalized are receiving intensive care.

The seven-day average of daily cases is 40.

Some 74.3 percent of eligible people aged 12 and older received at least one dose of the vaccine.

The province has announced outdoor prizes, including free fishing and hunting licenses, in an attempt to get more people vaccinated.

5:15 p.m.

Over 50 percent of all eligible adults in British Columbia are now fully immunized.

The health ministry said in a press release that 79.3% of eligible people aged 12 and older received their first injection.

The province is reporting 41 new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths in the past 24 hours.

Hospitalizations have fallen to 65 people, including 11 in intensive care.

3:35 p.m.

Saskatchewan is today reporting 18 new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths.

Thirty more people have recovered, leaving the province with 363 active cases.

The province also reports 54 people hospitalized, including nine in intensive care.

Province-wide, 73% of people aged 12 and over have now received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Fifty-six percent of those 12 and over are fully immunized.

According to provincial statistics, of the 2,000 new cases of COVID-19 reported in June, more than 80% were unvaccinated people.

2:35 p.m.

Yukon is increasing the number of people allowed to assemble under COVID-19 restrictions, with more than three-quarters of residents being fully vaccinated.

Premier Sandy Silver and Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Brendan Hanley said organized gatherings of up to 200 people will be allowed immediately with masks, physical distancing and other public health protocols in place.

Hanley recommends that fully vaccinated people be able to hold personal gatherings of up to 20 people indoors and 50 people outdoors, but the unvaccinated are encouraged to stick with their “safe six” as they run. a significantly higher risk of infection.

Hanley also encouraged daycares to return to full capacity starting Monday, now that cases associated with Whitehorse daycares are under control and most have recovered.

13:35

Manitoba reports 53 new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths.

However, nine earlier cases were deleted due to data correction, for a net increase of 44.

The five-day test positive rate fell to 4% provincially and 3.8% in Winnipeg.

12:30 p.m.

Nova Scotia reports no new cases of COVID-19 and three recoveries.

To date, Nova Scotia has 28 active cases of COVID-19.

Of these, two people are hospitalized in COVID-19 units, including one in intensive care.

As of April 1, there have been 4,128 positive cases of COVID-19 and 26 deaths.

12:15 p.m.

New Brunswick is once again not reporting any new cases of COVID-19.

Health officials have not reported any new infections for nine consecutive days.

There are two active cases of COVID-19 reported in the province and no one is hospitalized for the disease.

Approximately 53.5 of New Brunswickers aged 12 and over are fully immunized and 79.9% of eligible New Brunswickers have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

11:00

Quebec is not reporting any deaths attributed to the new coronavirus for the second day in a row.

Health officials are also today reporting 75 new cases of COVID-19.

Authorities say hospitalizations have dropped from six to 79 and that 25 people were in intensive care, unchanged since Tuesday.

Authorities say 91,241 doses of the vaccine were administered in the past 24 hours.

The province’s public health institute reports that 82.5% of residents over 12 have received at least one dose of the vaccine and 49.7% are considered fully vaccinated.

10:30

Ontario is reporting 153 new cases of COVID-19 in the province and seven more deaths linked to the virus.

Health Minister Christine Elliott said there were 28 new cases in Toronto, 23 in Waterloo region and 20 in Gray Bruce region.

The Ministry of Health says 180 people are in intensive care due to the new coronavirus and 116 are on a ventilator.

Elliott says more than 179,000 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine have been administered since Tuesday’s report for a total of more than 17.4 million doses in the province.

10:25 a.m.

The Government of Nunavut has announced that it will begin testing wastewater for COVID-19 in Iqaluit and Rankin Inlet.

Chief Public Health Officer Dr Michael Patterson says the tests are part of a three-month pilot project.

With Iqaluit stable at zero cases, Patterson also says restrictions may be relaxed even more in the city starting Friday.

The limits for outdoor gatherings will increase to 100 people, while 15 people will be allowed to assemble in a household.

Restaurants, bars and places of worship can also open at 50% of their capacity.

There are no cases of COVID-19 in Nunavut.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 14, 2021.

