long term – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 10:26:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://scbwicanada.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-125x125.png long term – Scbwi Canada http://scbwicanada.org/ 32 32 Why should masking, physical distancing, hand washing continue in the post-Covid world? https://scbwicanada.org/why-should-masking-physical-distancing-hand-washing-continue-in-the-post-covid-world/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 09:07:54 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/why-should-masking-physical-distancing-hand-washing-continue-in-the-post-covid-world/ These effects are a valuable research finding of the pandemic. It’s a finding that suggests the selective, non-compulsory use of public health measures such as masking, physical distancing and hand washing could play an ongoing role as we enter the endemic phase of COVID-19. . Collectively, these measures are known as non-pharmacological public health interventions […]]]>

These effects are a valuable research finding of the pandemic. It’s a finding that suggests the selective, non-compulsory use of public health measures such as masking, physical distancing and hand washing could play an ongoing role as we enter the endemic phase of COVID-19. . Collectively, these measures are known as non-pharmacological public health interventions (NPIs).

After the onset of the pandemic in March 2020, many parts of the world reported a dramatic decrease in demand for acute healthcare services, including urgent care visits to emergency departments and hospital stays. At first, this was likely due to strict lockdown measures, patients avoiding healthcare facilities for fear of contracting COVID-19, or the perception that hospitals were overwhelmed and unable to accommodate non-emergency cases.

However, as public health measures were eased in the following months, there was a rapid rebound in health care services for conditions such as heart disease and appendicitis. Meanwhile, the decline persists for respiratory illnesses attributed to non-COVID-19 viruses.

In Canada, the usual annual surge of influenza infections has not occurred in the two winters since the start of the pandemic.

Our research group – all front-line healthcare workers – analyzed admission data nationwide. Our analysis revealed that hospital admissions for major respiratory illnesses fell sharply in the year after the first lockdown began.

Specifically, flare-ups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a serious lung disease linked to long-term smoking, and non-COVID-19 community-acquired pneumonia have decreased by nearly 40% in Canada following implementation. of INM such as masking. and physical distancing.

These findings were backed up by another study involving 15,677 patients from nine countries. This study reported a 50% reduction in hospital admissions for COPD after the onset of the pandemic.

This is not entirely surprising as COPD and non-COVID-19 pneumonia are often triggered by cold viruses. If you’re like most Canadians, you haven’t caught a cold in almost two years.

So what’s the deal with a few runny noses and a few colds? Although a viral infection such as a cold or the flu is not likely to significantly harm a healthy person, it can be debilitating and sometimes fatal for someone who is elderly, immunocompromised, or has lung disease. This may require acute care in hospital, or even intensive care in severe cases, and some patients do not survive.

In Canada, acute and chronic respiratory diseases are the third leading cause of death, just behind cancer and heart disease. It also means that virus-related respiratory illnesses place a huge burden on limited healthcare resources.

There have been several periods during the pandemic when our healthcare systems were over capacity, and there were fears that hospitals would need to triage resources and deny intensive care to some critically ill patients.

Fortunately, that did not happen, and it appears the likely reason for this is the significant extra capacity that has become available due to avoided hospitalizations for other respiratory illnesses linked to the virus.

As the pandemic drags on, people are tired of ongoing public health restrictions. With vaccination rates in Canada among the highest in the world and set to increase further with the approval of vaccines for pediatric populations, many are looking forward to the time when NPIs may no longer be needed.

However, before renouncing the measures altogether, it is important to consider whether their demonstrated benefits warrant continued use. The fact that hospitalizations for respiratory illnesses other than COVID-19 have remained low, despite the easing of strict containment measures, suggests that these benefits can be maintained with mask use and practices such as frequent washing. hands.

Even before the pandemic, public masking was common practice in many Asian countries. As is now the norm in Canada as well, the continuation of these practices can have significant merit and offer protection to the most vulnerable demographic groups in our society.

This will certainly be difficult given the opposition of a vocal minority and the lack of awareness among the general public of the benefits of the continued use of NPIs. Currently, most of the available evidence is largely observational, as no randomized trials have yet assessed the effectiveness of NPIs in reducing non-COVID-19 viral respiratory disease at the population level.

Additionally, there is no consensus on which specific NPIs might be most effective in preventing the spread of disease. It is also unclear whether reductions in acute care use have translated into reduced death rates for specific conditions.

These limitations are currently being addressed in a large Alberta study involving more than 500,000 patients. Preliminary results – to be published in the Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society International Conference 2022 – show that NPIs are an effective strategy for preventing both acute care visits and respiratory disease-related mortality.

However, in the meantime, policy makers should consider this compelling evidence and consider whether the continued use of masking and other NPI measures is warranted, particularly for people at high risk of severe disease from viral respiratory infections and those close to them.

Recommendations, policies or, if deemed necessary, terms of reference may be changed in the future as new evidence emerges. Until then, the use of NPIs, even on an interim basis, can reduce the strain on our healthcare system and help protect the most vulnerable members of our society.

By Rutvij A. KhanolkarMedical student, University of Calgary and Eddy S. LangProfessor, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

This story was published from a news feed with no text edits. Only the title has been changed.

