Canada west – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 10:47:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png Canada west – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 Canadian Ski Resorts Face Labor Shortage, Government Delays In Issuing Work Visas | national https://scbwicanada.org/canadian-ski-resorts-face-labor-shortage-government-delays-in-issuing-work-visas-national/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/canadian-ski-resorts-face-labor-shortage-government-delays-in-issuing-work-visas-national/ VANCOUVER – Canadian ski resorts that rely heavily on international workers are bracing for a labor shortage this winter as the federal visa approval process slows down. With the reopening of international borders to vaccinated travelers and vaccine passports allowing for increased accommodation capacity, Paul Pinchbeck, CEO of Ski Canada, said the anticipated busy ski […]]]>

VANCOUVER – Canadian ski resorts that rely heavily on international workers are bracing for a labor shortage this winter as the federal visa approval process slows down.

With the reopening of international borders to vaccinated travelers and vaccine passports allowing for increased accommodation capacity, Paul Pinchbeck, CEO of Ski Canada, said the anticipated busy ski season “creates a conundrum” for resorts across. the country.

“We have significant demand for our products, as evidenced by early season travel bookings and season pass sales, but we are short of several thousand employees across the country and this will hamper our ability. to provide their services this year, ”he said. “The magnitude of this cannot be understated.”

Michael Ballingall, senior vice president of Big White Ski Resort in Kelowna, B.C., said about 60% of his staff were international workers with two International Experience Canada visas. years before the pandemic.

He said the resort normally has an influx of applications for seasonal workers in the fall, but the pandemic is making it difficult for people to get work visas. The resort is currently at 45% of its staffing capacity and Ballingall has said secondary services, like hospitality, will suffer if nothing changes.

Irish visa applicant Lili Minah has already been offered a bartender position at one of Mooney Supply Group’s three restaurants in the village of Big White and hopes to receive a response from Immigration Canada before her flight to Colombia. British on November 20.

“If they don’t send me an invitation to apply for a visa by then, I guess it will only be a vacation,” she said.

Ana Mooney, who offered Minah the maid job, said 60% of their staff usually have visas. She said her restaurants were running out of around 50 employees ahead of the season, and three staff members had already chosen to return home because the visa process had taken too long.

“Tourism is hit so hard by COVID and having a second year of it means some people won’t weather the storm,” she said. “It’s not just in the ski industry, it’s tourism in general. As the borders open up, there are more visitors, but we don’t have the manpower. ‘work to take care of them. “

Ballingall said only a small number of visas are being processed, while permits for people allowed to work last year expire, leaving workers and resorts in limbo.

“When the pandemic hit, a lot of (international workers) still had their visas, so they could work for us last year,” he said. “This year most of those people are still in the country but their visas have expired, so we are pushing the government to reactivate the visas because everyone in this industry is in the same boat.”

Gemma Nicolle, 30, worked two winters in retail at Big White and is hoping her work visa will be reinstated in time for ski season.

“I’m going to have to start working again very soon to be able to stay here, so towards the end of November if nothing improves I will probably have to go home,” she said.

Ballingall said the Western Canada Ski Resorts Association and the Canadian Ski Council have joined with Big White in hiring a lobbying firm to convince the government to reinstate expired visas.

“We need more people and we ask the government to help us revive our businesses but also to provide a boost for Canadian tourism in general,” said Pinchbeck.

“Last year we didn’t have this crying need as we were heading into the different waves of COVID and we expected to reduce operations. This year we have proven that this is an industry that can operate in a safe and responsible manner. way and because governments know so much more about this virus and its transmission now, we are confident that we will need these people to scale up services. “

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada said in an email that continued restrictions on international and border travel, limited operational capacity overseas, and clients’ inability to obtain documents due to the pandemic have created barriers in processing, which he says hampers his ability to finalize requests, creating delays beyond his control.

“Since the onset of the pandemic, IRCC has prioritized applications from workers in critical positions in agriculture and health care, where the workforce is most needed to protect the health of Canadians and ensure a supply sufficient food, ”the ministry said.