The Canadian Press


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Unexploded WWII mortar found at Ford Rodd Hill on Vancouver Island https://scbwicanada.org/unexploded-wwii-mortar-found-at-ford-rodd-hill-on-vancouver-island/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:55:13 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/unexploded-wwii-mortar-found-at-ford-rodd-hill-on-vancouver-island/ VICTORIA – A warden at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site in Colwood got more than he expected when he dug up an unexploded mortar. The Parks Canada worker was removing invasive plants from an unused portion of the site when he discovered a shell over 80 years old. The mortar was located partly under […]]]>

VICTORIA – A warden at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site in Colwood got more than he expected when he dug up an unexploded mortar.

The Parks Canada worker was removing invasive plants from an unused portion of the site when he discovered a shell over 80 years old.

The mortar was located partly under the ground of a rocky and heavily forested ravine not open to the public.

“It was only by accident that one of our maintenance workers was there,” Kate Humble of Parks Canada said Wednesday. “This was found in a place the public never goes and is rarely even tampered with by our own team.”

Humble says the staff member immediately called their manager and the area was cordoned off. Parks Canada staff then notified CFB Esquimalt authorities of the find.

“We received a call from the base MP indicating that a two inch mortar was found at Fort Rodd Hill,” said Sebastian Guay, explosive ordnance chief of the Pacific PO Fleet Diving Unit. First Class (RCN).

(Ministry of National Defence)

“The cartridge itself did not have a fuse, but it is not known whether it contained actual explosives or if it was an old training cartridge. He was so old that it was too difficult to identify, ”he said.

Fort Rodd Hill was established in the mid-1890s as a coastal defense stronghold by the Royal Navy. It remained a key part of Canada’s west coast defense network and a military training facility during WWI and WWII.

It was decommissioned as a military installation in 1956 and was turned over to Parks Canada in the early 1960s to make it a national historic site. Prior to the decommissioning of the facility, the site’s terrain was widely swept in search of unused military ammunition.

“It’s extremely unusual to find something like (a mortar) on this site,” Humble said. “A thorough scan of this site has been carried out on several occasions to ensure unexploded ordnance is not found here.”

Humble says the 1930s shell was extremely degraded and there was no identifiable mark on it.

“It was difficult for us to read the marks on it. However, the mortars have a very distinctive shape so that we can identify it visually, ”she said.

“It’s been there for a long time, I can only assume, and there has never been a danger to the public at any time.”

mortar

(Ministry of National Defence)

Guay says it’s possible the mortar shell was used for training in the years leading up to World War II.

“Back then, they used to carry the stuff live with them, without a fuse, when they were training,” Gauy said. “They could always shoot them without the fuse and sometimes they just forgot to put the fuse in.”

Guay says the team of two Navy Ordinance Disposal Experts are highly trained professionals with many years of experience. Once the team determined that the unexploded mortar could be moved safely, it was secured.

“It was placed in a ‘protective bag’ that can support the explosion in case it goes off,” Guay said. “They took him to a bomb disposal zone and detonated him as soon as they got there.”

Guay says members of the Fleet Diving Unit Pacific’s Order Disposal Unit respond to nearly 150 calls for unexploded military orders per year. He says most calls for the expertise of the unit based at CFB Esquimalt come from the Vancouver area.

Guay says if people find an object that looks like a bomb, it’s probably a bomb.

“Don’t touch it and don’t move it,” he said. “If possible, take a picture of it, step back and call the RCMP. The RCMP will call the regional joint operations center that is here on the base and they will let us know that we have a call to answer.


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The numbers explain how and why West cooks, burns and dries https://scbwicanada.org/the-numbers-explain-how-and-why-west-cooks-burns-and-dries/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 20:38:05 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-numbers-explain-how-and-why-west-cooks-burns-and-dries/ In this file photo from June 13, 2021, people hold hands as they gather on the shore of the Great Salt Lake to watch the sunset near Salt Lake City. The lake has been shrinking for years, and a drought in the American West could make this the worst year yet. (Rick Bowmer, Associated Press) […]]]>

In this file photo from June 13, 2021, people hold hands as they gather on the shore of the Great Salt Lake to watch the sunset near Salt Lake City. The lake has been shrinking for years, and a drought in the American West could make this the worst year yet. (Rick Bowmer, Associated Press)

WASHINGTON – The American West bakes, burns and dries in intertwined extreme weather conditions. Four sets of numbers explain how bad it is now, while several more explain why it has become so bad.