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2 years into pandemic, Manitoba suffers 2nd highest COVID-19 death rate in Canada https://scbwicanada.org/2-years-into-pandemic-manitoba-suffers-2nd-highest-covid-19-death-rate-in-canada/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 18:43:33 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/2-years-into-pandemic-manitoba-suffers-2nd-highest-covid-19-death-rate-in-canada/ Gordon Dreilich enjoyed hunting and fishing. He followed the Jets and the Bombers. He played hockey as a youngster, volunteered as a coach and worked as a professional carpenter. The Winnipegger had liver and kidney disease before contracting COVID-19 in late 2020. He ended up in hospital and spent weeks in intensive care but, according […]]]>

Gordon Dreilich enjoyed hunting and fishing. He followed the Jets and the Bombers. He played hockey as a youngster, volunteered as a coach and worked as a professional carpenter.

The Winnipegger had liver and kidney disease before contracting COVID-19 in late 2020. He ended up in hospital and spent weeks in intensive care but, according to his sister, he never recovered. never quite recovered.

Long-term effects of Dreilich included panic attacks and the inability to catch his breath. Four months after his release from the hospital, he returned for a liver transplant and did not survive.

He died in June at the age of 63.

“He went straight to the hospital, and that’s it, we never saw him,” his sister, Charlene Fewings, said.

She considers her brother a victim of COVID-19 even though she still does not know if his death is included in Manitoba’s death toll. official death count attributed to disease.

“I’m not ready to see the reports of what happened. It’s still very fresh,” she said.

“It affects everyone differently, and I think that’s the big deal. You don’t know how bad it’s going to be for you. And just one person’s death that could be prevented…it’s too much .”

Gordon Dreilich was a longtime Winnipeg Blue Bombers fan who lived to see the team win the Gray Cup in 2019. He died in 2021 before the Bombers won again. (Submitted by Charlene Fewings)

Two years ago, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. Since then, as many as 1,710 Manitobans have died from the disease, according to the official provincial tally.

This includes 667 in 2020 alone. Only cancer and heart disease caused more deaths in Manitoba that year, according to Manitoba Vital Statistics.

The province has reported another 725 COVID deaths in 2021 as well as 318 this year so far.

In purely numerical terms, the death of 1,710 people over two years is comparable to the disappearance of the entire population of Roblin, Manitoba.

In relative terms, the death rate from COVID in this province is even greater.

Combination of factors in a high death rate

Two years into the pandemic, Manitoba continues to have the second highest COVID-19 death rate in Canada: 123 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, according to federal data.

Only Quebec has a higher death rate from the disease, with 164 COVID deaths per 100,000 people during the pandemic.

Manitoba Health Minister Audrey Gordon did not respond to requests for comment on Manitoba’s high COVID-19 death rate.

There’s probably no single reason, says Winnipeg epidemiologist Souradet Shaw.

“Instead, it’s likely that a combination of factors contributed to what we see overall,” he said.

Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba’s provincial civil service chief administrator, attributed some of Manitoba’s high COVID-19 death toll to outbreaks that swept through Winnipeg personal care homes during the fall and winter of 2020, when the second wave of the pandemic claimed the lives of hundreds of elderly people.

(Radio-Canada News)

The relatively poor health of Manitobans before the pandemic also played a role, Roussin said.

“One of the thoughts is definitely the underlying health and the underlying determinants,” he said.

These determinants, more formally known as the social determinants of health, include relatively poor access to health services in rural and remote communities in Manitoba, particularly First Nations.

“The overall health of our population is tied to the health of our racialized communities, and in particular our Indigenous population,” Shaw said.

“Unfortunately, in the case of Indigenous peoples in Manitoba, the legacy of colonialism and systemic racism continues to play out and act to systematically create barriers to health and well-being.”

Other social determinants of health include poor housing, as the more people living in a house, the more difficult it is to prevent transmission of COVID-19 within households.

Another determinant is income, as those in lower-paying jobs – especially in the service and food processing sectors – were less able to work from home when community transmission was high.

Another determinant is ethnicity itself, as newcomers to Canada and Indigenous peoples are more likely to earn less money, live with more people, and have less access to health services.

“COVID-19 has served to amplify existing inequalities,” Shaw said. “Those who are already subject to higher rates of illness and death, period, have only seen their risk of death and illness due to COVID-19.”

Vaccination rates also play a role

Low vaccination rates in parts of the southern Manitoba health region also appear to be driving up Manitoba’s COVID-19 death rate, Shaw said.

During the second wave in 2020, which took place before vaccines for the disease were available, the Winnipeg Health Region was overrepresented among the ranks of the COVID dead. With 56% of Manitoba’s population, Winnipeg accounted for 70% of COVID-19 deaths in the province.

(Radio-Canada News)

Yet from mid-April 2021, at the start of the third wave, until the end of last year, the Southern health region stood out. With just 15% of the provincial population, it accounted for about 33% of COVID deaths in Manitoba.

“The biggest factor here, I guess, would be the lower proportion of people vaccinated in Southern Health,” Shaw said.

While the third wave hit Manitoba’s intensive care wards harder than any other wave, the Omicron wave earlier this year proved more deadly. More people have died in this province during this latest wave of the pandemic than at any time since the second wave in 2020.

The main explanation is the massive number of infections of the Omicron variant, whose less severe mortality rate is countered by its more contagious nature.

Dr. Tara Moriarty, an infectious disease researcher in Toronto, estimates there may have been 10 times more Omicron infections in Manitoba than official numbers document.

