Regional chapters – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 07:37:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png Regional chapters – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 The trial of the “less than efficient” regional banking hub https://scbwicanada.org/the-trial-of-the-less-than-efficient-regional-banking-hub/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 06:27:43 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-trial-of-the-less-than-efficient-regional-banking-hub/ The Reserve Bank found that a trial of regional banking centers had “not been successful”, describing them as “less than effective”. The hubs review, released to 1News under the Official Information Act, revealed a range of problems. They include: lack of privacy and security issues, unresponsive phone support, and unreliable/out-of-order service. “Communities have been disappointed […]]]>

The Reserve Bank found that a trial of regional banking centers had “not been successful”, describing them as “less than effective”.

The hubs review, released to 1News under the Official Information Act, revealed a range of problems. They include: lack of privacy and security issues, unresponsive phone support, and unreliable/out-of-order service.

“Communities have been disappointed with the limited and sometimes unreliable services hubs provide,” the Reserve Bank said.

“The frustration that hubs aren’t providing what locals want hurts the customer experience and undermines communities’ trust and willingness to use them.”

The hubs started in 2020 and are a partnership between the government and the NZ Bankers Association, on behalf of the big six banks.

They include smart ATMs, a tablet for online banking and a priority phone line. They can be found in places like pharmacies or community centers.

NZ Bankers Association chief executive Roger Beaumont said improvements had been made to the hubs.

“Yes, there have been some technical issues…that’s why in phase two of the hubs, we’re going to expand and improve them to provide a better customer experience,” Beaumont said.

The four initial hubs are in Twizel, Stoke, Martinborough and Opunake. Next year the trial will be expanded to include Whangamatā, Ōpōtiki, Tūrangi and Waimate.

Improvements include greater privacy and access to specialist banking staff.

“Hubs aim to provide a solution for customers, especially in smaller towns, who for whatever reason are not yet comfortable with the digital or online environment,” said Beaumont.

In Stoke, there was an outcry when the last bank closed in 2018. Nelson Gray Power chair Sue Sara said members loved their banking centre.

“A lot of them don’t have internet, like with the hub. They can go there, there’s always someone available to help them set up automatic payments, have their kitchen guide them throughout. It’s absolutely wonderful.”

In the review, the Reserve Bank also looked at the broader issue of baking in the regions.

“Even if the hubs are improved, our work to date suggests that they will never be, at best, more than a partial solution to a continued reduction in cash and banking services in the regions.”

Other options listed include a code of conduct for bank closures and requiring banks to provide a certain level of service.

Finance Minister Grant Robertson said all options are worth considering.

“Well obviously there are things like what’s done in other countries, things like minimum codes for banks. Arrangements that they have to follow if they choose to close a branch.”

He says the purpose of the banking center trial was to determine what worked and what didn’t.

“I’m sure the result will be better services in the long run.”

National revenue spokesman Andrew Bayly said it was crucial the government got it right.

“At the end of the day, we need to ensure that people living in rural areas have access to excellent, locally-provided bakery services.”

He said it’s especially important for people with disabilities and connectivity issues.

“If the hub concept doesn’t work, we’ll have to consider other options,” Bayly said.

Most banks have said they won’t close any more regional branches until at least the end of 2023.

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Local sorority hosts community health fair at Valley Healthcare Center https://scbwicanada.org/local-sorority-hosts-community-health-fair-at-valley-healthcare-center/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 01:02:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/local-sorority-hosts-community-health-fair-at-valley-healthcare-center/ COLUMBUS, Ga. (WTVM) – Last Saturday was “Stay Well Columbus Day” – a day to help build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines. The three local chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated along with the Cobb Institute and the “We Can Do This” campaign held a community health fair at the Valley Healthcare Center. The show […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ga. (WTVM) – Last Saturday was “Stay Well Columbus Day” – a day to help build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines.

The three local chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated along with the Cobb Institute and the “We Can Do This” campaign held a community health fair at the Valley Healthcare Center.

The show offered educational resources, the chance to receive COVID-19 vaccines and reminders, a panel moderated by our Dee Armstrong to ask questions about the vaccine and doctors – all on site for people to ask questions. . Of course, there was also fun for the kids with music, Kona Ice, food and more. State and city leaders at the event said it was important to continue helping underserved communities understand the importance of knowing what’s best for their health.

“It’s very important to serve especially in unserved communities, so they can get first-hand information,” District 136 State Representative Carolyn Hughley said. How often do you go out on Saturdays and can you ask your favorite doctor about anything that concerns you. »

Columbus Mayor Skip Henderson attended the event along with a host of area organizations and law enforcement agencies. To date, more than 7,300 people have attended variations of these pop-up health fairs, with more than 2,100 of them deciding to get vaccinated.

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Nikwasi-Cherokee Cultural Heritage Corridor Pilgrimage held in conjunction with the Trail of Tears Association’s 25th Annual Conference https://scbwicanada.org/nikwasi-cherokee-cultural-heritage-corridor-pilgrimage-held-in-conjunction-with-the-trail-of-tears-associations-25th-annual-conference/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 15:22:04 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/nikwasi-cherokee-cultural-heritage-corridor-pilgrimage-held-in-conjunction-with-the-trail-of-tears-associations-25th-annual-conference/ By Kristin Fox Western North Carolina hosted the Nikwasi-Cherokee Cultural Heritage Corridor Pilgrimage. The three-day event was held concurrently with the 25e Annual Trail of Tears Conference and Symposium in Franklin, Bryson City and Cherokee. The Trail of Tears Association (TOTA) is a nonprofit organization established in 1993 to support the creation, development, and interpretation […]]]>

By Kristin Fox

Western North Carolina hosted the Nikwasi-Cherokee Cultural Heritage Corridor Pilgrimage. The three-day event was held concurrently with the 25e Annual Trail of Tears Conference and Symposium in Franklin, Bryson City and Cherokee.