Although he said he was focusing his resources on the resettlement of Afghan refugees through existing programs, there was no disruption in dealing with other business lines, including International Experience Canada, the ministry said.

“Despite these efforts, we know that some applicants have experienced considerable wait times with the processing of their applications. We continue to work as hard as possible to reduce overall processing times.

Ballingall said the Big White administration is not panicking yet. He said he hoped to attract Canadian workers this winter after the end of the Canada Emergency Benefit.

“We will start to panic around November 1 if nothing changes, because there are simply not enough Canadians in the basin right now to satisfy the industry. Something must give way. “

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on October 23, 2021.

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This story was produced with the financial assistance of Facebook and the Canadian Press News Fellowship.


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COP26: Will there be real action on climate change, or just more “blah, blah, blah”? https://scbwicanada.org/cop26-will-there-be-real-action-on-climate-change-or-just-more-blah-blah-blah/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 22:02:47 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/cop26-will-there-be-real-action-on-climate-change-or-just-more-blah-blah-blah/ “Rebuild better. Blah, blah, blah. Green economy. Blah, blah, blah. Net zero by 2050. Blah, blah, blah. Climate neutral. Blah, blah, blah. It’s been a month since eco-warrior Greta Thunberg once again stormed the climate action scene and once again demonstrated the devastating power of her outspoken speech. The platform was the Youth4Climate conference in […]]]>

“Rebuild better. Blah, blah, blah.

Green economy. Blah, blah, blah.

Net zero by 2050. Blah, blah, blah.

Climate neutral. Blah, blah, blah.

It’s been a month since eco-warrior Greta Thunberg once again stormed the climate action scene and once again demonstrated the devastating power of her outspoken speech. The platform was the Youth4Climate conference in Milan, but the target was undoubtedly the next global climate conference, COP26, which will start on October 31 in Glasgow.

“That’s all we hear from our so-called leaders: words,” Thunberg continued. “We’ve had 30 years of their blah, blah, blah.”

This is the cleverly placed sound clip against which the two-week high will be measured: more words drifting far into the future? Or clear, measurable and short-term actions?

Long-term promises have been the hallmark of the annual gathering, postponed last year due to the pandemic. The time for such a blast of smoke has elapsed. As John Kerry, the United States’ special envoy on climate change, said this week, Glasgow is the “last best hope” to act now to avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis. “We have to hit the road here and we’ve been talking about it for 30 years,” he told BBC News.

Tragically, it’s never been easier to detail real-life examples of a world on the brink. As sandstorms silt into cropland in Madagascar, the United Nations warns the country is on the brink of the world’s first climate change-related famine, with its starving population doing nothing to contribute to the climate catastrophe.

The heat wave trapping heat dome that swept across Canada’s west coast and the Pacific Northwest in July pushed temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius and killed hundreds.

Our oceans are hotter than ever in history.

Scientists at the University of British Columbia have documented the monumental deaths of marine animals along the coastline of the Salish Sea.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, global warming will cause sea level to rise by one meter by the end of the century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced, and quickly. A bold headline in a recent panel report helps: “Human influence has warmed the climate at an unprecedented rate for 2,000 years.” “

The European Commission predicts nearly 100,000 deaths per year in Europe due to extreme heat if global warming increases by three degrees Celsius by the end of the century. What is currently considered a 50-year heat wave in Spain could happen every year, and deadly, in this scenario.

And so on. We hardly know where to stop.

When the United Nations launched its first Conference of the Parties, or COP, all these years ago, the scientific evidence was much less clear.

In 2015, 191 countries, plus the European Union, gathered at COP21 to sign a legally binding international treaty committing to more ambitious climate action to reduce emissions and adapt to climate impacts. The Paris Agreement has been hailed for setting long-term goals to limit the increase in global temperature to well below two degrees while continuing “efforts” to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees. The commitments – such a sweet word – had to be reviewed every five years.