She previously conducted research that suggests Manitoba underreported its COVID-19 deaths in 2020, based on factors that include studies to determine the prevalence of COVID antibodies in the general population.

“It is clear now that there was a fairly high percentage of probable COVID deaths that were missed,” she said, adding that she expects the undercount to continue until in 2021.

For Charlene Fewings, it doesn’t matter that her brother Gordon is included in the official tally. She is already convinced that COVID-19 weakened him to the point that he did not survive.

“It’s a disease we can control, with vaccines and with common sense,” she said. “We shouldn’t lose people to a virus.”

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COVID-19 may shrink certain regions of the brain: British study https://scbwicanada.org/covid-19-may-shrink-certain-regions-of-the-brain-british-study/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 03:39:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/covid-19-may-shrink-certain-regions-of-the-brain-british-study/ Certain regions of the human brain can shrink after a person has caught COVID-19, according to the first study to use brain scans to show a “before and after” look at the brain after infection. A new British study published Monday in Nature magazine found that there is greater tissue damage and shrinkage in the […]]]>

Certain regions of the human brain can shrink after a person has caught COVID-19, according to the first study to use brain scans to show a “before and after” look at the brain after infection.

A new British study published Monday in Nature magazine found that there is greater tissue damage and shrinkage in the brains of those who had even mild cases of COVID-19, with most of the changes related to areas of the brain related to smell.

It’s not yet clear whether these effects are permanent or will improve over time, or what they might mean for overall brain health or function, with the researchers noting that some brain loss occurs with age.

In an attempt to gauge the impact of COVID-19, the researchers looked at brain changes in 785 people aged 51 to 81 who had undergone two brain scans and the accompanying cognitive tests.

The key piece of data is that 401 participants contracted COVID-19 after their first scan and before their second scan, which helped to see if imaging would show greater changes in the brains of these participants.

Compared to those who had not contracted COVID-19, brain scans of participants who had contracted the virus showed greater reduction in gray matter in the brain, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex and parahippocampal gyrus, which are associated with smell.

The orbitofrontal cortex is also linked to decision-making processes and emotional and social behavior, while the left parahippocampal gyrus is described in the study as “a limbic region of the brain that plays a crucial and integrative role for the temporal order relative of events”. in episodic memory.

Among participants who had contracted COVID-19, brain changes ranged from 0.2% to 2% more changes than those without prior COVID-19 infection.

The data comes from UK Biobank, a research resource that regularly collects health data from 500,000 ongoing participants to pursue numerous research projects.

Between January 2021 and February 2022, the project asked participants who had received imaging exams before the pandemic to return for more imaging to help track the long-term effect of the virus on internal organs.

It was this move that made it possible to trace the participants who had received scanners before and during the pandemic.

Previous research has shown that COVID-19 can affect the brain, with many researchers pointing out that common symptoms such as loss of taste or smell have neurological impacts. But many studies looking at brain damage in COVID-19 cases have focused on those who had severe cases of the virus that required hospitalization.

In this study, only 15 of the 401 cases were severe cases of COVID-19 requiring hospitalization.

“Using the UK Biobank resource, we were in a unique position to examine the changes that occurred in the brain following mild – as opposed to more moderate or severe – infection with SARS-CoV-2” , Gwenaelle Douaud, professor at the University of Oxford and lead author of the study, said in a statement.

“Although the infection was mild for 96% of our participants, we found greater loss of gray matter volume and greater tissue damage in infected participants, on average 4.5 months after infection. They also showed a greater decrease in their mental abilities to perform complex tasks, and this mental worsening was partly linked to these brain abnormalities. All of these negative effects were more marked at older ages. A key question for future brain imaging studies is to see if this brain tissue damage resolves in the longer term.

In this study, the researchers matched the 401 cases with 384 participants who had received both scans but had not contracted COVID-19, to serve as a control group with similar demographic characteristics.

All of the participants who contracted COVID-19 in the research cohort did so between March 2020 and April 2021, a time when many variants, but not Omicron, were active.

The first and second scans were spaced about three years apart on average, and the second scan took place as early as a month after COVID-19 infection for some participants, and as late as six months after for others.

The researchers found no significant difference in the results of the second analyzes based on the time elapsed after the participant contracted COVID-19.

The majority of tissue damage and changes in gray matter thickness were linked to regions of the brain that deal at least in part with the olfactory system, but the researchers said the impacts could extend beyond these. regions.

“While the greatest atrophy of SARS-CoV-2 positive participants was localized to a few regions, mainly limbic, the increase in [cerebrospinal fluid] whole-brain volume and decrease in volume suggests an additional diffuse loss of gray matter superimposed on the more regional effects seen in areas related to olfaction,” the study states.

Those who were infected but had mostly mild symptoms in the study cohort showed no signs of impaired memory, but showed worsening executive function, which was revealed across six cognitive tasks that the participants had to do.

When participants took a common test linking numbers that is sometimes used as a screening tool for dementia, called the Trail Making Test, those who had been infected with COVID-19 took “significantly” longer to complete the test, according to the study.

“Significantly greater cognitive decline, which persisted even after the exclusion of hospitalized patients, was observed in the SARS-CoV-2 positive group between the two time points, and this decline was associated with greater atrophy of crus II, a cognitive lobule of the cerebellum,” the study said, referring to a subsection of the cerebellum, a part at the back of the brain that coordinates physical movement.