The Trail of Tears Association (TOTA) is a nonprofit organization established in 1993 to support the creation, development, and interpretation of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. TOTA, a citizens’ organization of national and international members, has state chapters in nine states through which the Trail passes.

Participating in the pilgrimage were TOTA members from Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. The group traveled from Harrah’s Convention Center in Cherokee to Franklin to historic Nikwasi to begin the pilgrimage.

The group was welcomed to Franklin by the master of ceremonies, Bob McCollum of the Nikwasi Initiative. Jim Tate, Chairman of the Macon County Commissioner, delivered the Macon County welcome address, followed by a welcome on behalf of North Carolina by D. Reid Wilson, Secretary of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources of the North Carolina.

“As secretary, one of my top priorities in our department is to ensure that we tell more inclusive, accurate and representative stories about the people and history of our state, a long and rich history and sometimes complicated that started with the American Indians,” Wilson said. “As a department, we want to bring more attention to the story of the Trail of Tears and teach future generations about this important story.”

“New evidence has led to the identification of a Trail of Tears (TOT) route through 40 miles of Macon County with many miles of original trails surviving on land currently held by the state, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI), Mainspring Conservation Trust or US Forest Service,” Wilson added. “This course, which has not been certified by the National Park Service, a milestone that has been discussed with the department, presents an opportunity unique for various partnerships to develop public review corridors, greenways and trails so that more people can experience the original trail as it was or as close to what it was as possible so that people can understand the ancient Cherokee homeland.

Other local dignitaries in attendance included Macon County Commissioner Ronnie Beale, North Carolina Senator Kevin Corbin and North Carolina State Representative Karl Gillespie. National Park Services and Trail of Tears Superintendent Aaron Mahr also hosted the group in Macon County.

On behalf of Chief Richard Sneed, Senior Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, who was unable to attend the pilgrimage because he was called to Washington, DC, Shana Bushyhead Condill, EBCI Citizen and Executive Director of the Museum of the Cherokee Indians, welcomed the group to Nikwasi, one of the most sacred sites of the Cherokee.

“As we consider our role as protectors of our cultural heritage, protecting our sacred sites is a responsibility we take incredibly seriously,” Condill said. “We will always advocate for the highest level of protection when for so long, too long, these places were not under our control.”

“The eastern band has done a lot of work to regain control of these sacred sites, but there is still a lot to do,” she added. “As you hear about this sacred place, I hope we can continue to collaborate in a way that is most respectful of its continued importance to us as the Cherokee people.”

After the speakers at the future home of the EBCI Museum and the tour of the historic Nikwasi mound, the group walked across the street to the Mainspring Conservation Trust for lunch and speakers. Stacy Guffey of Franklin City Council and the Cowee School Arts and Heritage Center and Elaine Eisernbraun of the Nikwasi Initiative hosted the group at the Mainspring campus.

The group then traveled to Cowee for a program at the EBCI Community Forest presented by Ben Steere, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Sociology, and Brett Riggs, Sequoyah Professor Emeritus of Cherokee Studies, at Western Carolina University. Attendees had the chance to walk through the unique forest and delve into the ancient history of Cowee, including the archeology of the area. The presentation in Cowee discussed the community at the 19e century, his role in Euchellah v. Welch and its relevance to remoteness as it stands on the Trail of Tears.

McCollum and Guffey hosted the group in a program at the Cowee School & Heritage Center. Dr. Bill Jurgelski presented a program “To keep your lands separate between you, the reservations, the withdrawal and the treaty of 1819 in western North Carolina”. Following a reception, Lamar Marshall, Director of Southeast Heritage Research, presented a TOT program through Raven Creek Settlement. Marshall worked hard to create a map that was presented to the group showing the TOT route and its many walking trails discovered in Macon County.

While visiting the Cowee area, the group had the opportunity to tour the Cowee housing estate and mound. The city was located along a major trade route in a bend in the Little Tennessee River, one of the most important central Cherokee cities. It was an important center for trade and diplomacy in the 18e century.

The pilgrimage ended with a program at Kituwah Town & Mound, located between Cherokee and Bryson City. Kituwah was the great mother city of the Cherokee people. The old town square remained in the possession of the Cherokee people until 1821. One hundred and seventy-six years later, the EBCI purchased the property, Restaurant Kituwah, properly called Ani-Kituwagi or the people of Kituwah.

The Kituwah welcome ceremony included Yana Wade, EBCI Cultural Heritage, Cherokee royalty Amy West and Leroy Littlejohn. After a traditional dinner, participants attended a cultural ceremony featuring flautist Jarrett Gray Wilcatt, TOTA President Jack Baker, storyteller Kathy Littlejohn, the Raven Rock Dancers and the Warriors of Ani Kituwah. The program ended with a parting prayer from Tom Belt.

The Trail of Tears, designated a National Historic Trail by Congress in 1987, commemorates the forced displacement of the Cherokee people from their homeland in the southeastern United States to Indian Territory, present-day Oklahoma, in 1838 to 1839.

In 1993, TOTA entered into a cooperative agreement with the National Park Service (NPS) to promote and engage in the protection and preservation of the resources of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Additionally, the agreement promotes awareness of the legacy of the trails, including the effects of the U.S. government’s Indian removal policy on the Cherokee and other tribes, primarily the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee Creek and Seminole, and to perpetuate management and development techniques. consistent with the NPS trail map.