The West is going through “the winning trifecta of an epic year of drought followed by unbelievable heat over the past two months and now we have fires,” said John Abatzoglou, University climate and fire specialist of California Merced. “It’s a story of cascading impacts.”

And that of climate change, the data show.

Heat record

In the past 30 days, the country has set 585 all-time heat records, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Of these, 349 are the daily high temperatures and 236 are the hottest temperatures during the night, essential for people to recover from deadly heat waves.

And that doesn’t include Death Valley hitting 130 degrees (54 degrees Celsius) beforehand. If confirmed, it would be the hottest temperature on Earth in decades – and several meteorologists say it would be the hottest reliable temperature on record because many don’t trust the accuracy of two hotter records.

Another part of Death Valley likely set the world record on July 11 for the hottest 24-hour period by averaging the daily high and the overnight low to reach 118.1 (47.9 degrees Celsius), according to meteorologist Maximiliano Herrera, who tracks extreme weather conditions. .

The average daily maximum temperature for the entire region from the Rockies and westward in June was 85.7 degrees (29.8 degrees Celsius), which broke the old record of 1.3 degrees (0.7 degrees Celsius), according to NOAA.

Severe drought

According to the University of Nebraska Drought Monitor, nearly 60% of the western United States is considered exceptional or extreme drought, the two highest categories. This is the highest percentage in the 20 years that the Drought Monitor has tracked. Less than 1% of the West is not drought or considered unusually dry, a record as well.

Low soil moisture

The amount of moisture in the soil is essential, as normally part of the sun’s energy is used to evaporate moisture from the soil and plants. Additionally, when the soil and plants are dry, areas burn much more often and hotter in wildfires and the available water supply decreases for places like California, a “real indicator of how dry things are. “said Abatzoglou.

NOAA and NASA show soil moisture levels are among the lowest on record for much of the West. Most areas of California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, and Idaho are drier than 99% in other years.

Forest fires are burning

According to the National Interagency Fire Center, 68 large active fires are burning, consuming 1,038,003 acres of land. With these fires and those in Canada, there is “a large area of ​​smoke over much of the United States and Canada,” NOAA said Tuesday.

So far this year, wildfires have burned 2.2 million acres, which is below the 10-year average for this time of year. But that may change as dry plants are at a very high risk of burning in much of the West, as shown by what experts call the energy-releasing component of fire.

Summers are getting hotter

“The history of the heatwave cannot be seen as an isolated extreme event, but rather as part of a longer history of climate change with more related, wider and more varied impacts,” said climate scientist Jennifer Francis of the Woodwell Climate Research Center in Cape Cod.

From 1991 to 2020, summers in the Rockies and westward on average became 2.7 degrees (1.5 Celsius) warmer. The West is warming faster than the rest of the United States and the globe.

More heat domes from a weaker jet stream

The weather phenomenon now roasting the West that brought temperatures of 116 degrees (46.7 Celsius) to Portland, Oregon at the end of June is often referred to as a thermal dome – where the high pressure parks. over an area and hot air flows. This usually happens when the jet stream – the river of air that brings weather to certain places – gets stuck and doesn’t push storms forward.

Pennsylvania State University climatologist Michael Mann found that the number of jet stream stalls in the northern hemisphere increased from about six times per summer in the early 1980s to about eight times per summer. now.

“We have shown that climate change is making these summer-stuck jets more frequent,” Mann said.

Less rain

The West received an average of 13.6 inches (34.5 centimeters) of snow and rain from July 2020 to June 2021. Over the past 10 years, the region has received on average just over 19 inches (48 centimeters) of precipitation per year amid what scientists call a mega-drought. In the 1980s and 1990s, before the onset of the mega-drought, the West received on average nearly 22 inches (56 centimeters) of rain.

A 2020 study said that “global warming has pushed what would have been a moderate drought in southwestern North America into mega-drought territory.”

No more forest fires

From 2011 to 2020, an average of 7.5 million acres (3 million hectares) burned in forest fires each year. That’s more than double the average of 3.6 million acres (1.4 million hectares) per year from 1991 to 2000, according to data from the National Interagency Fire Center.