Although these impacts on the brain may seem frightening, the study noted that the structural changes were “modest”, saying that if there was an “additional loss in infected participants of an average of 0.7% in the regions olfaction-related brain damage”, this should be analyzed knowing that we know that brain loss also occurs naturally, with older people who live alone experiencing a loss of hippocampal volume of 0.3% per year.

However, being able to measure whether the virus is associated with additional changes in the brain that might not have been observed otherwise is extremely valuable for further research and potentially therapeutic solutions.

It could also potentially shed light on the lingering symptoms that plague those with long COVID, including persistent brain fog and fatigue, though more research is needed.

Stephen Smith, a professor at the University of Oxford and lead author of the study, said in the press release that being able to look at scans of the same person taken before contracting COVID-19 gave them a unique chance to assess with greater certainty. the impact of the virus.

“The fact that we have the pre-infection scan helps us distinguish infection-related brain changes from differences that may have pre-existed in their brains,” Smith said.

“The UK Biobank COVID-19 Repeat Imaging study is the only study in the world able to demonstrate ‘before vs after’ changes in the brain associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection”, Professor and Scientist Naomi Allen chief at UK Biobank, added in the statement.

“Collecting a second set of multi-organ imaging scans from some people who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2 and others who had not been infected generated a unique resource to enable scientists to understand how the virus affects internal organs.”

Although the researchers have made efforts to investigate potentially confounding causes, including assessing whether the flu that occurred between the first and second scans was associated with brain findings, they also acknowledge that since it s This is an observational study, they cannot say with complete certainty that the brain changes were caused solely by COVID-19.

“Our statistics also represent an average effect; not all infected participants will show longitudinal brain abnormalities,” the study states.

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Hardship Loans from Banks and Credit Unions https://scbwicanada.org/hardship-loans-from-banks-and-credit-unions/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 14:16:04 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/?p=3882 Hardship Loans from Banks and Credit UnionsAre you on benefits and looking for a payday loan? This article talks about the best payday loans that are available to people who receive benefits. The majority of banks and credit unions are offering hardship loans because of the Covid-19 Pandemic. These loans were designed to give people alternatives to help if they’re facing loss of […]]]> Hardship Loans from Banks and Credit Unions

Are you on benefits and looking for a payday loan? This article talks about the best payday loans that are available to people who receive benefits. The majority of banks and credit unions are offering hardship loans because of the Covid-19 Pandemic. These loans were designed to give people alternatives to help if they’re facing loss of employment due because of the health crises.

As compared to traditional credit, American Bankers Association offers relief options for short-term needs but with smaller amounts and with better terms.

Every financial institution comes up with its own rules that you can find out about them by visiting their website or by calling them. Certain loans come with no interest, with little or no fees, and in some instances the option of deferred payments.

The range of loans we’ve seen is $1,000 to $5000, so check out the websites of banks in your area , or contact them to find out what they can help you.

So, What is A Loan for Hardship?

You might be wondering what a hardship loan actually is and how it can be applied to your particular situation. They are a type of installment loans created for borrowers who require money to cover the financial burden of being fired from their position. These loans are becoming more prevalent due to the spread of the pandemic.

A lot of banks, credit unions as well as online lenders offer short-term loan options that aid all sorts of people to get through a difficult budget until the time they are able to collect unemployment benefits or work.

They are not the same as the credit cards that are Revolving Line of Credit. It is the cash in a lump you receive in advance. The interest rates are typically lower, and the payments may be delayed. Make sure to repay the loan in accordance with its conditions, to ensure that you don’t pay any additional charges or fees.

How Do I Get a Hardship loan?

Each lender has their specific set of guidelines and procedures for requesting the loan. The process isn’t overly complex; you’ll probably discover it to be simple.

You will likely have to fill out an online application first. In the next step, you may need to fill in personal information like your address as well as your name, name, monthly mortgage/rent payments or SSN.

It is also possible to discuss briefly the financial strain you’re facing and the funds will be used to.

You’re likely to get approved the next day and will receive your loans within just 24 hours. The money will be transferred to your account at the bank in the majority of cases, but some lenders might write checks.

After that, you’ll repay it each month until it’s paid entirely.

Who is eligible for a Personal Loans with Hardship?

Since Covid-19 and similar hardships are fairly commonplace These kinds of loans are fairly easy to be eligible for. Additionally, the majority of them have loose criteria, and as that long as you’re capable of showing them the extent to which you’re suffering from the burdens caused by the epidemic, your chances of getting approved are high.

If you choose to apply for an emergency loan to cover the emergency situation you’ve caught up in the situation, you are assured that the lender will conduct an investigation into your credit history. The lender will also be to request documents that show the loan is able to be paid back.

Remember that many lenders offer hardship loans that are tied to Covid-19. Therefore, look around to see the options available. In this way, you can discover a lender who is willing to provide you with a repayment time and plan to ensure that you are able to comfortably repay the loan. Repayment terms differ based on the circumstances.

What is the amount of these loans?

Are you curious about the amount you could borrow? It’s crucial to realize that these loans aren’t meant for use over the long term. They can be found in an amount of $1000-$5000 and you shouldn’t be making use of these loans to pay for huge costs like tuition or for major home improvement.

Use this type of loan when you’re confronted with a temporary issue and you’re confident that you’ll be able to repay the loan in near time. For example, you might have lost your job however, you were able to locate a new one immediately. However, since pay-for-training doesn’t start at the beginning of the week following, and the paychecks for the new job are biweekly and you’re in need of money now.