Yet greenhouse gas emissions are increasing and the world remains on track to three degrees of global warming. Just this week, the United Nations revealed that governments, despite their lofty “ambitions”, still plan to produce more than double the amount of fossil fuels in 2030 compared to the 1.5 degree target.

No wonder Greta Thunberg is fed up with rhetoric.

On Wednesday, she tweeted a link to this UN report. “It may no longer be possible for politicians to get away with ignoring the gap between their words and their actions,” she wrote. It is indisputable. The challenge of COP26 will be to convincingly demonstrate that swift action will finally be taken.

Saturday: COP26 – Politics, the players and the obstacles to success.


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Ottawa’s proposal to transition oil and gas workers to new jobs is insufficient, think tank says https://scbwicanada.org/ottawas-proposal-to-transition-oil-and-gas-workers-to-new-jobs-is-insufficient-think-tank-says/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 22:06:31 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/ottawas-proposal-to-transition-oil-and-gas-workers-to-new-jobs-is-insufficient-think-tank-says/ Federal government proposals to support oil and gas workers as Canada moves away from fossil fuel production fall short of some of the big challenges of this industrial shift, according to the Canada West Foundation. The independent, non-partisan think tank says there are two key pillars missing from Ottawa’s “just transition” strategy. It also states […]]]>

Federal government proposals to support oil and gas workers as Canada moves away from fossil fuel production fall short of some of the big challenges of this industrial shift, according to the Canada West Foundation.

The independent, non-partisan think tank says there are two key pillars missing from Ottawa’s “just transition” strategy.

It also states that the categories described are “insufficient and do not capture all the critical elements that must inform a just transition”.

The federal government launched a discussion paper and a three-month consultation period on its proposed oil and gas worker transition policy in July.

The policy aims to support workers and move them to new jobs as the country slowly shifts away from carbon-intensive sectors – in July.

This legislation is under development.

The Ottawa paper examines four elements:

  • Engage people and stakeholders on the way forward.
  • Create stages in line with regional needs.
  • Be inclusive of diversity in changes.
  • Ensure international cooperation.

The government is also considering establishing an advisory body to advise on transition strategies.

“It was like saying how are we going to build a house and say, ‘Well, we’re going to have a nice garden and make sure we have well-insulated windows and a big mirror in the bathroom.’

“All of these things are fantastic, but there are some fundamentals missing that you also need to build really solid things,” said Marla Orenstein, director of the foundation’s natural resources center.

The foundation calls on Ottawa to change its plan to make regional supports proportional to job losses in these places, and to focus its support on workers, not to mention the fallout on communities that will lose sources of income and businesses that could go bankrupt.

“It won’t be helpful for someone who loses their job in a rural prairie community if that other job pops up, but it’s in tech in downtown Montreal,” she said.

CBC News has contacted the Ministry of Natural Resources, which spearheads the legislation, for comment.

Lessons from the Rust Belt, Newfoundland and the UK

Orenstein says examples like the collapse of communities in the Rust Belt in the United States as manufacturing declined, in Newfoundland after the cod moratorium and in the United Kingdom after the phasing out of gold mining. coal are cautions for Canada.

“What we are seeing is a deepening of communities, degradation of infrastructure, the value of property and homes of people disappearing and things turning into ghost towns. It is not pretty. And it is. is something that I think everyone really wants to avoid. “

The federal discussion paper says that “the Government of Canada also recognizes that the transition will have varying impacts across the country, between regions, sectors and demographics.”

A report of TD Economics estimates that up to 450,000 workers are at risk of being displaced by 2050. According to this research, approximately 600,000 Canadians are employed in the oil and gas industry.

The Liberal Trudeau government has pledged $ 2 billion to retrain oil and gas workers. In the election, the party also pledged to phase out oil and gas subsidies by 2023, two years ahead of the original plan.

Ottawa aims to bring Canada to net zero emissions by 2050, with other carbon reduction milestones along the way, such as a 40-45% reduction from 2005 levels by 2030.