It’s not just more acres burned, but more “very, very big fires,” UC Merced’s Abatzoglou said, noting that the combination of drought and heat means plants are more susceptible to burn and fires get bigger.

“The drought we have experienced this year and the warm temperatures have allowed the fire season to unfold harshly and really early on,” he said.

The Associated Press’s Department of Health and Science receives support from the Department of Science Education at Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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Alberta businesses see silver lining as oil prices rise and sun shines on the Stampede https://scbwicanada.org/alberta-businesses-see-silver-lining-as-oil-prices-rise-and-sun-shines-on-the-stampede/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 20:36:31 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/alberta-businesses-see-silver-lining-as-oil-prices-rise-and-sun-shines-on-the-stampede/ As the lights went out and the music started blasting at Calgary’s Home and Away sports bar last weekend, owner James Martin felt something he hadn’t felt for a long time: the hope. The bar was maybe 60 to 70 percent full, nothing to do with the pre-pandemic days when a big game or corporate […]]]>

As the lights went out and the music started blasting at Calgary’s Home and Away sports bar last weekend, owner James Martin felt something he hadn’t felt for a long time: the hope.

The bar was maybe 60 to 70 percent full, nothing to do with the pre-pandemic days when a big game or corporate Christmas party would result in a full house. But since Alberta lifted all COVID-19 restrictions on July 1, Martin has seen a slow but steady increase in the number of customers.

The July 9 kickoff of the 10-day Calgary Stampede, just a five-minute walk away, provided an extra boost as patrons wearing cowboy boots search for a drink.

“We had a dance floor of people singing songs on Saturday night and it was awesome,” Martin said. “It just made me feel super positive.”

Martin isn’t the only business owner in Alberta to feel a glimmer of light these days, at the end of what has been a long tunnel. Like everywhere else in Canada, Alberta’s business community has spent the past 16 months grappling with COVID-19-related public health restrictions and mandatory shutdown orders.

But in Alberta, the effects of the pandemic were magnified by the collapse in oil prices last year.

Beyond the pandemic

The province’s economy shrank 8.2% in 2020, according to Statistics Canada, making it the hardest-hit province in the country. The recovery has been slow – while the Canadian unemployment rate fell from 8.2% to 7.8% in June, Alberta’s unemployment rate fell from 8.7% to 9.3%.

The province is still short of about 50,000 jobs from where it was at the start of the pandemic.

“It’s been tough for a little while now, and obviously the last year and a half has been even tougher,” said Ben Gerwing, president of the Alberta Boot Company, an iconic Calgary store that specializes in made western boots. in hand and fitted politicians, celebrities. and even royalty.

Gerwing said business has been tough for seven years, since the 2015 oil crash plunged the province into two years of recession. It was easier to sell premium cowboy boots in 2014, when oil was over US $ 100 a barrel and exuberant corporate Stampede parties were the norm.

“If you’re in Calgary, or Alberta for that matter, even if you’re not in the oil and gas industry, you are in the oil and gas industry,” he said.

This is where Gerwing, like Martin, sees signs of hope.

Rising oil prices

It’s not just the rollout of vaccinations and the lifting of public health restrictions that companies are celebrating, or the fact that a mildly moderate version of the Stampede took place this year.

The event, which generated $ 227 million in Calgary in 2019 according to a report by the Conference Board of Canada, was canceled due to COVID-19 in 2020 but is taking place this year with some modifications and about half of attendance. normal.

What companies are also watching is the price of oil, which has taken off as economies around the world reopen and travel begins to pick up.

On Tuesday, the benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude price closed at US $ 75.25 per barrel, down from $ 30 in April 2020 and approaching a high not seen since 2014.

Roger Tang, managing director of Deltastream Energy Corp., a private Calgary-based oil and gas exploration company, said the mood in the oil industry was still cautious, but many companies were starting to ramp up production.

“A lot of people are starting to talk about drilling more wells,” Tang said. “If that happens, well service companies will also benefit – from being in a depressed market for the past seven years and having to lay people off, now looking to hire them back.”