If you are in need of a larger amount in cash, it may be worth taking out an ordinary personal loan.

Many lenders are capable giving you up to 10K (and occasionally even more). But what exactly are you’re financing? Are you financing EVERYTHING? If this is the case then it might be time to cut back on your spending or increase your income.

The cost of borrowing money that you aren’t able to repay or that you must pay back result in a perpetual cycle of borrowing or debt that can be very difficult to break out of.

If you think you’re suffering from an issue with borrowing or spending and need to talk to financial institutions regarding what to do.

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Key numbers of COVID-19 in the Ottawa region today https://scbwicanada.org/key-numbers-of-covid-19-in-the-ottawa-region-today/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 18:59:54 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/key-numbers-of-covid-19-in-the-ottawa-region-today/ Ottawa has no active local COVID-19 patients in a hospital intensive care unit. The city’s sewage signal has plateaued. Sixty per cent of Ottawa residents aged 12 and older are receiving a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Today’s Ottawa Update There are 11 Ottawa residents in local hospitals who are being treated for COVID-19, […]]]>
  • Ottawa has no active local COVID-19 patients in a hospital intensive care unit.
  • The city’s sewage signal has plateaued.
  • Sixty per cent of Ottawa residents aged 12 and older are receiving a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Today’s Ottawa Update

There are 11 Ottawa residents in local hospitals who are being treated for COVID-19, according to Wednesday’s update from Ottawa Public Health (OPH). This number has been between 10 and 20 for the past 10 days.

For the first time since late December, none of the patients are being treated in an intensive care unit.

The hospital figures do not include people who came to the hospital for other reasons and later tested positive for COVID-19. They also do not cover people with persistent COVID-19 problems or patients transferred from other health units.

OPH shares these numbers a few times a week. They have dropped significantly this week.

Ottawa Public Health has a count of COVID-19 hospitals that shows all hospitalized patients who test positive for COVID, including those admitted for other reasons. They were February 16 to 28. (Ottawa Public Health)

the average level of coronavirus in Ottawa’s sewage is now stable, with potential signs of a slight increase. This is about three times higher than before the wave of the Omicron variant.

Researchers measuring levels of the new coronavirus in Ottawa’s sewage found they were slowly declining, with a recent slight increase using data through Feb. 27. (613covid.ca)

As Omicron overwhelms and limits testing, the true number of cases in Ottawa is higher only the confirmed number and some familiar numbers are affected.

Ottawa’s medical officer of health said Monday that residents should continue to assess the risks to their personal circumstances as Ontario removes its capacity and collection limits and proof of vaccination requirements.

The average positivity rate for those who received PCR tests outside long-term care homes remains around 11%, while the average rate inside homes remains around 5%.

On Wednesday, OPH reported 127 more cases of COVID-19 and no more deaths.

The seven-day rolling average of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases expressed per 100,000 population is around 80.

Vaccines

913 317: The number of Ottawa residents aged five and older with at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, up about 200 from Monday. This represents 92% of the eligible population.

872 464: The number of Ottawa residents aged five and older with a second dose, about 200 more than Monday. Eighty-eight percent of the eligible population now receives at least two doses.

37,712: The number of children in Ottawa aged 5 to 11 who received their second dose, about 150 more than Monday and 48% of that age group. Progress from the first dose stagnated at approximately 70%.

550 203: The number of Ottawans aged 12 and older with a third dose, about 3,000 more than Monday. It covers 60%. 100 of these residents; younger children are only eligible for third doses if they have certain health problems.

In the whole region

Outside of Ottawa, the greater region has approximately 50 COVID-19-related hospitalizations and 15 of those patients require intensive care. These numbers are slowly decreasing and do not include Hastings Prince Edward Public Health (HPE).

This region remains stable with 25 local hospitalizations.

Five local COVID patients remain in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark (LGL) counties since their update on Wednesday. It’s been stable for over two weeks.

Wastewater levels are stable at sites in the Kingston area, and stable or decreasing in LGL, each with data through February 28. Of the three sites east of Ottawa, only Casselman saw levels increase with data through February 23.

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Global Epidural Flat Filters Market 2021 Top Segments Like Key Regions, Applications and Key Players 2027 – B. Braun, Epimed, Smiths Medical Inc, Vygon SA https://scbwicanada.org/global-epidural-flat-filters-market-2021-top-segments-like-key-regions-applications-and-key-players-2027-b-braun-epimed-smiths-medical-inc-vygon-sa/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 02:31:30 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/global-epidural-flat-filters-market-2021-top-segments-like-key-regions-applications-and-key-players-2027-b-braun-epimed-smiths-medical-inc-vygon-sa/ Global flat epidural filters market from 2021 to 2027 is the title of professional market research by MarketQuest.biz to assess potential market growth opportunities. The main objective of the study is to provide basic information about industry competitors, current market trends, market potential, growth rate and other relevant data. The study examines the global flat […]]]>

Global flat epidural filters market from 2021 to 2027 is the title of professional market research by MarketQuest.biz to assess potential market growth opportunities. The main objective of the study is to provide basic information about industry competitors, current market trends, market potential, growth rate and other relevant data.