The federal government continues to consult with provinces, stakeholders and the public on the legislation. The comments will be compiled into a report which will be made public.


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The biggest trees in Canada? Look in British Columbia https://scbwicanada.org/the-biggest-trees-in-canada-look-in-british-columbia/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 16:38:39 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-biggest-trees-in-canada-look-in-british-columbia/ Content of the article The larger trees in Ontario are pale compared to the larger trees on the west coast of Canada. Content of the article This does not mean that Ontario has small trees. Bragging rights for Ontario’s tallest, reaching 47 meters, go to a white pine in the town of Arnprior, just west […]]]>

Content of the article

The larger trees in Ontario are pale compared to the larger trees on the west coast of Canada.

Content of the article

This does not mean that Ontario has small trees. Bragging rights for Ontario’s tallest, reaching 47 meters, go to a white pine in the town of Arnprior, just west of Ottawa.

Closer to home in Arkona, a willow weighs 7.32 meters in circumference or diameter, slightly thinner than a larger Nova Scotia willow.

In North York, a northern red oak believed to be around 300 years old is rooted at the center of a dispute with the city. In 2018, the owners agreed to sell the house and the land it sits on to the city so that everyone can enjoy the important tree. But the deal was not reached due to slow fundraising efforts. The owner now wants to renegotiate. This is understandable.

To see the tallest trees in Canada, you have to drive to Vancouver Island. The most visited tall trees are in Cathedral Grove, about an hour’s drive west of Nanaimo. A popular rest stop, Cathedral Grove has ample parking, short, well-traveled walking trails, and is wheelchair friendly. Trees, especially Douglas-fir, are estimated to be 800 years old.

Closer to vacation hotspots of Tofino and Ucluelet, the Ancient Cedar Loop and Giant Cedar Trail are home to western red cedars, eastern hemlock, Douglas-fir and Sitka spruce. Many have birth certificates nearly 1,000 years old, four meters or more in circumference, and nearly 100 meters high.

It’s no wonder Vancouver Island is home to the tallest trees in Canada. Cooler summers, warmer winters, and abundant and reliable rainfall create perfect growing conditions.

Content of the article

The challenge facing Canada’s tallest trees is the wind. Tree lovers don’t need to remember the December 2006 windstorm that razed 14 hectares of forest in Vancouver’s precious Stanley Park. Where the wind didn’t knock the trees down, it cut many more in half.

Where size doesn’t matter, also on the west coast, near Ucluelet, are some of the smallest trees in Canada. The short, stroller-friendly Shorepine Bog Trail, part of Pacific Rim National Park, has swampy, spongy soil with unusually low pH or acidity levels. The trail is a boardwalk that floats above the bog, designed to protect the ecosystem below. The shore pines here, one of the few trees that can tolerate acidity, may be hundreds of years old, but only a few feet tall.


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Mowi ASA (OSE: MOWI): Q3 2021 Trade Update https://scbwicanada.org/mowi-asa-ose-mowi-q3-2021-trade-update/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/mowi-asa-ose-mowi-q3-2021-trade-update/ Mowi ASA (OSE:MOWI): Q3 2021 Trade update Harvest volumes Q3 2021 (1) Agriculture Norway 71.0 thousand tons Agriculture Scotland 15.0 thousand tons Agriculture Chile 15.0 thousand tons Agriculture Canada 11.0 thousand tons Agriculture Ireland 2.0 thousand tons Faroe Agriculture 3.0 thousand tons Total 117.0 thousand tons As part of the presentation of the results of […]]]>

Mowi ASA (OSE:MOWI): Q3 2021 Trade update

Harvest volumes Q3 2021 (1)

Agriculture Norway 71.0 thousand tons
Agriculture Scotland 15.0 thousand tons
Agriculture Chile 15.0 thousand tons
Agriculture Canada 11.0 thousand tons
Agriculture Ireland 2.0 thousand tons
Faroe Agriculture 3.0 thousand tons
Total 117.0 thousand tons

As part of the presentation of the results of the second quarter of 2021, Mowi ASA guided a total harvest volume of 110 thousand tons (GWE) for the third quarter of 2021.