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ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter Honors Local Professionals and Announces 2022-23 Board of Directors https://scbwicanada.org/aspa-buffalo-niagara-chapter-honors-local-professionals-and-announces-2022-23-board-of-directors/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 11:06:55 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/aspa-buffalo-niagara-chapter-honors-local-professionals-and-announces-2022-23-board-of-directors/ Pictured, left to right: Chris Marcello, MPA; Kara Kane, MA; Atta A. Ceesay, Ph.D.; and Makenzie Doctor, MPA. (Pictures sent) Wed Sep 21, 2022 7:00 AM Special donation made to the WNY Resource Council ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter – the local chapter of the American Society for Public Administration – announced the recipients of its […]]]>

Pictured, left to right: Chris Marcello, MPA; Kara Kane, MA; Atta A. Ceesay, Ph.D.; and Makenzie Doctor, MPA. (Pictures sent)

Wed Sep 21, 2022 7:00 AM

Special donation made to the WNY Resource Council

ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter – the local chapter of the American Society for Public Administration – announced the recipients of its third annual awards program, along with the 2022-23 officers and board members, at its recent annual meeting. 2022.

The ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter has recognized the following individuals for their “outstanding contributions in the field of public administration”:

√ Excellence in Government Administration: Kara Kane, MA, Public Information Officer, Erie County Health Department

√ Excellence in Teaching Public Administration: Atta A. Ceesay, Ph.D., President and Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Administration, SUNY Buffalo State

In lieu of a 2022 award for excellence in nonprofit administration, the ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter raised $200 in donations for the WNY Resource Council, a forward-thinking social service organization of the response to the May tragedy on Jefferson Avenue.

Following the presentation of the awards, the ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter held elections for a slate of officers and board members for the year 2022-23. The new Chapter Chair is Chris Marcello, MPA, Director of the Western Field Office of the New York State Office of Mental Health. He lives in North Buffalo with his wife and two sons.

In addition to Marcello, the officers are:

√ President Elect: Ryan Gadzo, MPA, Erie County Senior Services

√ Past President: Makenzie Doctor, MPA, SUNY Buffalo State

√ Secretary: Marisa Maloni, MPA, New York State Unified Court System

√ Treasurer: Kenneth Stone, MPA, Buffalo & Erie County Public Library

√ Communications Manager: Tony Astran, MPA, APR, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center / New York State Smokers’ Quitline

√ Membership Officer: Brian Poliner, MPA, Ph.D., New York State Assembly

The members of the council are:

√ Brian Bray, MPA, Erie County Personnel Department

√ Maria Garozzo-Payne, MPA, City of Buffalo Department of Assessment & Taxation (retired)

√ Michael Hughes, MPA, US Citizenship and Immigration Service

√ Kara Kane, MA, Erie County Health Department

√ Rosaleen Nogle, MPA, PE, BCEE, PMP, Buffalo Sewer Authority

√ Lisa Parshall, Ph.D., Daemen University

√ Gordon Stewart III, MPA, Niagara Falls Fire Department

Nationally, the American Society for Public Administration has 61 local chapters and nearly 10,000 members. The organization strives to advance the art, science, teaching, and practice of public and nonprofit administration. Locally, the ASPA Buffalo Niagara Chapter was relaunched in 2018 and now has 30 members and continues to grow. The organization regularly co-sponsors the annual Public Service Appreciation Week conference in April at SUNY Buffalo State. More information is available at https://www.aspabuffaloniagara.org and on the chapter’s social media sites on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

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DAR will ring the bells for Constitution Week – Shelby County Reporter https://scbwicanada.org/dar-will-ring-the-bells-for-constitution-week-shelby-county-reporter/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 18:25:02 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/dar-will-ring-the-bells-for-constitution-week-shelby-county-reporter/ DAR will ring the bells for Constitution Week Posted at 1:20 p.m. on Friday, September 16, 2022 STAFF REPORTS The local David Lindsay Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution began its annual September meeting with Chapter Registrar Judith Kennedy Arthur inducting three of its members, Mary Harris, Elizabeth Cook and Senator April Weaver. […]]]>

DAR will ring the bells for Constitution Week

Posted at 1:20 p.m. on Friday, September 16, 2022

STAFF REPORTS

The local David Lindsay Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution began its annual September meeting with Chapter Registrar Judith Kennedy Arthur inducting three of its members, Mary Harris, Elizabeth Cook and Senator April Weaver. Everyone received a rose with their new membership package.

All inductees have an American patriot who fought in the American Revolution. Senator April Weaver’s Patriot is the chapter’s namesake (David Lindsay) who is buried in Maylene, the site of his historic cemetery on the property he purchased when his family first settled in Shelby County.

Chapter regent Stella Tipton said she was working with others to explore an exciting idea for the development of a patriotic trail that would map historic sites such as David Lindsay’s historic grave and other historic treasures such as the George Washington Museum in Columbiana.

“We have such a young nation, and the timing to complete a project of this magnitude would be truly meaningful,” said Tipton, “if we can start now and finish it before we celebrate our 250th anniversary on July 4, 2026.”

Tipton said the idea came to her while she was laying out the grave site in May.

“National DAR supports such projects with small grants to help local chapters, like ours,” Tipton said. “We will see where it leads. Hopefully something we can all be proud of here in Shelby County.

The chapter received a proclamation from the entire Shelby County legislative delegation, marking the 235th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution of the United States of America at the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787. The proclamation was presented to Chapter members and Constitutional Chair, Jenny Mumpower, by Senator April Weaver.

Constitution Week is celebrated from September 17 to 23 every year. This celebration of the constitution was started by the Daughters of the American Revolution. In 1955, the DAR asked Congress to set aside this week each year to commemorate the history and importance of the constitution.