The study examines the global flat epidural filters market in both its current state and its future potential. Separate chapters on regional studies and annual growth estimates for the survey period from 2021 to 2027 are provided to help readers better grasp the future prospects of the markets. The study combines a number of analytical approaches such as SWOT, Porter’s five forces and gaining insight into the intensity of competition, the risk of substitutes and new entrants, as well as strengths, weaknesses, business challenges and opportunities.

DOWNLOAD FREE SAMPLE REPORT: https://www.marketquest.biz/sample-request/45505

The research examines the major barriers for market expansion along with the long-term growth potential of the global Epidural Flat Filters industry. Expansion strategies and methods, growth projections, manufacturing methodologies, and cost structures are all explained in this report.

The search actually covers the following product categories:

  • Disposable
  • Use within specified time

According to the research report, the following manufacturers were discovered.

  • B. Braun
  • Epimed
  • Smiths Medical Inc
  • Vygon AG
  • Vogt Medical
  • Zhejiang Runqiang Medical Instruments Co Ltd

Geographically, this study covers a number of key regions:

  • North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
  • Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia, Italy and Rest of Europe)
  • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia and Australia)
  • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and rest of South America)
  • Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, South Africa and Rest of Middle East and Africa)

The main applications of the study are presented below:

ACCESS FULL REPORT: https://www.marketquest.biz/report/45505/global-epidural-flat-filter-market-2021-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2026

Global growth trends, industry growth prospects, and competitive assessments are all analyzed in depth. Porter’s Five Forces SWOT analysis is used to further assess the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the global Flat Epidural Filter market. Current market trends, development potential, regional assessments, strategic concepts and developing segments in the Flat Epidural Filter are all examined in this report.

Report customization:

This report can be customized to meet customer requirements. Please contact our sales team (sales@marketquest.biz), who will ensure that you get a report tailored to your needs. You can also get in touch with our executives at +1-201-465-4211 to share your research needs.

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Need help during the coronavirus crisis? Emergency Loans Available – Here’s Where You Can Get One https://scbwicanada.org/need-help-during-the-coronavirus-crisis-emergency-loans-available-heres-where-you-can-get-one/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 02:53:01 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/need-help-during-the-coronavirus-crisis-emergency-loans-available-heres-where-you-can-get-one/ Need help during the coronavirus crisis? Emergency Loans Available – Here’s Where You Can Get One In these uncertain times, emergency loans can be a vital resource. If you’re struggling to make ends meet due to the coronavirus pandemic, here’s where you can find help. There are many payday loan companies offering online loans during […]]]>

Need help during the coronavirus crisis? Emergency Loans Available – Here’s Where You Can Get One

In these uncertain times, emergency loans can be a vital resource. If you’re struggling to make ends meet due to the coronavirus pandemic, here’s where you can find help. There are many payday loan companies offering online loans during this crisis. So, if you need money fast, there is no need to panic. Just search for “payday loans online” and you will find many lenders ready to help you.

What are emergency loans and what do they offer borrowers during the coronavirus pandemic?

Emergency loans are short-term loans that can provide a quick injection of cash during a financial emergency. They are usually unsecured, which means you don’t need to post collateral to get the loan. This makes it a great option for people who may not have access to other forms of credit.

Emergency loans can help pay for unexpected expenses such as medical bills or food shortages. They can also help cover your rent or mortgage payments if you cannot work due to the pandemic.

This type of loan can be a lifesaver in these tough times, but it comes with high interest rates, so it’s important to shop around for the best deal. Be sure to read the terms and conditions carefully before signing up for an emergency loan.

If you’re struggling to make ends meet because of the coronavirus pandemic, here’s where you can find help. There are many payday loan companies offering online loans during this crisis. So, if you need money fast, there is no need to panic. Just search for “payday loans online” and you will find many lenders ready to help you.

The pros and cons of taking out a national emergency loan.

Emergency loans can be a great way to get the money you need during a crisis. They offer borrowers a quick and easy way to access cash, without having to worry about applying for a traditional loan. BridgePayday’s Usman Konst, with over 2 decades of online lending experience, says “emergency loans also come with high interest rates, so it’s important to look for the best deal.”

Emergency loans can provide borrowers with a quick and easy way to get the money they need in a financial emergency. Emergency loans are also unsecured, meaning you don’t need to provide collateral to get the loan. This makes it a great option for people who may not have access to other forms of credit.

However, emergency loans are not designed as a long-term solution to your financial problems. They should only be used as a last resort, when you cannot get the money any other way. So, if you are considering applying, make sure you meet all the eligibility requirements and that you can afford to repay the loan in full and on time.

How do I apply for an emergency loan online or in person?

Not everyone will qualify for an emergency loan. You will need to meet certain eligibility requirements, which vary from lender to lender. Generally, you will need to be a US citizen or resident, have a job and a bank account, and meet the minimum age requirement.

emergency loans can be applied for online or in person. If you apply online, most lenders will ask you to provide basic information such as your name, address, and social security number. You will also need to provide employment information and bank details.

emergency loans can also be applied for in person at a local payday loan store. If you apply online, most lenders will ask you to provide basic information such as your name, address, and social security number.

How to repay your emergency loan?

emergency loans are meant to be repaid as quickly as possible. The repayment process varies by lender, but most emergency loans must be repaid within a few weeks or months. Emergency loan companies also charge high interest rates and fees, so it’s important to look for the best deal. Emergency loans can help during a coronavirus crisis – emergency loans can be repaid in weeks or months. Emergency loan companies also charge high interest rates and fees, so it’s important to look for the best deal.