To note:
(1) Harvest volumes are provided in eviscerated weight equivalents (GWE). Figures include salmonid species only.

Additional information

The Group’s operating EBIT amounted to around 131 million euros in the third quarter of 2021 (80 million euros in the third quarter of 2020). Operating EBIT was negatively impacted by 11 million euros related to extraordinary mortalities in Farming Canada, of which 6 million euros were caused by a plankton proliferation incident in Canada West and 5 million euros in connection with an oxygen deficiency incident in Canada East. The cost of mixed farming per kg harvested was 4.59 euros. Extraordinary mortalities in Farming Canada affected the total margin for the quarter by 0.09 EUR / kg.

Total operating EBIT per kg along the value chain was approximately as follows:

Norway EUR 1.40
Scotland EUR 0.90
Chile EUR 0.90
Canada EUR 0.00
Ireland EUR 1.85
Faroe EUR 0.85

Operating EBIT for Consumer Products amounted to € 22 million (€ 21 million in the third quarter of 2020) and Feed to € 10 million in the third quarter of 2021 (€ 12 million in the third quarter of 2020 ).

The published net interest-bearing financial debt (DNI) amounted to approximately € 1,150 million at the end of the quarter (excluding IFRS 16 effects).

The full third quarter 2021 report will be released on November 10 at 6:30 a.m. CET.

Please refer to the Annual Report for detailed descriptions and reconciliations of non-IFRS measures such as operating EBIT and NIBD.

This information is subject to disclosure requirements in accordance with Section 5-12 of the Norwegian Securities Law.


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West Canada Valley excludes Cooperstown from football https://scbwicanada.org/west-canada-valley-excludes-cooperstown-from-football/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 22:31:53 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/west-canada-valley-excludes-cooperstown-from-football/ COOPERSTOWN – The rain held up to halftime at Cooperstown on Saturday and gave the West Valley Indians enough time to secure a rebound victory. The Indians (5-1, 2-1 Eight-Player Southeast) scored five first-quarter touchdowns and 56 first-half points en route to a 64-0 road win a week after suffering their first defeat against the […]]]>

COOPERSTOWN – The rain held up to halftime at Cooperstown on Saturday and gave the West Valley Indians enough time to secure a rebound victory.

The Indians (5-1, 2-1 Eight-Player Southeast) scored five first-quarter touchdowns and 56 first-half points en route to a 64-0 road win a week after suffering their first defeat against the undefeated Morrisville-Eaton Warriors.

The shutout was the first recorded by a West Canada Valley defense in three seasons of competitive eight-player football.

John Michael started the scoring with a 36-yard touchdown run and Iain Farber stopped an interception for a score on Cooperstown’s next possession. Quarterback Brayden Shepardson ran for the first three of his five touchdowns in the first quarter and added the number 4 early in the second before Michael Tubia and Sean Burdick each ran for a touchdown before half-time.


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Lee Valley warns customers of delays of up to 1 year, higher prices to come https://scbwicanada.org/lee-valley-warns-customers-of-delays-of-up-to-1-year-higher-prices-to-come/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 18:05:07 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/lee-valley-warns-customers-of-delays-of-up-to-1-year-higher-prices-to-come/ Canadian retailer Lee Valley Tools has a grim warning for anyone looking to get their hands on some high-end garden shears, brass badges or crokinole planks anytime soon: good luck. The Ottawa home and garden chain with 20 stores across Canada told customers in an email this week that it was sending its Christmas catalog […]]]>

Canadian retailer Lee Valley Tools has a grim warning for anyone looking to get their hands on some high-end garden shears, brass badges or crokinole planks anytime soon: good luck.

The Ottawa home and garden chain with 20 stores across Canada told customers in an email this week that it was sending its Christmas catalog “uncomfortable ahead” this year because it was anticipating significant delays in bringing its products to market.