GDP and jobs

A report released earlier this month by CIBC Capital Markets predicted that Alberta will lead the country in economic growth this year, with real GDP growth forecast of 7.9%. That same report predicted the province’s unemployment rate to be 8.5% in 2021, still high from 6.9% in 2019.

Alberta’s energy sector will take time to recover from seven years of cost reductions, and long-term expansion of the sector remains constrained by a continuing shortage of pipeline capacity. It will also take time for small businesses to recover from the devastating impact of COVID-19, but Tang said he believes many of Calgary are feeling sunnier than they have been in some time.

“I think all of these factors coincide,” he said. “Better industry, better economic outlook, Stampede week – which is Calgary’s highlight every year and last year we didn’t have – I think all of these things certainly make a lot of people happy.

At Calaway Park, a family-friendly amusement park on the outskirts of town, morale is high, said general manager Bob Williams.

International visitors are yet to return and the on-site campground is only 60 to 80 percent full, but Williams said visitor spending on everything from concessions to games was up from last year, and he’s optimistic about the future.

“I’ve been saluting the release the last few nights and people are happy. We’re seeing a very different mood this year than it was last year,” said Williams.

“It just seems like there’s a bit more jump in their step this year than what we’ve seen.”


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Heat wave in western Canada accelerates glacier melt, experts say https://scbwicanada.org/heat-wave-in-western-canada-accelerates-glacier-melt-experts-say/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 20:09:14 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/heat-wave-in-western-canada-accelerates-glacier-melt-experts-say/ VANCOUVER – A scorching heat wave in the last week of June in western Canada has left little mark, including fragile glaciers that are already melting at an accelerated rate, experts say. VANCOUVER – A scorching heat wave in the last week of June in western Canada has left little mark, including fragile glaciers that […]]]>

VANCOUVER – A scorching heat wave in the last week of June in western Canada has left little mark, including fragile glaciers that are already melting at an accelerated rate, experts say.

VANCOUVER – A scorching heat wave in the last week of June in western Canada has left little mark, including fragile glaciers that are already melting at an accelerated rate, experts say.

Dozens of temperature records were shattered during the period, including a Canadian record of 49.6 ° C in Lytton, British Columbia, the day before a fire destroyed most of the community.

Brian Menounos, Canada Research Chair in Glacial Change at the University of Northern British Columbia, said that even at elevations of 3,000 meters it was about six degrees above the average.

“Hotter than anything we’ve seen so it was clearly a warm, warm enough event.”

He and other scientists are working to quantify the melting of glaciers caused by the heat wave, Menounos said.

Most of the glaciers in the mountains of Alberta and British Columbia “were not in good condition” and are expected to disappear by the turn of the century due to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change caused. by human activity, he said.

Jeffrey Kavanaugh, associate professor in the Faculty of Science at the University of Alberta, estimated that the ice melt during the so-called June thermal dome on the Wapta Icefield was three times greater than normal during of the past twelve years. The Wapta Icefield is the source of the Glacier and the Bow River.

He looked at the data from June 25 to July 4 and compared it to temperatures for the same interval over the previous 12 years.

The temperature only dropped below zero once during this period; all other nights it stayed as high as 7.5 C.

“Because the increase in melt during the thermal dome event melted the snowpack in many places and exposed the glacier ice, it changed the rate of melt for the remainder of the summer,” Kavanaugh said.

“So the melt will be increased compared to a normal summer. Even though temperatures are normal, we will see even more melt the rest of the summer than we would otherwise have. This is an impact that will continue through the summer. less until the snow falls and covers the glaciers again. ”

Menounos said the heat coincides with the summer solstice, when the northern hemisphere receives “maximum energy” from the sun.

“It was really kind of a one-two punch.”

Smoke from the hundreds of fires burning across the province is an additional issue, with soot increasing melting and a blanket of smoke that reduces sunlight but also traps heat to increase glacier thaw, a- he declared.

“It’s a complicated research topic that a lot of people are starting to study and trying to understand better,” Menounos added.

This rate of glacier melt is typically seen in late July and August, he said.

Glaciers will experience a “longer melt season” if temperatures stay above normal, he noted.

“Glaciologists worry every time you get conditions that are going to keep melting for, you know, substantial amounts of time.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 14, 2021.

Hina Alam, The Canadian Press


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