“It was a real special honor to have all eleven members of our legislative delegation here in Shelby County sign the Constitution Week Proclamation,” Tipton said. “Our chapter has celebrated Constitution Week here in Shelby County since 1955-56. We were privileged to receive the Proclamation presented by Senator Weaver. The Legislative Delegation Proclamation encourages all citizens to recognize and appreciate the importance of this enduring document to our nation and to reaffirm our commitment to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in this great nation.

The chapter also enjoyed a presentation from Mary Harris as she donated a book on the constitution to the Columbiana Library where the chapter meets.

Chapter members received a special bell at the September meeting and will ring them this Saturday, September 17 at 4 p.m. sharp in Shelby County. Many other members of the Daughters of the American Revolution will also gather across the country to ring the bells, just as the church bells of Philadelphia rang when the constitution was signed in 1787.

The Chapter invites everyone to join Constitutional Chairperson Jenny Mumpower next week as she visits various Shelby County libraries dressed in her period costume, helping elementary school children learn about the constitution through interactive programs.

“We’re so proud of Jenny,” Tipton said. “She and our former regent, Phoebe Robinson, did so much to pave the way for our chapter’s focus on educating our younger generation, not only about our founding fathers, but also about the constitution.”

Visit Davidlindsaynsdar.weebly.com to join or visit the chapter.

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APC Group urges Tinubu to stop mass member defections https://scbwicanada.org/apc-group-urges-tinubu-to-stop-mass-member-defections/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 11:02:46 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/apc-group-urges-tinubu-to-stop-mass-member-defections/ APC presidential candidate, Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu Sept. 14 (THEWILL) – Former All Progressive Congress (APC) aspirants under the APC360 umbrella, have called on the party’s presidential candidate, Bola Ahmed Tinubu, to take urgent action to prevent the “dangerous” trend of defection or risk seeing the party defeated in the 2023 elections. Defections from the […]]]>
APC presidential candidate, Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu
WILL 2 APP ADVERTISEMENTS

Sept. 14 (THEWILL) – Former All Progressive Congress (APC) aspirants under the APC360 umbrella, have called on the party’s presidential candidate, Bola Ahmed Tinubu, to take urgent action to prevent the “dangerous” trend of defection or risk seeing the party defeated in the 2023 elections.

Defections from the APC have been reported in some states since the conclusion of the party’s primaries. While at least eight senators had dropped out of the party, including Senate majority and minority leaders, 25 House of Representatives lawmakers also defected.

Party state chapters in Gombe, Katsina, Sokoto, Adamawa, Bauchi, Rivers, Akwa Ibom, Ogun, Edo among others are reportedly collapsing due to mass defections.

More than a dozen state chapters are also in the throes of crisis over fears the party cannot forge a strong unity to mount a successful election campaign.

Therefore, all the aspirants, who contested various elected positions in the party primaries of the 36 states of the federation and Abuja, gathered in Abuja on Tuesday, where they sounded the alarm of an alleged imminent danger in the left.

APC360 national secretary Chris Enoch, in a statement after the meeting, said APC supporters were deeply concerned that the party hierarchy had yet to stop the situation.

Enoch said the development “is also dangerous and harmful to the health and wealth of our great party, especially as we prepare for a national election.

“We, as members of the only pressure group who have invested in this great party through direct buy-in to expressions of interest and nomination forms etc. are concerned because we believe that the massive decamping that is surreptitiously being carried out, is planned and calculated to thwart Tinubu’s victory in the upcoming general election by those with accounts to settle with the party or who hold grudges, and at this end, work against the party.

“Some of these defection cases are sponsored by powerful members who feel dissatisfied with the mood and the way the party has treated them with the conduct of the primaries, while others have arisen out of the allegation that the party hierarchy abandoned them and relegated them to the background after the victory, without recognizing or rewarding them for their enormous efforts and strong commitment to the party before the victory.

“We, as party stakeholders, can no longer sit on our hips and pretend that all is well, while a large number of important members, especially the aspirants in the 2013, 2015 and 2022 primaries, decamp to strengthen the opposition parties which give them attentive ears. .”

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2023: What is the political value of Wike? https://scbwicanada.org/2023-what-is-the-political-value-of-wike/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 05:40:43 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/2023-what-is-the-political-value-of-wike/ Why Rivers State Governor Nyesom Wike becoming the most wanted figure in the Nigerian political space ahead of the 2023 general election? What is the limit of its influence? Can he decide who wins or loses the presidential election scheduled for February 25, 2023? LLove her or hate her, the governor of this oil-rich state […]]]>

Why Rivers State Governor Nyesom Wike becoming the most wanted figure in the Nigerian political space ahead of the 2023 general election? What is the limit of its influence? Can he decide who wins or loses the presidential election scheduled for February 25, 2023?

LLove her or hate her, the governor of this oil-rich state has become the proverbial beautiful wife of Nigerian politics, courted and sought after by various suitors. He is serenaded by bids from major presidential candidates and parties in an almost similar way he and “his band” entertain Nigerians on his political outings.

Wike, who has remained in the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) since emerging into the political space as local government chairman and federal minister, became a wanted wife after losing the party’s presidential ticket to a former vice president and serial contender, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, who won 371 votes to Wike’s 237.

Atiku’s choice of Delta State Governor Ifeanyi Okowa as his running mate despite Wike’s alleged recommendation by the former’s selection committee has strained their relationship. It has been reported that Wike felt betrayed as it was Atiku and his camp who convinced him to consider the post of vice president after losing the primary in Abuja. Separately, the former vice president’s camp had proposed a joint Atiku-Wike ticket before the primary, which was rejected by the governor, who also decided to test its popularity and acceptance with party delegates. Had it not been for Sokoto Governor Aminu Tambuwal’s last-minute decision to stand down for Atiku in the primary, Wike would have landed the party’s presidential ticket.