“The message to consumers is to buy early because there is no chance of ordering or restocking [before Christmas]CEO Robin Lee said in an interview with CBC News. He said the company’s inventory now consists of products it ordered a year ago.

Lee Valley is just the latest company to warn of the massive problems it faces in getting its products from suppliers and manufacturers to shelves – a complicated process known as the supply chain.

The COVID-19 pandemic upset usual trends in supply and demand by eliminating both in early 2020, as factories were closing to keep workers safe, and consumers were not anyway. in the mood to buy something other than the essentials.

But now that things are slowly returning to some sort of normalcy, vendors cannot scale up fast enough to meet the booming demand for everything from cars and home appliances to game consoles and even iPhones.

Shipping costs are a major factor, with the price of shipping containers from Asia to the west coast of North America having more than quadrupled this year, a logistics company recently told CBC News in an interview. .

Container ships wait off Long Beach, Calif., October 1. The cost of shipping containers from Asia to the west coast of North America has more than quadrupled this year, according to logistics companies. (Alan Devall / Reuters)

Labor shortage, fuel costs blamed

Lee Valley CEO says labor shortages and higher fuel costs are driving up prices.

“There is a lot of [shipping] containers there, but the cost of moving them has increased. In some cases, orders of magnitude. We used to pay around $ 7,000 to bring a container from Asia, and the cost today is $ 34,000, ”said Lee.

Lee Valley says consumers shouldn’t expect to receive some items until next Christmas, let alone this one.

Lee pointed to one of his company’s strawberries. Normally this part would take four months to arrive from a company in Taiwan where he has been ordering for years. He placed an order last week and said the expected delivery date is May 2022.

“A lot can happen by then. And if we get just a little more demand, we could be out of stock for over a year on this product.”

He estimates that problems with the supply chain may continue for another 12 to 18 months, but cautions it’s hard to tell.

“Consumers need to understand that even when COVID is over, it is not over,” Lee said. “This ripple effect is going to continue for a very, very long time.”

Ikea is also reporting issues

Small businesses like Lee Valley have been wiped out, but even the big fish are in trouble. Swedish furniture retailer Ikea says it also can’t keep its shelves fully stocked just yet.

Company CEO Jon Abrahamsson said the biggest challenge is getting goods out of China, where about a quarter of Ikea products are made. As a result, he expects consumers to face difficulties until 2022.

Most of the chain’s products in Europe are also made there, but more of what is sold in North America comes from Asia, so the supply crunch is being felt the hardest in Canada. and the United States.

“On the retail side, we’ve learned agility like never before because every day you have to work with what you have,” Abrahamsson said. “You have to find ways to solve customer needs with limits we’ve never seen before. “


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‘There is heightened intensity’: In shortened season, Huskies’ home opener packs extra punch https://scbwicanada.org/there-is-heightened-intensity-in-shortened-season-huskies-home-opener-packs-extra-punch/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 12:11:15 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/there-is-heightened-intensity-in-shortened-season-huskies-home-opener-packs-extra-punch/ Breadcrumb Links U of S Huskies “I’m lucky to be here with my friends, to play football, and that’s the main thing. It’s the approach we take as a team.” Author of the article: Kevin mitchell • Saskatoon StarPhoenix Release date : October 14, 2021 • 27 minutes ago • 3 minutes to read • […]]]>

“I’m lucky to be here with my friends, to play football, and that’s the main thing. It’s the approach we take as a team.”

Content of the article

It took a long time to get home.

Content of the article

University of Saskatchewan Huskies football players think about it as they prepare for Saturday’s 2 p.m. home opener at Griffiths Stadium against the Alberta Golden Bears – the first official game there since November 2, 2019.

“No day is guaranteed,” said Huskies quarterback Mason Nyhus. “We’ve seen it over the past year and a half. I’m lucky to be here with my friends, to play football, and that’s the main thing. This is the approach we take as a team.