To learn more about emergency loans and payday loans, see our site here https://bridgepayday.com/. We would be happy to answer all your questions!

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Testing surges as COVID case soars in Two Rivers District | Local News https://scbwicanada.org/testing-surges-as-covid-case-soars-in-two-rivers-district-local-news/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/testing-surges-as-covid-case-soars-in-two-rivers-district-local-news/ However, she added, “We understand our adversary (COVID) better than at the beginning.” Currently, 38 adult patients are hospitalized with COVID in the Two Rivers area, which includes Buffalo, Dawson, Franklin, Gosper, Harlan, Kearney and Phelps counties. Five patients are on ventilators. No children were hospitalized with COVID Friday morning, according to Susan Puckett, the […]]]>

However, she added, “We understand our adversary (COVID) better than at the beginning.”

Currently, 38 adult patients are hospitalized with COVID in the Two Rivers area, which includes Buffalo, Dawson, Franklin, Gosper, Harlan, Kearney and Phelps counties. Five patients are on ventilators. No children were hospitalized with COVID Friday morning, according to Susan Puckett, the Two Rivers community health nurse.

subtitle in the story State Pilot Program

Two Rivers also introduced the Infection Control and Assessment Promotion Program, a seven-year-old state initiative that is part of Nebraska Medicine, supported by the state Department of Health and Human Services. and supported by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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ICAP has launched a new pilot program that aims to prevent infections of all kinds – not just COVID-19 – in schools, health centers, long-term care facilities, dental and nursing facilities. other establishments.

It offers free assessments of infection control practices such as hand washing, respiratory infection control, and environmental cleaning at these facilities. It also offers training programs for school nurses, secretaries, staff members and others. For more information, visit nebraskaICAP@nebraskamed.com.

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Iron ore recovery triggers surge in housing demand in Lab West, with some residents feeling the pinch https://scbwicanada.org/iron-ore-recovery-triggers-surge-in-housing-demand-in-lab-west-with-some-residents-feeling-the-pinch/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 18:33:04 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/iron-ore-recovery-triggers-surge-in-housing-demand-in-lab-west-with-some-residents-feeling-the-pinch/ Jay Torraville from Labrador City lives with another family because she can’t afford a place of her own. (Submitted by Jay Torraville) With the boom in iron ore mining in western Labrador, the area’s housing stock is struggling to meet the growing demand of an influx of workers, sending rents skyrocketing and leaving some residents […]]]>

Jay Torraville from Labrador City lives with another family because she can’t afford a place of her own. (Submitted by Jay Torraville)

With the boom in iron ore mining in western Labrador, the area’s housing stock is struggling to meet the growing demand of an influx of workers, sending rents skyrocketing and leaving some residents behind them.

Jay Torraville, a service worker in Labrador City, is struggling to make ends meet.

“Prices are going up for everything, for food, rent, gas, just to live on,” Torraville told CBC News.

Torraville said they can survive because they live in a room in another family’s house, keeping their housing costs low but sacrificing having their own place.

They consider themselves lucky to live with a family they love, but say their situation is not sustainable in the long term.

The two main mining towns in Labrador West are Wabush and Labrador City. (Radio Canada)

Nancy Bonnell Stoyles of Labrador City has experienced first-hand the housing volatility in the area, having been forced to move twice when her rent doubled since 2008.

She and her family finally managed to buy a house in 2018 for $25,000 near the end of a previous boom, and the most recent appraisal put its value at $144,000, according to Stoyles, who attributed it to the boom and bust cycle.

“It goes around a cycle. It goes around in circles and eventually this boom is going to end in a few years,” Stoyles said.

The deputy mayor of Labrador City said the town is addressing the housing shortage and has donated land to Labrador West Pioneer Living, a local business that plans to build cottages for the elderly.

“In the big turn of things, it’s going to get about 40 houses.” said Mitchell Marsh.

Although the homes are for seniors, Marsh said, they will still open up the wider market as seniors move in, making their old homes available for others to rent or buy. But the city can’t say when the project will be finished.

Nancy Bonnell Stoyles of Labrador City, pictured with her family, has experienced firsthand the housing volatility in the area. (Submitted by Nancy Bonnell Stoyles)

NDP MP for Labrador West Jordan Brown says the government needs to do more to fill the gaps.

“We need affordable rental housing, with a more mixed housing style,” said Brown, who said a combination of rent control and low-cost housing development would help ease the current housing crisis.

But the provincial government says rent control is not working.

In a statement to CBC, a spokesperson said: “The disadvantages of increased administrative burden and potential unintended consequences outweigh the potential benefits.”

Arn Keeling, left, and John Sandlos are co-authors of Mining Country: A History of Canada’s Mines and Miners. (Submitted by Arn Keeling and John Sandlos)

Boom and bust cycle

The Lab West boom was driven by a surge in demand for iron ore as global manufacturing recovers from a pandemic crash. The price of iron ore has fallen to pre-pandemic levels, but demand has remained, fueling Lab West’s economy. The co-authors of A Canadian Mining History argue that major natural resource developments can overheat an economy built around a resource.

“This can lead to things like rapid development or even housing issues,” said Arn Keeling, co-author of Mining Country: A History of Canada’s Mines and Miners

“It’s almost like a community is thriving and growing so much that the social infrastructure can’t keep up,” said co-author John Sandlos.