Wike, together with his team, hosted All Progressives Congress (APC) presidential candidate Ahmed Bola Tinubu, Labor Party (LP) presidential candidate Peter Obi and Atiku in London where matters of political interest were discussed . Former President Olusegun Obasanjo also attended the meeting with Obi.

Governor de Rivers had over the past two weeks hosted some prominent APC leaders such as Kayode Fayemi from Ekiti State, Babajide Sanwo-Olu from Lagos, Rotimi Akeredolu from Ondo and David Umahi from Ebonyi State.

Other senior APC leaders who have visited Governor Nyesom Wike’s residence in Port Harcourt are former Federation Cabinet Secretary Babachir Lawal and a former Speaker of the House of Representatives, Yakubu Dogara.

These visits by presidential candidates and their followers are seen as a way of courting Wike to support their ambitions.

Wike’s influence within the PDP grew when he became the rallying voice of the PDP in 2015 after the party lost the presidential election to the APC. While prominent leaders defected to the APC or withdrew after defeat, Wike mobilized resources to keep the party afloat. He, alongside a former Ekiti of State governor, Ayodele Fayose, was the most vocal among opposition figures criticizing the federal government led by Muhammadu Buhari.

With sufficient financial resources for most state chapters of the PDP, Wike became influential in determining state executives and winning their loyalty. No wonder he and his camp have also decided the chairman and majority of the party’s National Working Committee since 2015. From Senator Ali Modu Sheriff to Ahmed Makarfi, Uche Secondus and the party’s current National Chairman, Iyorchia Ayu , the camp of Governor Wike was the main determinant of their emergence, as well as their departure from high office.

In response to Ayu’s insistence that he not quit, Wike said, “Dr. Ayu said we were kids. Yeah, the kids pulled you out of the gutter to make you president.

Wike’s generosity to the state chapters, NWC, as well as his ability to resist the workings of the APC-led federal government, brought him close to the hearts of many party stakeholders.

He also used his well-oiled presidential campaign tour to win more friends and party loyalists. He visited all 36 states of the country, including the Federal Capital Territory, where he solicited votes and made many friends. Sources close to his presidential campaign team tell our correspondent that the governor handed out huge sums of money to party leaders in every state he visited during the campaign.

Governor Wike’s influence is believed to transcend Rivers State and South-South as he also controls the structure of the PDP in the Southeast. For example, he enjoys the support of Abia State Governor Okezie Ikpeazu, Governor Ifeanyi Ugwuanyi of Enugu, party members in Ebonyi and Anambra and to some extent Imo. However, Atiku loyalists such as a former governor of Imo, Emeka Ihedioha, Senator Ben Obi, Senator Chris Uba and Senator Uche Ekwunife reduced his influence in Imo and Anambra states. .

Ugwuanyi, who led PDP governors in the Southeast to endorse Wike in the PDP presidential primary, is reportedly uncomfortable with negotiations with other parties by Governor Rivers’ camp.

In the South West, the region’s only PDP governor to date, Seyi Makinde of Oyo State, is a prominent voice in Wike’s camp. Former governors Olusegun Mimiko of Ondo and Fayose of Ekiti are also with him.

With the party polarized in Ogun and Osun states, a former PDP national vice president and leader in Lagos, Chief Olabode George, who commissioned projects in Rivers state on Thursday, agrees also with Wike that Ayu must leave before the campaign begins.

Governor de Rivers has also been able to extend his influence to the north, where he counts among his prominent loyalists Governor Samuel Ortom of Benue State, former Governor of Gombe State, Ibrahim Dankwambo, former Minister of Justice and Prosecutor General, Mohammed Adoke. . During the PDP’s presidential primary, delegates from Kano, believed to be former Governor Rabiu Kwankwaso’s loyalists, openly showed their support for Wike by wearing caps with his picture on it. He also showed his influence in Kogi State when he backed Tajudeen Yusuf, Member of the House of Representatives, to defeat Atiku loyalist and former Senator, Dino Melaye, in the Kogi senatorial primary election. West.

He also has good relations with Senator Philip Aduda, who represents the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), former Senator Garba Lado (Katsina), a former First Lady of Niger State, Zainab Kure, candidate for governorship of the PDP in Nasarawa, David Ombugadu, among other party leaders in the North.

Wike traveled with some of his allies, including a former Governor of Cross River State, Donald Duke, to different countries, where they strategized. The Daily Trust learned on Sunday that regular meetings between camp members have strengthened their bond.

He is also beloved by the people of Rivers State because of the development projects he undertook as governor. Even his biggest critics will admit that while his policies are combative, they are also progressive and developmental; this is why he is nicknamed Mr Project.

The state remained one of the strongholds of the PDP, even during the presidential elections. For example, former President Goodluck Jonathan won 1,487,075 votes to Buhari’s 69,238 in 2015 despite Governor Rotimi Amaechi’s defection to the APC. Additionally, in 2019, Atiku secured 473,971 votes to defeat President Buhari, who had 150,710. However, results were not collated for six local government areas: Bonn, Asari Toru, Okrika, Ikwerre and Ahoada West and Emohua.

INEC’s recent innovations have lowered the number of “votes” coming from River State.

Also, Wike shouldn’t have it easy, especially since there are forces that can threaten his influence.

The cold war between him and Atiku recently took on another dimension when the governor alleged that some politicians were plotting to wreak havoc in the state.

He made the allegation on a statewide broadcast days after stripping Atiku supporters in the state of their various party leadership positions. Those affected include a former state governor, Celestine Omehia, a former Deputy Speaker of the House of Representatives, Austin Opara, and Senator Lee Meaba.