The 2020 Canada West football season has been wiped out by COVID-19. The 2021 campaign started later than usual and has been reduced from eight games to six. The Huskies are currently 1-1, with both games played on the road – a 34-20 loss to Calgary, followed by a 43-15 victory over British Columbia.

In this latest contest, Nyhus and the rest of his unit fully unleashed their veteran offense – 626 yards total, including 255 on the ground and 371 in the air.

And now they’re heading to the all-new turf at Griffiths Stadium against the Bears 1-1. The Huskies beat Manitoba in a non-conference game last month, but it is their first game since a 28-23 playoff win over Alberta 23 months ago.

“You can ask most of the elders and all of the guys here – it’s a pretty special experience, running, especially the first time these young guys do it live, coming out of the dog (giant inflatable),” he said. said Nyhus. “The music rings out, you hear the crowd roaring, the adrenaline rushes. Everyone is pretty excited to come home.

Content of the article

“I obviously like to play at home. We had a pretty good home record in 2019 (5-0, including the playoffs), and hopefully we can keep going. We have a good fan base here in Saskatoon, and it’s good to bring a regular season back to the community.

Saturday’s home opener packs more punch than most, given the shortened season. The teams have two games less to make their case for a playoff berth, and Nyhus said the tension was there.

“I wouldn’t say we feel the pressure (of a shorter season) but we definitely recognize it’s there,” he said. “We know there is increased intensity; everything is urgent. Every game counts so much more with the six game season. “

Huskies head coach Scott Flory, meanwhile, has said the outright victory over UBC is important to the team as they seek to make their mark on the 2021 campaign.

“It brought us back to who we are,” he said. “There is so much in Calgary that we had to eliminate because it wasn’t who and what we are. We strive for this progress – we improve every day. Incrementalism is important to us.

Alberta started their season with a 44-19 victory over UBC before falling 31-17 to Manitoba.

In other Canada West games this weekend, 1-1 Calgary – after a 34-21 loss to the Regina Rams – will play in Winnipeg on Saturday against 2-0 Manitoba, and the Rams 1-1 host 0- 2 UBC.

kemitchell@postmedia.com

twitter.com/kmitchsp

News seems to fly to us faster all the time. From COVID-19 updates to politics and crime and everything in between, it can be hard to keep pace. With that in mind, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix has created an Afternoon Headlines newsletter that can be delivered daily to your inbox to help you stay on top of the day’s most important news. Click here to subscribe.



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Hartley sports shorts; Wednesday October 13 https://scbwicanada.org/hartley-sports-shorts-wednesday-october-13/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 05:19:05 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/hartley-sports-shorts-wednesday-october-13/ Sports by Hartley Miller from 12:05 am on Wednesday 13 October WHL (PG Cougars) The Prince George Cougars have reduced their squad to 23. The Cougars traded 20-year-old defenseman Majid Kaddoura to the Moose Jaw Warriors for a 7th-round pick in the 2023 WHL Prospects draft and they fired 18-year-old forward Mike Svenson to the […]]]>

Sports by Hartley Miller from 12:05 am on Wednesday 13 October

WHL (PG Cougars)

The Prince George Cougars have reduced their squad to 23.

The Cougars traded 20-year-old defenseman Majid Kaddoura to the Moose Jaw Warriors for a 7th-round pick in the 2023 WHL Prospects draft and they fired 18-year-old forward Mike Svenson to the League Winkler Flyers. Manitoba junior hockey.

PG now has three goalies, seven defenders and 13 forwards.

Connor Bowie, Taylor Gauthier and Jonny Hooker are the club’s three 20-year-olds.

The (0-3) Cougars host the (1-3) Victoria Royals Saturday night at 7 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m.

Prince George has his next six games against Victoria.

The Cougars scored 11 goals while relinquishing a high of 19 in the Western Conference.

The PG Cougars regular season schedule is here.

The WHL ranking is here.


BCHL
(PG Kings of the Spruce)

The (1-1) Spruce Kings entertain the (0-2) Merritt Centennials on Friday and Saturday in their first home games of the season.

