The balkanization of Canada is a real possibility under Trudeau

In 1839, British politician Lord Durham proposed a radical idea. He tabled a report on British North American affairs which came to be known as the Durham Report. The report called for the union of Upper and Lower Canada. In 1841, this idea took shape with the unification of Upper and Lower Canada, which became Canada West and Canada East. But the idea of ​​a unified Canada, as we know it, remained a far-fetched dream.

The Great White North Reaches a Critical Point

The United States of America was now an independent nation and many Canadians feared a hostile takeover of their country. The violence and pandemonium that followed the American Civil War sent chills down the spine of the political class in both Canadas. The United States then purchased Alaska in 1867, heightening fears of an American attack. We needed a unified Canada led by one government. But it was not so easy to follow this speech. English Protestants in Canada West distrusted French Catholic power in Canada East and vice versa.

The breakthrough came in 1864 when Canada’s four major political groups formed a grand coalition to give Canada a single government and a single identity. The country grew with the addition of Manitoba in 1870. The Yukon Territory came into existence in 1898, and the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan joined Canada in 1905. Since then, Canada has been an island of peace, calm, prosperity, opportunity, tolerance, and harmony.

But the work of Lord Durham, John A. Macdonald, George Brown and many others who oversaw the unification of Canada is now at a critical juncture. Canada today is on the verge of being divided into several small hostile units, just as the Habsburg Empire was divided into small antagonistic states in the aftermath of the First World War. A process known as balkanization.

The root cause of all the perils facing Canada today rests on the shoulders of Justin Trudeau, a liberal moron and a product of patronage politics.

Former Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, elected in 2019, infamously proposed that Alberta become more independent from the rest of Canada. He even touted the idea of ​​creating an independent police force and a pension plan. Kenney faced opposition from angry Canadians who did not want to break with their country, and the prime minister earned such a bad reputation that even his own party nearly retired him. But what about his successor?

His successor is instigator Danielle Smith, who has even more radical ideas. She wants to introduce the Alberta Sovereignty Act as the first order of business after being sworn in as premier. She has also repeatedly mentioned that the Alberta government will ignore any federal executive order, which he says is not in the best interest of the province. Smith is several blocks to the right of Kenney when it comes to the question of Alberta sovereignty within Canada. But Smith has high approval ratings, she’s not blocked and booed, and her win is guaranteed. So, what has changed in 3 years? We will answer this question later.

Danielle Smith

Let’s first visit neighboring Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe has already crossed swords with Ottawa. Last November, Moe said he wanted to make the province “a nation within a nation.” And just like Smith, Moe has high approval ratings and he’s not blocked and booed.

The scenario in the third prairie province of Manitoba is not too different even if it is far from turning into a movement.

So what is causing this deep mistrust between these provinces and the capital. The answer is both complicated and simple. The simple answer is political, and the complex answer is more anthropological.

The cries of separatism were never heard on the streets of Canada during those years when a Conservative government ruled the country. But now that a Trudeau is in power, the clamor is deafening. If Stephen Harper had remained Prime Minister, this would not have happened. Similarly, if a Pierre Poilievre becomes the next prime minister, the separatist movement will naturally die out.

We now come to the anthropological part. What sows mistrust between two individuals, two provinces, two nations or two blocs? It’s the difference in ideologies, the difference in lifestyle, the difference in worldview.

Read more: US Ambassador to Canada Openly Rejects Canada as an Ally

The group that is not in power always suspects that the other group will one day impose its ideologies, its way of life and its vision of the world. The same thing happened in the United States when Texas, New Mexico and other traditionally conservative states feared a hostile takeover of their way of life by Biden administration elites. The Biden administration has heightened fears by banning drilling and fracking in fossil-fuel-rich states and imposing strict green laws in agrarian states. Now Trudeau is breaking into the farmlands of Saskatchewan and hunting down Albertans with his RCMP. And the result is before our eyes.

As I said earlier, the work of Lord Durham, John A. Macdonald, George Brown and many others who oversaw the unification of Canada is now at a critical juncture. Canada today is on the verge of being divided into several small hostile units, just as the Habsburg Empire was divided into small antagonistic states in the aftermath of the First World War. And for Canada, the solution to avoiding such a catastrophe lies in eliminating the source of the problem. The man. The Prime Minister.

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