While Meaba was removed from his position as chairman of the board of trustees of the public polytechnic Elechi Amadi, Austin Opara and Celestine Omehia were removed from their positions as party leaders in the local government areas of Port Harcourt City and Ikwerre. Our correspondent learned that their withdrawal was the result of their secret romance with Atiku. The trio reportedly attended several meetings with Atiku without Governor Wike’s permission.

“Wike doesn’t hide the fact that he’s fighting Atiku. And he said he’s ready to fight until the end.

“We don’t know what he intends to do because when the campaigns start we are also qualified to campaign. We are waiting to see how he would prevent us from campaigning. This is a joke taken too far.

“Yes, he called Omehia and Chief Opara as party leaders in Ikwerre and Port Harcourt City and humiliated them in front of their people because we went to pay a solidarity visit to Atiku.

“We all knew Atiku before him. Austin Opara, who has served in the House of Representatives since 1999, was vice president when Atiku was vice president. At that time, Wike was struggling to be chairman of the local government. So if Opara has to ask him for permission to see Atiku, then something is wrong,” Sen. Maeba said, adding that no one is in charge of Rivers’ votes.

Wike and the “Obidient” movement

The majority of Igbo youths in Rivers State support Peter Obi, the Labor Party presidential candidate. Last Saturday’s solidarity match in Port Harcourt, the state capital, in favor of Obi’s presidential candidacy is an indicator that the ‘Obidient’ factor would take a good chunk of the vote count in the State.

The Igbo race, to which Obi belongs, constitutes a good percentage of all registered voters in the state.

As Wike struggles to stay in his beloved PDP, he fears he will be rendered useless by Atiku’s men after the election, especially as his influence is set to wane after he leaves office on the 29th. May 2023.

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New York’s new gun law goes ahead despite judge calling it ‘unconstitutional’ https://scbwicanada.org/new-yorks-new-gun-law-goes-ahead-despite-judge-calling-it-unconstitutional/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 22:12:39 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/new-yorks-new-gun-law-goes-ahead-despite-judge-calling-it-unconstitutional/ ALBANY — On the first day the state’s new gun laws took effect Thursday, New Yorkers received a series of mixed messages about what to expect moving forward. First, a federal judge in Syracuse declined to issue an injunction preventing the new laws from taking effect in a ruling in which he also detailed the […]]]>

ALBANY — On the first day the state’s new gun laws took effect Thursday, New Yorkers received a series of mixed messages about what to expect moving forward.

First, a federal judge in Syracuse declined to issue an injunction preventing the new laws from taking effect in a ruling in which he also detailed the many ways he ruled the law was “unconstitutional.”

Governor Kathy Hochul held a press conference in Manhattan this week with New York City Mayor Eric Adams, touting the new gun laws and pledging to “continue to lead the way and implement a common-sense gun safety legislation” that she says is meant to protect New Yorkers. armed violence. New signs were quickly put up, pointing to gun-free zones everywhere from the State Capitol to Times Square.

Amid these conflicting elements, law enforcement officials and county clerks juggle relatively high levels of requests for concealed carry firearms permits, often from citizens who are unsure. of any new details and whether their requests will be granted.

“It’s just mass confusion,” Albany County Sheriff Craig Apple said.

The sheriff’s office has received triple the number of applications since the US Supreme Court struck down the state’s existing laws in late June, with 147 appointments expected – far more than a similar period last year, did he declare.

But as local authorities track new concealed carry laws, pro-Second Amendment groups are expressing frustration and hinting they will bring additional legal challenges to the rules. Proponents seeking to stem gun violence have argued that the expanded regulations would reduce gun crime – even though most gun crime is linked to illegal weapons.

“As gun violence continues to affect communities across the country, today’s decision is a victory in our efforts to protect New Yorkers,” said State Attorney General Letitia James. , in a press release Wednesday evening. “Responsible gun control action saves lives, and any attempt by the gun lobby to tear down New York’s sensible gun control laws will be met with a fierce defense of the law. We will continue to defend the constitutionality of our laws to protect all New Yorkers.

At least one group involved in the case dismissed by U.S. District Judge Glenn T. Suddaby on Wednesday, Gun Owners of America New York, plans to return to federal court with an updated lawsuit.

Other lawsuits by gun rights groups or Republicans are pending, including by state Republican Party Chairman Nick Langworthy. Democratic lawmakers have shown no desire to return to Albany to fix any of the flaws Suddaby pointed out, even though those shortcomings leave the law vulnerable to reversal. The next legislative session is scheduled for January.

“We are working with top legal experts to ensure our case progresses successfully,” New York State GOP spokeswoman Jessica Proud said in a statement. “As we will fight this in court, we urge New Yorkers to exercise their rights in the voting booth in November as well.”

Democratic lawmakers passed sweeping gun restrictions in July on concealed carry, including requiring candidates to retrain for a license and take classes on how to store a gun in completely safe. The Concealed Carry Improvement Act was passed in a special session a week after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the state’s century-old law that required New Yorkers to show “good cause” to get a concealed carry permit for self-defense.

The Supreme Court’s ruling was quickly seen as one that could open the state up to easier access to firearms. Gun lobbies pushed for the decision while gun safety organizations, many of which formed in the wake of the proliferation of mass shootings in the country, fought against it.

As expected, state lawmakers returned to Albany after their summer recess to pass laws tailored to the Supreme Court’s decision. This resulted in a law that gun rights groups sought to overturn on the grounds that they claimed it violated constitutional rights. The case before Suddaby was filed by the national and New York chapters of Gun Owners of America, and on behalf of a Schenectady County man, Ivan Antonyuk.

Suddaby, one of the last judges appointed by President George W. Bush, described Antonyuk as a Ukrainian immigrant who likely has a “deep distrust of totalitarian regimes that offer few means of fighting crime to its citizens. “. He said the U.S. citizen “seems to have taken his oath of citizenship as seriously as native citizens would probably want” and therefore, according to the judge, Antonyuk is a law-abiding citizen.