The Spruce Kings regular season schedule is here.
The BCHL ranking is here.

NHL:

(Start of the regular season)

Pittsburgh 6 Tampa Bay 2

Vegas 4 Seattle 3

The Vancouver Canucks, who finished 2-5 in the preseason, start their regular season with six straight away games tonight at 7 p.m. PST in Edmonton.

Canucks forward Brock Boeser will start the season in the injured reserve.

The Canucks schedule is here.

British Columbia Elite Hockey League: (Cariboo Cougars & Northern Capitals)

(U18AAA)

The (3-3) Cariboo Cougars will host the (4-1-0-1) Vancouver Northwest Hawks on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at Kin 1.

The Cariboo Cougars schedule is here.

(WOMEN U18 AAA)

The (4-3-0-1) Northern Capitals return to action on October 23-24 as they visit the (2-2) Vancouver Island Seals.

The northern capitals schedule is here.

National league

LA Dodgers 7 San Francisco 2

The series is tied 2-2 with the fifth and decisive game Thursday night at 6:07 am in San Francisco.

Atlanta 5 Milwaukee 4

The Braves win the series 3-1 to qualify for the NLCS against the Dodgers or Giants.


American league

Houston 10 Chicago White Sox 1

The Astros win the series 3-1 to advance to the best of 7 American League Championships against the Boston Red Sox starting Friday in Houston.

The MLB playoff schedule is here.

Column:

NFL:

Week six of the NFL season begins Thursday night with (4-1) Tampa Bay versus (2-3) Philadelphia.

After five weeks, Arizona are the only undefeated team at 5-0 while Jacksonville and Detroit are the only teams without a win at 0-5.

The NFL rankings are here.

The NFL regular season schedule is here.

The NFL odds are here.

LCF:

The BC Lions are back in action on Saturday at 4 p.m. when they host Calgary.

Week 11 begins Friday night at 6 p.m. with Winnipeg in Edmonton.

Ranking :

Where is: Winnipeg 8-1, Saskatchewan 5-4, BC 4-4, Calgary 4-5 and Edmonton 2-6
East: Toronto 6-3, Montreal 4-4, Hamilton 4-5 and Ottawa 2-7.

The CFL schedule is here.

Canada West Soccer: (UNBC Timberwolves)

The UNBC Timberwolves visit the Fraser Valley Cascades as part of Canada West Men’s and Women’s Soccer Friday night and Sunday afternoon.

The UNBC men have one win, four losses and three draws after eight games, while the UNBC women have one win, six losses and one draw.

The ranking of women is right here while the ranking of men is right here.

The Timberwolves, with just four games to play in both divisions, end their regular season by hosting Thompson Rivers on Oct. 23-24 at Masich Place with the women to play at noon, followed by the men at 2:15.



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Police find 174 guns in elderly home during welfare check https://scbwicanada.org/police-find-174-guns-in-elderly-home-during-welfare-check/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 23:06:37 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/police-find-174-guns-in-elderly-home-during-welfare-check/ Vancouver Police said they seized more than 170 guns from a South Granville senior citizen’s residence during a welfare check last week. Officers, along with staff from Vancouver Coastal Health, visited a house near West 15th Avenue and Granville Street to check on a 76-year-old man at the request of his doctor as part of […]]]>

Vancouver Police said they seized more than 170 guns from a South Granville senior citizen’s residence during a welfare check last week.

Officers, along with staff from Vancouver Coastal Health, visited a house near West 15th Avenue and Granville Street to check on a 76-year-old man at the request of his doctor as part of Car 87, a program that pairs an undercover police officer with a registered nurse or psychiatric nurse to do on-site assessments during mental health crises.

Police say the man suffers from dementia and physical health problems.

Most of the 174 guns found in the house were vintage and World War II.

“The guns were all seized because they were not stored safely,” said const. Tania Visintin with the Vancouver Police Department in a statement.

The man was taken to hospital to be seen by a psychiatric professional, she said.



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