When housing supply lags economic recovery, people whose incomes are not linked to the boom cannot afford the higher prices. But when cheaper housing is readily available as the economy cools, people often struggle to find jobs, nor can they necessarily afford lower prices.

Learn more about CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

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Ontario LTCs worried about approaching recall warrant deadline amid Omicron surge https://scbwicanada.org/ontario-ltcs-worried-about-approaching-recall-warrant-deadline-amid-omicron-surge/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 17:44:25 +0000 https://scbwicanada.org/ontario-ltcs-worried-about-approaching-recall-warrant-deadline-amid-omicron-surge/ Most long-term care workers in Ontario have just under two weeks to receive their third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, but unions and industry groups say it takes longer to reach the government’s target as staff infections hit record levels and workers struggle to get to appointments. The government has imposed booster doses on workers […]]]>

Most long-term care workers in Ontario have just under two weeks to receive their third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, but unions and industry groups say it takes longer to reach the government’s target as staff infections hit record levels and workers struggle to get to appointments.

The government has imposed booster doses on workers in the sector, citing the heightened risk to vulnerable residents living in homes that saw thousands of deaths and outbreaks earlier in the pandemic.

Workers, volunteers and students have until January 28 to get their third shot and stay on the job, if enough time has passed since their second dose. People who became eligible for boosters after January 1 have until March 14 to get a third shot, and those who have recently been infected with COVID-19 will also have more time to get vaccinated.

The Ministry of Long-Term Care says the majority of staff are currently eligible for a third dose. As of January 12, nearly 64% of those people had already received a third dose, a spokesperson said on Friday, adding that “the expectation remains that eligible staff will receive a third dose by January 28.”

But with the Omicron variant driving outbreaks, worker absences and staff infections to record numbers, those inside say the target – while important for protecting residents – will be nearly impossible to hit in time. throughout the sector.

“We should aim to do it on the 28th, but understanding the circumstances of each of these homes,” said Sharleen Stewart, president of SEIU Healthcare, a union representing long-term care workers in the province. “It really depends on individual houses and circumstances at the moment.”

She said it would make sense to extend the approaching deadline on a case-by-case basis, especially as workers grapple with intense workloads due to staffing shortages, which predate the pandemic but which worsened during the Omicron wave.

“Right now, everything in the lives of these frontline workers is a challenge,” she said.

Home-run clinics would help get more people vaccinated faster, Stewart said — something that happens in some places, but not across the province. It has also become difficult for people to make appointments outside of work, now that all adults in the province are eligible for callbacks and clinics prioritizing education workers and children before schools reopen. schools on Monday.

Sharleen Stewart, president of SEIU Healthcare, a union representing the province’s long-term care workers, said: ‘Right now, everything in the lives of these frontline workers is a challenge. (Provided)

Lisa Levin, CEO of AdvantAge Ontario, which represents municipal and not-for-profit long-term care homes, said there have been “quite a few hurdles” in meeting the Jan. 28 deadline for booster shots.

“A lot of homes won’t be able to respond to it and hopefully the department can delay it,” Levin said in an interview on Friday.

Hesitation is also a problem, she noted, with some people unwilling to mix vaccine types, and others being blindsided by the new requirement to get three doses that was announced in late December, a few weeks after the mandatory two-dose rule comes into effect.

“People who hesitate, it’s a tough decision for them, and they’ve had to potentially do it once, then twice, then they have to do it a third time,” she said. “Eventually some of them just say forget about it.”

She also noted that because Ontario hasn’t made vaccines mandatory for any other sector, some people may choose to go work elsewhere in the healthcare system rather than meet the third dose deadline.

Looming deadline is tough, says union president

The president of the Ontario Council of Hospital Unions, an arm of the public sector employees union, said he also thinks the looming deadline will be difficult to meet given the current pandemic situation.

“Pulling back the deadline, I think, would make a lot of sense,” said Michael Hurley.

He said the stress experienced by workers over the past two years should also be taken into consideration with less rigid deadlines and on-site access to vaccines.

Hurley also pointed to the need for more guaranteed sick days so people can take time off if they have side effects.

The Ontario Long-Term Care Association also acknowledged that “there may be challenges” for all staff to meet the January 28 deadline, as so many workers have been infected and others cannot access timely appointments in their regions.

CEO Donna Duncan said homes and health system partners were working on “regional solutions” to improve access to third doses, including some hospitals inviting long-term care staff to their on-site clinics.

Doctor says deadline important to protect residents

Dr. Peter Juni, research director for the Ontario Science Advisory Table on COVID-19, said that while the situation is difficult, the lead time is important so that residents are protected while Omicron is at its most widespread and most dangerous.

“It’s not something we would need three months from now. It’s really in the middle of this crisis,” he said.

A Friday memo to operators from the Associate Minister for Long-Term Care clarified the scope for extensions that will be done individually, not sector-wide.

Erin Hannah wrote that homes can request seven-day extensions on a “case-by-case basis” for people in extenuating circumstances, with the possibility of repeat extensions for the same person.

Examples of such circumstances included the inability to get an appointment for a vaccine, the cancellation of a workplace clinic due to an epidemic, if an 18-29 year old is waiting for the third dose of Pfizer as recommended by the Ministry of Health, or if a person was recently infected with COVID-19.

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