The case was about whether Antonyuk and the gun rights group had the “capacity” to take legal action. The judge said a valid legal case could be based on challenging restrictions the state has placed on where someone can carry a gun. Places such as concerts, schools, healthcare facilities, Times Square, and public transportation are among the places where the law prohibits anyone from bringing a firearm. But Suddaby said the threat of arrest by law enforcement with a credible prosecution should be a precursor to supporting such a legal challenge seeking an injunction.

In his ruling, he said gun rights supporters could amend and refile a new application for a preliminary injunction. The judge acknowledged the “sense of security” a concealed weapon provides to those “too helpless to physically defend themselves in public without a handgun.”

“While pursuing the laudable goal of public safety and in an attempt to curb the ever-escalating mass shootings, the New York State Legislature has generated unconstitutional legislation,” Suddaby wrote.

The judge also described the drafting process as being ‘rushed’ and noted the list of ‘sensitive places’ where lawmakers say guns should not be allowed – except those with exemptions, such as retired police officers and law enforcement officials who are in good standing – is a “wish list”. He said the state made the law too broad by limiting a person’s ability to carry a gun for self-defense.

“The court finds it hard to imagine how a responsible, law-abiding citizen could ever ‘use’ a concealed handgun to defend himself in public against another person in a way that does not ‘endanger’ that other person. “, states Suddaby’s decision, referring to the language of the law.

The judge said the list of restricted places should be limited to schools, government buildings, legislatures, polling stations and courthouses.

He also said the state’s controversial background checks on social media applicants went too far because it violated Fifth Amendment rights. Suddaby explained that he believes people shouldn’t have to sacrifice their ability to obtain a concealed carry permit, which is their Second Amendment right, to exercise their right to express themselves online. If a candidate were to disclose what they posted on their social media accounts, it would violate their right to remain silent, he added.

Apple, the Albany County sheriff, said he instructed his office to rely on education rather than arrests. If someone is found to be carrying a concealed handgun in a sensitive location, they could be punished with a low-level criminal offense. But Apple said that as long as people aren’t intentionally trying to break the law, it hopes they’ll be willing to follow the rules once they understand them.

“The reality is most people are going to take responsibility, like they always have, and we’ll never know who has a gun and who doesn’t,” Apple said. “Heaven forbid, if the circumstances arise and they have to use it, I think the last concern they will have is whether they should have it there or not.”

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The chances of a special fall legislative session on abortion are fading. https://scbwicanada.org/the-chances-of-a-special-fall-legislative-session-on-abortion-are-fading/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 23:42:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/the-chances-of-a-special-fall-legislative-session-on-abortion-are-fading/ The prospect of state lawmakers returning to Springfield ahead of the November election for a special session to expand protections for reproductive health care in Illinois appears to be fading, even as providers and advocates for the abortion urge Democratic Governor JB Pritzker to come to their aid. Pritzker, who has made his support for […]]]>

The prospect of state lawmakers returning to Springfield ahead of the November election for a special session to expand protections for reproductive health care in Illinois appears to be fading, even as providers and advocates for the abortion urge Democratic Governor JB Pritzker to come to their aid.

Pritzker, who has made his support for abortion a central theme of his re-election campaign, announced his intention to convene lawmakers in special session “in the coming weeks” almost immediately after the U.S. Supreme Court released its June 24 decision reversing the federal protections granted by Roe v. Wade.

By July 5, that deadline had extended to “months to come,” according to a joint statement by Pritzker and the Democratic leaders of the Legislature, House Speaker Emanuel “Chris” Welch of Hillside and Senate Speaker Don Harmon. of Oak Park. There have been discussions behind the scenes of a possible return after Labor Day.

Now, despite positioning himself as a national leader on abortion rights, Pritzker defers to the legislature to know when the time is right to address issues such as allowing nurse practitioners and physician assistants perform abortions and extend legal protections for patients and health care workers.

“The Legislature needs to do its job, and it’s working hard,” Pritzker said Tuesday at a campaign event at Planned Parenthood of Illinois’ Loop headquarters.

Pritzker also acknowledged that for any measures passed before the end of the year to take effect immediately, near-unanimous support from Democratic supermajorities in the legislature would be needed. After January 1, these measures would only require a simple majority to take effect immediately.

“There are things that … could be done with a supermajority, some things that require a simple majority,” Pritzker said. “Again, the Legislature is working on all of these things.”

Democrats hold majorities of 73 to 45 in the House and 41 to 18 in the Senate, but have not always been united in measures to increase access to abortion. When Democrats voted last year to repeal the state’s parental notification law, for example, the measure wiped out every chamber with just two votes to spare.

Welch has called on nine House Democrats to work with advocates on legislative proposals, but those negotiations are taking place behind closed doors. State Representative Kelly Cassidy of Chicago, a staunch abortion rights supporter who has been tasked with leading the group, did not respond to a request Tuesday to comment on its progress.

Senate Democrats haven’t announced an official negotiating team, but Harmon spokesman John Patterson said, “There are internal discussions going on.”

Pritzker spoke to reporters on Tuesday after meeting privately with the heads of the Illinois and St. Louis regional chapters of Planned Parenthood, as well as Alexis McGill Johnson, president and CEO of the Planned Parenthood Federation. of America.

Planned Parenthood leaders all praised Pritzker for his support for abortion access and argued for the importance of the Nov. 8 election in determining the future of reproductive health care in Illinois and across the country. all the countries.

“Everyone needs to understand that abortion is on the ballot in November,” said Jennifer Welch, who leads the group’s Illinois chapter.

Pritzker’s opponent, Republican Senator Darren Bailey of Xenia, opposes abortion except when the mother’s life is in danger.

While former Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner signed legislation in 2017 repealing the state’s so-called Trigger Act, which would have banned abortion when Roe was overturned, and Pritzker in 2019 signed another measure enshrining Access to process as a “fundamental right” in state law, advocates say there is still more to do. This is especially true as more states, such as neighboring Missouri and Indiana, impose new restrictions or bans on abortion services, sending thousands more patients to Illinois.

Although they presented a unified front on Tuesday, the defenders exerted some pressure on Pritzker and the Democratic-controlled legislature to act.

In a press release two weeks ago, Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri said Illinois “falls behind other reproductive health-friendly states” in not allowing nurses practitioners and other health workers qualified to perform abortions.

“Illinois has yet to take meaningful steps like this that can address key post-Roe capacity challenges, especially for downstate providers,” the group said.

Pritzker and other leaders have indicated support for such a change, but say it must be done through legislation rather than executive order or administrative rule.

Advocates also called on the state to help pay for travel and other logistical supports for patients who come to Illinois for abortions.

But at Tuesday’s event, Yamelsie Rodríguez, who leads the St. Louis area affiliate, said that in crafting legislative solutions to these issues “it’s really, really important to us that we use this language correctly”.

“It is more important to do it right than to do it quickly, because we are the suppliers who will have to live with the decisions and the laws in the future,” Rodríguez said.

Pritzker, a billionaire heir to the Hyatt hotel fortune, has frequently contributed to abortion rights causes over the years. He made two contributions totaling $1 million to Planned Parenthood’s federal super PAC in 2016 and gave $12,000 to the group’s Illinois PAC in January after donating $2,500 to that group during its first campaign. for the governorship in 2018.

dpetrella@chicagotribune.com

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Founded at UNC, Alpha Pi Omega – the nation’s oldest Native sorority – turns 28 https://scbwicanada.org/founded-at-unc-alpha-pi-omega-the-nations-oldest-native-sorority-turns-28/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 22:08:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/founded-at-unc-alpha-pi-omega-the-nations-oldest-native-sorority-turns-28/ The nation’s oldest Indigenous sorority — Alpha Pi Omega (APiO) — turns 28 on Sept. 1 in remembrance of Founder’s Day. The sorority founded its first chapter, UNC Alpha Chapter, in 1994, and now represents more than 130 tribes over the years and has 24 nationally chartered chapters. APiO was founded by four women representing […]]]>

The nation’s oldest Indigenous sorority — Alpha Pi Omega (APiO) — turns 28 on Sept. 1 in remembrance of Founder’s Day. The sorority founded its first chapter, UNC Alpha Chapter, in 1994, and now represents more than 130 tribes over the years and has 24 nationally chartered chapters.

APiO was founded by four women representing the Lumbee and Coharie tribes, known to the organization as the Four Winds: Jamie Goins, Shannon Brayboy, Christina Strickland and Amy Locklear.

Hayley Jacobs, senior and current UNC chapter president, said APiO’s mission is to support Indigenous women through college and life.

“Having an Indigenous sorority on campus is so important because we are the minority of the minority,” Jacobs said in an emailed statement. “Sometimes that means we may need a little more support.”

Mikayah Locklear, the organization’s vice president, treasurer and historian, said her favorite memory is the night she officially became a member of APiO, a group she says has become part of her identity.

Jacobs said her involvement with the sorority does not end after graduation, as she plans to join one of APiO’s regional professional chapters.

“We want to make sure these girls still feel included in the events in the years to come – not just when they’re at university, because our goal is to support them throughout their lives and not just in college. ‘university,” Jacobs said.

The sorority’s motto is “My sister as myself”, and APiO has expanded its chapters to other institutions such as Oklahoma State University.

Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton, who attended OSU and is APiO’s top public relations director, said she’s held the position since 2006, and it meant the world to her when there were other women. who could sympathize with his experiences.

The National Student Clearinghouse, which publishes reports on student pathways and enrollment trends, reported a 21.8% decrease in the number of Native American students who enrolled in public four-year institutions in 2020.

“Having a culturally sensitive community, like Alpha Pi Omega, in place on campus helps create a sense of belonging, fostering an additional bond and an additional reason for an Indigenous student to push for a way to stay if the going gets tough,” Krehbiel-Burton said in an email.

Since APiO’s founding at UNC in 1994, the sorority has established 14 undergraduate chapters and 10 professional chapters across the country.

Locklear said that since joining the sorority as part of the “Volunteer Beams of Balance” – the official name of the group of women who joined the sorority in the spring of 2022 – it has given her comfort, strength, knowledge and more. skills.

“Last summer I was able to attend our Great Gathering in Minnesota and be surrounded by so many sisters who have gone before me,” she said. “Being at that time and doing business was an honor and an opportunity to develop skills for that context.”

Victoria Chavis, a UNC alumnus and current APiO student organization advisor, said she helps with planning the organization’s events, checking grades and making room reservations.

“I really appreciate that the sorority’s mission is to create support and be support for Native American women in higher education,” Chavis said. “As a sister, when I came back to work here – I started working here again in 2017 – it felt natural to me.”

Locklear shared that sentiment and said she finally felt at home once she joined the sorority.

“Being on a PWI can be extremely difficult and trying to find your place where you feel at home. It was even harder for me coming from a rural and tribal community,” she said.

UNC’s Alpha Chapter was named APiO’s 2022 Undergraduate Chapter of the Year.

Alpha Pi Omega will soon be posting notices for their Semester Interest Meetings on HeelLife and Instagram for students interested in joining the organization.

university@dailytarheel.com | elevate@dailytarheel.com

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